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Lynn Adams

Fascinated with the movement associated with metal, Lynn prefers forging and chasing to piercing and engraving. Much of her jewelry features Enamel, an opaque or semitransparent glassy substance applied to metallic or other hard surfaces for decoration or as a protective coating. She was drawn to Enamel “as it is alive and takes experience to keep more or less under control.” Leaving behind a business career of 25 years to embark upon her jewelry career, Lynn enrolled at the Sir John Cass Department of Art, one of the renowned art and craft institutions in the UK. Her training consisted of a formal introduction to the traditional aspects of metalsmithing and jewelry making as well as some of the design work associated with an art college degree. Lynn left London to move to Lyme, New Hampshire. “Although I loved the city, most of my design is inspired by nature. I am attracted by the multitude of layers, color, light and texture found in the wooded countryside here in New England. I feel most satisfied when I can suggest their richness and complexity in my work.” A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Lynn’s work can be found at galleries across the state, Vermont and Massachusetts.

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Nancy Adams

Creating unique scarves, handbags and other fashion accessories, Nancy Adams of Studio 25 also designs stunning mixed media encaustic work. Inspired by the limitless opportunities nature offers to explore color, texture and form, Nancy’s work contains original photographs that are digitally rendered into unique geometric patterns. Each image is then disperse-dyed onto white fabric, reflecting the beautiful natural colors of the original snapshot. Recently, Nancy also began creating encaustic works that combine hand-dyed fabrics and original photographic images with hot beeswax or resin. Nancy applies each image by either burnishing them off of laser-printed paper or by embedding printed tissue into the encaustic surface. She then uses additional wax to ensure every finished piece retains a luminescent quality. Having come from a long line of New England crafters, Nancy developed a strong appreciation for functional art. Inspired by fabrics after learning to sew in Junior High School, Nancy began creating traditional needlecraft work. Over the years, her fabric art evolved and Nancy started experimenting with dyeing techniques, free-hand quilting and computer-generated textile imagery. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsman, Nancy also holds a B.S. in Plant Science and a M.S. in Horticulture. Combining her love of crafts with her love of nature, Nancy’s work not only enhances one’s beauty but also reflects the natural splendor that surrounds us.

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Rebecca Alden

Rebecca Alden’s stunning jewelry is inspired by the beauty and diversity of her natural surroundings. Using precious metals and colorful gemstones in glorious combinations, Rebecca skillfully handcrafts her one-of-a-kind and limited edition pieces through fabrication, the process of assembling and manipulating metal sheet and wire into diverse shapes through forging, sawing, bending, filing, and soldering. Her unique designs are often influenced by the shapes and textures of her rare or unusual gemstones from places across the globe; stones like boulder opal doublets, titanium-enhanced drusy quartz, freshwater and cultured pearls, and Russian pyrite. Rebecca worked as a bench and custom jeweler for several years until she “made the leap” and established her own business in 1997. Rebecca is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Sibel Alpaslan

Inspired by the diverse cultural landscape of her native Turkey, Sibel creates stunning ceramic work that pays homage to her homeland. With a keen eye for color, texture and form, Sibel's work is often a combination of exploration and admiration. Believing it is part of her artistic responsibility to draw from the previous generations and carry that wisdom and spirit into the future, Sibel's work is more than a reflection of cultures past, but an embodiment. Loving the organic nature of the clay itself, Sibel often finds that her subject matters choose her rather than the other way around. This whimsical quality is often reflected in Sibel's work, with its bright colors and beautiful designs. Having earned both her undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Marmara in Instanbul, Sibel opened a ceramics gallery in Kusadasi, Turkey. After ten years, Sibel decided to make America her new home. Having settled in Newburyport, MA, Sibel is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Antrim Street Studio

Creating amazing Shibori scarves, Amy Meltzer of Antrim Street Studio has loved making things with her hands for as long as she can remember. Inspired by many things, the natural world, contemporary and indigenous art, and by architectural forms, Amy also finds creative inspiration listening to music. All Antrim Street Studio fabric is hand dyed 100% silk. Amy begins the dye process using powdered dyes in primary colors, enabling her to mix a vast array of colors. She creates patterns in the silk by using mechanical resist techniques, which involve shaping and compressing the fabric before submerging it in a liquid dye bath, so portions of it resist the dye. Each piece emerges from the dye bath with unique variations in color and texture. After unwrapping the silk, Amy washes out the excess dye with hot water and dyer’s soap. Often this process pleasantly surprises her as she can see, “how nature has had a hand in creating the results. Each piece is a constant delight.” For a number of years, Amy has worked in mixed media collage and printmaking, but was always drawn to working with textiles. After falling in love with the process of creating color on cloth at a fabric-dyeing workshop, Amy began dyeing cotton to use in quilts. When she discovered the Shibori techniques, Amy finally decided to try those methods on silk, and soon after, started Antrim Street Studio, in 2007. Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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Paula Barry

Paula Barry, of Wallace Hill Pottery, creates work that reflects her life. Her beautiful designs, unconsciously influenced by her love of the natural world, have a fluid style. Graceful, yet organic., Paula is greatly satisfied with capturing patterns in her work. Working in both porcelain and stoneware, Paula strives to create work that is both aesthetically pleasing, yet relaxing to the viewer. She adds, “I hope when you view my work, it makes you smile. I am fortunate to create what I love.” Her studio, located in Townsend, MA, offers a perfect view into nature’s splendor. The meadow that lies beyond is often inhabited by deer and wild turkeys and offer welcome distractions for the artist. A juried member of the Dunstable Artisans, League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and New Hampshire Potters Guild, Paula’s work can be found in galleries throughout New England.

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Patti Bax

Creating whimsical clay jewelry and accessories, Patti Bax of The Cabbage Rose loves the limitless possibilities of working with clay. Her interest in the medium took root in college where she minored in ceramics. Although she enjoyed throwing pottery on the wheel, Patti "wanted to make something (suited) for crafts shows." After some experimentation, she began with pins. Over the years, Patti’s work has expanded to include seasonal ornaments, plaques, earrings and garden markers. Despite the steady core of merchandise that hasn’t gone out of style all these years, The Cabbage Rose keeps evolving. Patti is constantly meeting new people who place custom orders for their sports teams, organizations and fundraisers. Oftentimes, new ideas are generated through these interactions. "I love it so much," Bax said of her art, "for me, it keeps evolving and I keep going with it.” Patti handcrafts each piece individually out of white clay, which then goes through an initial bisque fire to harden the piece for coloring. Patti then paints, glazes and fires the piece again to approximately 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. Slight variations in color, shape and finish add the uniqueness of each finished product. Patti also personally signs each piece. "The sky really is the limit on this," Patti say’s of her art, adding that she aims to "make people smile" and believes there is a piece of whimsy to suit any personality. In addition to her clay work, Patti is involved in interior design consulting, window treatments and decorative mural painting.

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Kathy Beeson

Kathy Beeson is a New Hampshire lampwork glass artist whose inspiration comes from colorful rods of glass that are heated in a torch until molten. While liquid, they are formed into a bead, then embellished to create various designs. From her studio, Kathy creates many one-of-a-kind lampwork glass beads using an acetyline torch and colorful glass rods. She then strings each colorful bead together forming gorgeous necklaces, earrings and bracelets. Capitalizing on a wide range of vibrant glass, she enjoys the interplay between shape and color. Kathy often incorporates other elements into her jewelry pieces such as peyote stitch. Every one of her unique designs are wearable works of art.

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David Beffa-Negrini

Creating fine wooden jigsaw puzzles, David's work is skillfully crafted on a scroll saw with a very thin jigsaw blade. Custom cut by hand, each jigsaw puzzle is a unique work of art. Continuing the time-honored tradition of puzzle making, David uses a special blend of basswood backed by a double-thick layer of mahogany veneer. Incorporating a variety of techniques to challenge puzzlers including false edges, drop-outs and cutting along the color lines, each puzzle contains David's signature "jester" piece that is often a reflection of the overall design. After cutting the puzzle, David carefully hand-oils, waxes and polishes each piece for a flawless finish. An avid puzzle collector, David noted that there was no comparison between the qualities of his antique wooden jigsaw puzzles to the contemporary cardboard variety. In 1997, David founded Fool's Gold Puzzles where he could uphold the tradition of hand-cut wooden jigsaw puzzles. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, David is also the editor (and past president) of the Association of Game & Puzzle Collectors.

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Kiranada Sterling Benjamin

Kiranada Sterling Benjamin creates exquisite hand-painted silk scarves, scrolls and other extraordinary wall hangings, drawing upon her years of surface design experience in Japan. She skillfully applies traditional Japanese silk dyeing techniques, primarily Rozome, to her original contemporary work. Kiranada is a published author on Rozome, an ancient resist process, wherein she applies dyes over wax in a painterly fashion, resulting in a rich depth of color and patterns. She is known for her fine shaded qualities and masterful over dyeing. Kiranada has won numerous awards worldwide for her surface design on silk. She has exhibited, taught and lectured extensively in Japan as well as in the United States and beyond, as she is keenly interested in promoting the understanding of the history of textile processes and the people who use them.

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Nancy Benjamin

Combining two time-honored crafts — embossing and reverse painting, Nancy Benjamin of Shades of Excellence creates one-of-a-kind lampshades. She begins this process by carving a natural image into vinyl tiles. Once a lampshade form is cut, she then presses the lampshade paper into the hollowed area permanently capturing the design. Using watercolors, Nancy hand paints each embossed design on the reverse side of the lampshade adding color and depth. Using a transparent paper, Nancy lines the inside of the lampshade to protect the design and complete the creation process by assembling the lampshade. Lastly, Nancy frames the lampshade’s top and bottom rim with nature’s art trim and adds her initials as a finishing touch. Once the light, natural or otherwise, shines through, the image is brought to life and can be enjoyed in every season. After 26 years in a corporate environment, Nancy promised herself that she would find a passion centering on her love of nature and interest in arts and crafts. After discovering that lampshade making satisfied part of her need, she experimented with Embossed and Reverse Painting to not only create a unique line of shades, but express her love and appreciation for the New England landscape. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Nancy’s work has been featured in Accent Magazine and NH Magazine. She also created twelve lampshades as a part of the interior design effort for a This Old House project.

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Kathy Binns

Kathy Binns is a metalsmith based in Candia, NH. Educated in metalsmithing and jewelry at Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston, she has been an instructor at the New Hampshire Institute of Art since 2006. Kathy started her career working for fine jewelers Shreve, Crump and Low and later at jewelry casting houses in Boston and Providence. In the 1980's she became a partner in a fine jewelry casting company, Candia Enterprizes, which ran successfully for 13 years. It was then that she began her business designing and manufacturing museum reproduction jewelry for the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Smithsonian, the Museum of Science Boston and others. Her work has been sold across the country and Japan, and she has also exhibited at professional craft shows including the Rosen Shows American Craft Council Shows and the League of New Hampshire’s annual Craft Fair in Sunapee. In addition to her adjunct faculty position in jewelry and metals at New Hampshire Institute of Art, she also teaches classes at Exeter Fine Crafts and the Maine College of Art.

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Kathy Blackmer

Kathy Blackmer of “Our Glass Studio” creates both functional and sculptural pieces of art glass. Taking inspiration from her surroundings, Kathy enjoys depicting various places she has seen or experiences she has had through her glasswork. By combining color and texture, she can create a plethora of unique patterns, resulting in work full of movement, depth and dimension. Working with either stained glass or warm (kiln-formed) glass, her process can vary. Creating a stained glass piece involves cutting and fitting the glass pieces precisely, wrapping each piece of glass with an adhesive copper foil and then soldering them together along the length of the seams. Kathy then cleans the work and applies a Patina finish. Her kiln formed glass technique varies depending on whether the artist is fusing two or more layers of glass or slumping (heating glass at lower a temperature to achieve a desire shape.) The slumping process often involves the use of a mold to form the glass. Having worked with glass since 1981, Kathy combined her love of the medium with a Business Technology degree. Creating, “Our Glass Studio” in 1989, she teaches classes in stained and fused glass, sells raw materials & displays her own creations. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Kathy’s work can be found in galleries and private collections throughout New England.

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Renee Blanchette

Renee Blanchette weaves beautiful scarves and shawls in luxurious chenille, rayon, cotton and metallic yarns. Renee is as passionate about color is she about weaving. Renee works with color intuitively according to the emotions that the color of her yarn evokes in her. Renee’s love of weaving began on a cross-country trip during a college summer break when she fell in love with Navajo weavings. Some time late she was introduced to New Hampshire’s Harrisville Designs where she took a class in Navajo weaving with Tom Jipson. “The moment I touched the loom I knew I had found my life’s passion.” Renee has been weaving for 33 years. She now owns a big Swedish counter balance loom and works out of her home studio in New Ipswich, NH. She is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and sells her work in select galleries throughout New Hampshire.

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Mary Beth Bliss

Passionate about glassmaking, Mary Beth Bliss and Peter VanderLaan create a variety of work that ranges from functional to sculptural. Each of their creations, whether it is Mary Beth’s jewelry or Peter’s blown works, convey an appreciation of technique, complexity of color, and a keen eye for the aesthetic. The couple’s earliest work combined Peter’s magnificent blown forms with Mary Beth’s intricately etched glass layers and stunning glass earrings. A vast spectrum of technical and design possibilities were further explored by the duo for both individual and joint work. Mary Beth and Peter began working together over 30 years ago when they designed and built a glass studio and shop in La Cienega, New Mexico. Guadalupe Glass was founded in 1993 where they built a reputation creating incredible works of glass. The couple was drawn to New Hampshire where Mary Beth spent her teenage years farming trees with her parents. Mary Beth and Peter are members of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Blueberry Cove Creations

Cathy Provoda of Blueberry Cove Creations creates Eco-friendly watercolor note cards inspired by nature. An outdoor enthusiast, Cathy enjoys gardening, hiking, swimming, canoeing, kayaking or walking. Her love of the natural world is reflected in much of Cathy’s imagery. If she can’t be outdoors, she is inside painting. She confesses, “If someone were to ask me what do you think about the most, my response would be the next painting I am going to paint." Cathy’s inspirations usually come from an experience she’s had. Whether it is a chance encountering with a Mallard duck or a flock of chickadees that flit from branch to branch, Cathy always keeps an eye out for new subject matter. Cathy’s cards are printed on recycled paper with soy based ink and come with a white envelope, tucked into an eco-clear compostable sleeve.

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Doug Blum

Working for over three decades as a potter and artist, Doug Blum creates both traditional and contemporary work in a variety of styles. From his graceful swan sculptures, to his beautiful lily lamps, fine art paintings, sculptures and tiled wall hangings, Doug’s work is well known for his innovative glazing methods and his meticulous attention to detail. Inspired by the natural sciences, many of Doug’s beautifully hand sculpted pieces reflect a combination of grace and fluidity. A member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Doug exhibits his work at many of the top juried craft shows nationwide.

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Mary Borowski

Creating beautiful photographic cards featuring stunning scenery, wildlife, the seacoast and more, Mary Borowski of Mary B. Creations knows just how to take the perfect shot! Faithfully capturing the subtleties of light and shadow, nuances of the landscape and exciting wildlife inhabitants within, Mary has captured a vast array of subject matter. One of her favorite shots, featuring a loon, Mary just happened to be at the right place at the right time. She recalls that the loon landed right next to her boat and she was able to grab her camera and get a photo. With a keen eye for color, design and just a little luck, Mary’s note cards are miniature works of art.

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Dottie Bragdon

Dottie Bragdon’s interest in clay began before she was 10 years old. In art class, she poured sloppy clay slip into molds to make cereal bowls. She raced to the basement daily to see if the clay was thick enough. Throughout her childhood, Dottie’s family used those four small green bowls. In 1961, at Governor Dummer Academy, Dottie finally had another opportunity to work with clay. What attracted her most in the early days was the perfectly round and smooth forms. The journey has taken her toward wheel thrown and altered forms and then back to a line of simpler pots for the magic of soda firings. Dottie also makes Black Bear Pots, a technique learned from Sea Shell Flower, a Native American potter from the San Ildefonso Pueblo in Santa Fe. Dottie is a member of the League of NH Craftsmen and the Newburyport Art Association.

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Shana Brautigam

Shana Brautigam is a potter and teacher working at Rooted in Clay pottery studio. She makes her forms using hand-building techniques such as pinching, coiling and slab building. Without using a wheel, Shana makes bowls, mugs, teapots, large vessels and clay instruments. She decorates the surface by imprinting natural objects such as leaves, ferns, evergreens and nutshells into the clay. The pottery is fired outside in a wood-fired kiln which was built from old electric kilns. The kiln is fired with branches gathered from local woods and scraps from nearby mills. firing with wood allows the flames to touch each pot and create a range of beautiful earth tones and surface effects. Soda ash is introduced into the atmosphere. The soda ash vaporizes immediately and adds to the interesting surface effects, creating a subtle sheen on the work. Shana is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Brick Pond Handworks

Mary W. DeCaprio of Brick Pond Handworks creates ceramic ornaments and pins in the original Dedham Pottery style. Created during the American arts & crafts movement, Dedham Pottery became known for its high-fire stoneware characterized by a controlled and very fine crackle glaze with brushed cobalt designs. Continuing this traditional New England style pottery, Mary’s work is also influenced by her own creativity and interests. Inspired by nature, history, personal experience and pure imagination, Mary’s work also reflects her interests in fine art, wildlife, gardening and antiques. A classically trained artist with degrees from Boston University (MFA) and the Kansas City Art Institute (BFA), Mary founded Brick Pond Handworks in 1988. Located in the small town of Pepperell, MA, it is rumored that Brick Pond Handworks is located on what was once farmland adjacent to a brook where clay was mined and transformed into bricks. Mary’s work not only reflects her many interests, but represents the rich cultural heritage of New England pottery.

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Donald Briere

Using domestic and exotic hardwoods along with semi-precious stones, Donald Briere creates segmented woodturnings that range from just a couple of pieces to those with thousands of individual elements. Donald’s preferred woodworking method, called segmented turning, involves gluing together various blocks of wood or semi precious stones to produce patterns, then putting the glued work on a lathe to contour the edges and produce a smooth finished product. A meticulous process, Donald must ensure that there are no gaps between the individual segments of wood. The finished result is a piece rich with color and pattern. Woodturning is Donald’s passion, he has said, “Watching the piece come alive in the final turning stages is breathtaking to me.” Having created unique designs for well over 15 years, in 2009 Donald’s efforts paid off when he won “Best in Show” in the “Living With Crafts" exhibit at the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen's annual Fair. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Donald’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Matt Brown

A self-taught printmaker, Matt graduated from Harvard College, magna cum laude. Inspired by the ukiyo-e prints of Hiroshige, Harunobu, and others, Matt has adopted the traditional Japanese approach to woodblock printing. A “low tech” printing method, materials include rice paste, dry pigments, sumi ink, and water; multiple carved blocks, a hand-held baren and brushes are the printing tools. Matt loves the process of making these prints: “the way pictorial simplicity is encouraged, the way an image is separated into parts and put back together, the way the translucent colors blend and juxtapose, the way the wood interacts with the paper.” Each of Matt’s prints begins as an original drawing pasted face down on the first or “key” block. Once carved, impressions of the “key” block become the notches to help the registration to be accurate. Matt presses moistened paper onto the colored blocks to absorb the pigment using a traditional hand held flat disc called a baren. In addition to color woodblock printmaking, Matt also makes black and white prints using oil and inks, with a press or a baren. All prints are signed, numbered as part of a limited edition and dated with the actual month the print was made (an entire edition is not often printed at the same time).

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Kathleen Buchanan

Fascinated by relationships and her connection to the natural world, Kathleen enjoys observing the local landscape and its inhabitants. She sees these subjects not only as appealing compositional elements, but as metaphors for the human experience. Collagraph printing, with all its intricacy and subtlety, fascinates Kathleen. A collagraph is a handmade print created by rubbing ink on a collage printing plate and applying pressure to transfer the ink to paper. Kathleen uses Bristol paper and acrylic medium. Once the plates are made, they are inked with an oil based etching ink. Excess pigment is wiped away using a tarlatan (starched cheesecloth.) An etching press is used to print the plates one at a time, generally working from light to dark. The inked plate is laid to rest on the press bed with paper on top and felt blankets over the paper to cushion the plates as they run through the press.

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Corwin Butterworth

Corwin Butterworth expertly crafts fine furniture and home accessories primarily from North American hardwoods, cherry, walnut and maple. Using a combination of century’s old hand techniques and modern machinery, Corwin’s work is a seamless blend of timeless elegance with contemporary appeal. Initially a studio art major, Corwin fell in love with woodworking after taking a summer class at the Rhode Island School of Design. After an apprenticeship with his instructor and an intensive twelve-week course at the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Rockport, Maine, Corwin felt motivated to start pursuing woodworking full time. His work can now be found in galleries and homes throughout New England.

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Rick Carlson

Rick Carlson creates stunning pens and shaving kits out of wood and acrylic. All of Rick’s work is handcrafted on a lathe. Transforming a rectangular block of wood or acrylic into an elegant finished piece is a time consuming and delicate process. Turning each piece individually, Rick slowly whittles away the wood until the desired thickness and shape is achieved. The turned piece is then sanded smooth with progressively finer abrasives. To protect the surface of his turned work, Rick applies a high-gloss finish that gives the piece an elegant and sophisticated feel. Like all good works of art, no two pieces are alike.

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Carve Designs

Using beautiful designs made with Japanese origami paper, Paige Canfield of Carve Designs Vermont creates nature inspired note cards, bookmarks and calendars. After years of working as a furniture designer, making cards only for friends and family, Paige took a career detour and founded Carve Designs in 2012. Inspired by nature, many of Paige’s designs reflect her affinity for the natural world. Several years ago, while working in an art supply store in Oakland, CA, Paige came across Japanese Chiyogami paper and fell in love. Featuring many wonderfully decorative patterns, the Chiyogami paper seemed a natural fit for Paige’s work. Having grown up in the mountains of southern New Mexico, the imaginative spirit of that place has never completely left her. Yearning to leave the hustle and bustle of the urban world, Paige eventually settled in Calais, Vermont. Her beautiful notecards can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Claudia Chase

Claudia Chase creates one-of-a-kind tapestries, baskets, purses and beaded jewelry — all in gorgeous color combinations! “My relationship to color is the common thread that carries from piece to piece, from wools to beads to silk thread and back again to the dye pot, where most of my tapestries’ colors begin.” Claudia studies color in nature, believing that “color theory is the grammar of the visual world.” Claudia approaches her jewelry making from the perspective of a tapestry weaver, in terms of color and technique. She loves the “visual quality of intersecting beads and fiber. “ Claudia uses three painstaking techniques that allow her to intertwine as much as possible: bead weaving on a loom, off-loom “weaving” and crochet. Each of her ribbon like woven necklaces and bracelets, as well as her coil like crocheted pieces, are ravishingly beautiful with unique color palettes made from various glass beads, Austrian crystals and semi-precious stones. Claudia has been working in the fiber and bead arts since 1989. She is the owner of “Mirrix Tapestry Studio Looms,” the leading manufacturer of portable metal tapestry and bead weaving equipment. She has taught various fiber and bead classes and has been a featured writer fir magazines such as “Fiberarts” and “Beadwork.” An award winning weaver, Claudia’s 1994 tapestry ornament was accepted for the White House collection. Her artwork has been featured in several group and solo exhibits and is available in select galleries.

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Tatyana Cherepova

Tatyana Cherepova calls her business Crealm, which stands for Creative Realm. Tatyana makes jewelry for people who want to look and feel different and express their individualities through wearable pieces of art. Tatyana follows the motto "Always Different!" when creating her one-of-a-kind designs. Working primarily in gold, sterling and combinations of these metals, semiprecious stones, pearls, coral or amber are incorporated into each piece. As an avid international traveler, Tatyana is inspired by the diverse cultures around the world. A portfolio of almost 2,000 original designs is a result of innate creativity, acquired trade skills and hard work. A juried member of the Leaguw of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Tatyana's work can be found in galleries across the state.

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Tim Christensen

Working in porcelain, Tim Christensen creates stunning black and white sgraffito pottery. His designs are literally snapshots of the world around him and Tim prides himself on capturing scenes that would otherwise go unnoticed. Whether it’s the crows that follow the potter during his walks in the woods or the fish swimming in the river by his home, Tim’s work is an evolving narrative of the world around him. Working in sgraffito, a method not unlike scratchboard, where the top layer of colored slip is removed to reveal the bare clay beneath, Tim begins each piece as if he were illustrating a dream. This approach allows the artist to capture subject matter his conscious mind might not otherwise be able to express. Generally spending one day a month throwing on his pottery wheel, Tim lets the clay air-dry before sanding, painting and carving each piece with a dry point stylus. Creating work he hopes will resonate with future generations, Tim’s pots don’t just reflect nature, but the time in which we live and the challenges we face as a society divorced from our natural world. Graduating from Colby College with a degree in poetry, Tim occupied himself with many different jobs before stumbling onto pottery. Living off-the-grid near the coast in eastern Maine, Tim is a member of the Maine Crafts Association. He has received many awards for his pottery and sculpture, including those from the Society of Arts and Crafts: CraftBoston, the Thorne-Sagendorf Museum and the National Prize Show at the Cambridge Art Association. Tim’s work has been shown around the country and can also be found in galleries and fine craft shows throughout New England.

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Lucinda Clarke

Lucinda Clarke of Winterworks Silk Scarves makes a variety of colorful silk scarves with different, stenciled shapes. She begins with an untreated white scarf made of satin silk. This silk has one side with a smooth, lustrous satin-like texture and one side that is similar to hobatoi silk. Water and a special (heliographic) light-activated dye is applied to the first side of the scarf. Lucinda’s hand-cut paper stencils are layed onto the dyed scarf and pressed down. Each stencil is individually cut with small scissors. The scarf is then placed under lights to activate the dye. Where there is a shadow cast by the stencil, the dye is not activated, and the designs are revealed. The whole process is repeated on the opposite side. The dye is heat set on each scarf. Lucinda’s technique evolves with each scarf that is made, resulting in the uniqueness of each scarf. The two sides of the same scarf are made somewhat different by varying the stencils as well as the colors from side to side.

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Jodi Clayton

Jodi Clayton of One Lupine Fiber Arts handcrafts gorgeous felt work scarves, wraps, capes and jackets from pure silk chiffon and pure Merino wool. Each piece is made individually with specific attention to design, drape, color and texture. These elegant pieces provide a beautiful fashion accent as well as practical warmth. Jodi’s business, One Lupine Fiber Arts in Bangor, Maine, has grown out of her love for wool and respect for the rich history of textile development and design. Hand felting is an ancient artistic tradition used in every corner of the world to create clothing, fine art, shelter and more. “Working with wool is, by definition, an exercise in sustainability, utility and balance. It is one of the many ways to live artfully in this world.” Jodi’s extensive hand processing ensures the uniqueness of each finished piece of felt work. Her products are comprised entirely of fiber from sheep raised in Maine by growers who value their flocks and rural life in Northern New England. She purchases her wool as raw fleece and hand processes it to create the washed, dyed, combed and spun fiber found in her finished work. Her rich color palette has enticing names such as Aegean, Bay Leaf, Moonlight, Cream Sickle, and Sweet Pea. Her light weight and winter weight scarves are available in many colors. Her “Fusion” Jackets and coats are available select stunning combinations such as “Plum Dragonfly” or “Ebony/Red Chili.” Jodi also creates a wide range of non-apparel felt items including: wall hangings, placemats, table runners, dog beds, juggling balls and felting kits. Felt is not only durable and beautiful, but it also adds a distinctive touch to any space.

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Bruce Cobb

Creating a variety of hand-blown glasswork, including vases, bowls, candle sticks, ornaments and delightful birds, Bruce Cobb works without a helper or use of any molds. Relying on a technique based on the 19th century American Lily Pad Design, Bruce gives his pieces a contemporary twist, with the design taking on a wave-like pattern. In addition to being decorative, the design elements also perform as grippers making it less likely for an item to slip out of one's hand. They also provide extra sturdiness to the work. Bruce began his training in glassblowing in 1976, as an apprentice at the Pairpoint Glass Company in Sagamore, Massachusetts. The work fascinated him and he advanced rapidly through the stages of apprenticeship. In 1981, he moved to New Hampshire to work as an assistant to Richard Harkness, a glassblower in Epsom. It was there that he applied the production-oriented techniques learned at Pairpoint to a studio situation, with the freedom to work with many different styles and a wide range of colors. In 1983, he took a job at a printing company, while working on building the glassblowing equipment he needed as time and money permitted. Finally, he began his own studio in Pittsfield, NH, becoming a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen shortly thereafter. Bruce’s work can be found In fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Sally Cornwell

Relying on ancient hand-building techniques, Sally creates a wide range of stunning pottery. From her beautiful vases to her singing marble bowls, Sally’s work echoes the essence of the clay itself, revealing not only her appreciation for the natural world, but her passion for pottery. Sally’s creative process is deeply influenced by nature. A naturalist, Sally captures the rustic spirit of the outdoors through her use of form, color and décor. Working by hand, Sally constructs each piece of her unique pottery by either pinching, combining lines of coils or using rolled out slabs of clay. She then adorns each piece with organic elements. Sally first began experimenting with pottery as a hobby, taking various classes throughout her high school and college years. It wasn’t until her early twenties that Sally began exploring the medium more seriously. Under the tutelage of a potter who had studied ceramics in Osaka, Japan, Sally began refining her techniques, transforming her hobby into a successful career. In addition to pottery, Sally also works with her husband as a chocolatier. Their company, Winnipesaukee Chocolates, produces two lines of chocolate bars, each celebrating different regions in New Hampshire.

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Noah Cote

Wood worker, Noah Cote creates stunning turned pens, envelope openers, key chains and more out of beautiful maple wood. The wood, taken from a diseased and dying century-old sugar Maple tree that stood in front of the Robert Frost farm in Derry, NH, was thought to be the inspiration for Frost’s poem, “Tree at my Window.” Noah has been lucky enough to be issued some of this precious wood for use in his work. Using a lathe, every one of Noah’s pieces is meticulously hand-turned. He then uses a clear finish/oil on most of his pieces to enhance the natural beauty of the wood. Noah’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts and the Robert Frost Farm gift shop.

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Ron Cravens

Ron has become well known for his extensive jewelry selection of interesting designs incorporating clean classical lines with sturdy construction. He works sterling silver and 14k gold into beautiful designs using jewelry saws, pliers, and forging hammers and insists on hand finishing all his pieces from the heaviest to the most intricate. Ron’s collection includes pieces with pearls as well as a wide variety of glorious stones such as turquoise, amethyst, garnet, lapis, onyx, amber and peridot. He enjoys creating jewelry with wide appeal that will be well worn for many years. In 1971, Ron settled in central New Hampshire with his wife, Rose, in a quiet country location where he raised a family, developed his jewelry business and continues to design and create with enthusiasm. Ron Cravens is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Steve Cunliffe

Steve Cunliffe creates appealing functional pottery from red and white stoneware. His extensive background in furniture making is reflected in the designs of his pots. The forms that he chooses for his pottery are simple and clean with an elegance that resembles the lines of fine furniture. Steve’s mugs, bowls, pitchers, covered jars and casseroles are a pleasure to hold. His quiet colors and simplicity of form evoke a serene feeling. The details of Steve’s minimal designs embellish the work without overwhelming it. A professional woodworker to this day, Steve was a furniture maker for 15 years before he turned to clay five years ago. He likes the immediacy of working with clay, having his hands directly in the clay, rather than having a tool between himself and the wood. Steve’s ceramic work is constantly evolving as he continues to experiment with new techniques. He’s currently working on “new free form bowls” that are asymmetrical. Steve is self-taught, mostly through books and magazines and by visiting other potters. He notes that potters are usually very generous with their time and knowledge, which is something that he wants to continue in his own practice. 0teve is an active member of the New Hampshire Potter’s Guild and a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen in both ceramics and wood. He works from a studio in his home in Henniker.

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Jackie Cunningham

Passionate about painting, Jackie Cunningham’s representational work focuses on the beauty of a particular scene. Aiming to make people smile when they view her work, Jackie’s inspirations come from textures and “aromas.” She loves to paint flowers until you can smell them or take with you for a walk on a sunny day through a sunny pasture and smell the fresh air. “Mostly it is the local color of my subject and the lovely touch of its complementary color that gets me excited.” Sometimes everything else is put aside so she can paint the subject, at that very moment then and there. Living in New Hampshire, Jackie feels fortunate to have so many wonderful scenic areas to paint. Having painted professionally for the past 13 years, Jackie is a member of the Newburyport Art Association, Andover Artists Guild, Rockport Art Association(Contributing Member) and Seacoast Artists Association. Having received many awards for her work, Jackie’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Jack Curran

Jack Curran of Paddock Way expertly crafts treasure boxes in different combinations of native and exotic woods including: Bubinga, Cherry, Padauk, Sapele, Walnut, Curly Maple and more. All of his boxes consist of a primary wood (which comprises the bulk of the box) and an accent wood. Inspired by the Arts & Crafts movement, much of Jack’s work reflects simple, yet graceful forms and attention to detail. Having spent 30 years designing beautiful custom furniture, Jack believes his work is as much about the creative process as it is about the resulting product. Striving to achieve quality, Jack’s beautiful boxes and custom furniture not only reflect his artisanal skills, but are also unique pieces of functional art. His work can be found in fine crafts shows, galleries and private collections throughout the country.

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Jill D'Angelo

Crafting intricate beaded jewelry in precious metals like gold and silver, Jill D’Angelo began to pursue the craft professional when her mother, a painter, proudly showed off one of her bracelets to a shop owner in Portsmouth. Made from Japanese delica beads, or seed beads, Jill individually slides each piece in place without the use of a chart or graph. Meticulous work, Jill creates intricate, Native American inspired patterns on her bracelets, necklaces and other pieces. Her work is not only a beauty to behold, but felt and worn as the pieces are lightweight and fun to touch. Holding a master's degree in journalism, Jill was brought up in a creative family. Her mother’s oil paintings were shown in galleries throughout New Hampshire and Maine, while her father, an ear, nose, and throat surgeon, was a long-term art appreciator. After showcasing her work at her family’s gallery in downtown Portsmouth, Jill’s work can now be found in galleries throughout Maine and New Hampshire.

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Trish Dalto

Trish Dalto began blowing glass in 1989 as a student at Franklin Pierce College. Right away she knew that it would be challenging and very hot, but she was hooked. Trish started working for another glass blower where she began to produce and sell her own designs. Her first studio, North Country Glass, was opened in 1995, with a partner. Their hand-blown glass pieces sold locally and across the country. In 2012, Trish went out on her own. Her production includes a range of decorative and functional glass vases, bowls, tumblers, paper weights and ornaments. All of the pieces are original designs, free formed and one-of-a-kind. Trish is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Arra David

Inspired by New England’s beautiful beach stones, Arra David and Anne Johnson of Seastones are longtime New England rock hounds. Creating functional artwork in stone, including stemware, food servers, wine racks, sculptures and more, their love for Mother Nature inspires Arra and Anne to create items that brings the outdoors in. Crafting each piece with attention to detail, quality, and respect for nature, working with stone calls for custom fixtures and techniques. Arra, an engineer and serial inventor, says it's part of his "normal care and feeding" to put him in the workshop and let him make new products and tools. Anne is an artist with a keen eye for balance and harmony. She enjoys combining the endless varieties of nature's materials into pieces that will not only accentuate homes, but keep people connected to their environment. To keep beaches and forests as they are, Anne and Arra "plant" a new quarry stone in the water to replace each one gathered and they plant ten times the number of trees harvested for their work. Based in Windham, NH, Arra and Anne created Seastones in 2003, where they continue to this day blending stone art with the practical ingenuity — a well-known New England trait.

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Deluo Naturals

Curious in what products she could produce from her beekeeper brother's honey and beeswax, Diann Sherbak of Deluo Naturals started making soaps and lotions as a hobby. From this initial success, Diann grew confident in the demand for high quality, handcrafted, all natural bathing products and Deluo Naturals was born. Diann’s approach is quite simple. She hand makes all of her natural soap blends and body care products using only natural ingredients — no artificial coloring, synthetic scents or animal based oils. With the combination of all natural moisturizing oils, butters and essential oils, Diann’s soaps are sure to please the mind, body and spirit.

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Lorraine Dilmore

Lorraine Dilmore works in wheel-thrown stoneware and porcelain and explores the medium with rich warm glazes and textures. She also incorporates her studies of sumi-e, Japanese brushwork, with its subtlety and simplicity, into her work. The designs are applied directly on the wet, freshly-thrown pots as they spin slowly on the wheel, creating a fluid, spontaneous effect. No two pieces are exactly alike, although the “feel” is consistent throughout the line of work. A visit to Lorraine’s studio will find her at the wheel, surrounded by wildflowers, leaves and cut flowers from her many gardens. From these natural sources of inspiration, she experiments and creates shapes and forms in clay to be decorated with a variety of colored clay “slips.” This durable, functional, and attractive pottery is oven-proof and dishwasher and microwave safe. All glazes are lead-free. Lorraine is a Fine Arts graduate of SUNY/ Potsdam. She teaches pottery at Exeter Fine Crafts and is a juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Ann Dillon

Design, color and texture have always been major components of Ann Dillon’s life. For many years, Ann was a weaver creating mostly one-of-a-kind wearables. Now Ann works with polymer clay – a fascinating material that when made into beads and jewelry gives an end result as varied as the person who wears it. Strings of beads, earrings, pins and pendants are beautifully created by Ann. Each piece is unique. Ann is the Art Director of Cobblestone Publishing where she designs two magazines and oversees design and production of five children’s magazines. She is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, New Hampshire Polymer Clay Guild, National Polymer Clay Guild and Bead Society of New Hampshire. Ann majored in Fine Arts at UNH.

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Jack Dokus

Jack creates a wide range of sterling silver and gold jewelry or “body adornment” from simple elegant designs to intricate one-of-a-kind pieces. Fine detail, technical quality and imagination are the hallmarks of his work. Through his training, experience, and unique inner consciousness, Jack reshapes metal into an expression of beauty that can be fanciful, dramatic or have a hidden meaning. Jack also creates small sculptures which are art on the scale of jewelry. In 1976 Jack and his family moved to New Hampshire and according to Jack, “it was the greatest move of my life.” Jack has received Bachelor and graduate degrees in Fine Art and metal work. He is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Dierdre Donchian

Deirdre Donchian of Moon Angel/Primitive Designs creates one-of-a-kind jewelry and ornaments. With her ornament line, Moon Angel Designs, her “Gold” ornaments are etched out of polished brass, while her “Silver” ornaments are etched out of polished brass and then heavily plated with Rhodium. Rhodium, a member of the platinum metal family, is a durable, non-tarnishing silver finish that is virtually indestructible. Dierdre then lacquers each ornament to repel tarnish. Her jewelry line, Primitive Designs, features jewelry hand made at the bench, with materials that include fine silver, 14k to 18k gold and semi precious stones. All findings such as chains and ear wires are sterling silver. Having grown up in New York City, Dierdre graduated from Rhode Island School of Design and proceeded to conceive, manage, and run two gift shops in the seacoast area of Maine and New Hampshire. A member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Dierdre’s work has been shown in galleries and trade shows throughout the country.

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Dierdre Donnelly

Creating uniquely symbolic jewelry with a contemporary flair, Deirdre makes earrings, pendants, rings and cuff bracelets using silver, high karat gold and quality gemstones. Inspired by her Celtic roots, Deirdre’s designs reflect a deep reverence for the decorative imagery of Ireland’s Bronze Age. Using a variety of techniques including forging, forming, stamping, lamination and granulation, Deirdre also makes her own sheet and wire in gold. Preferring translucent stones to opaque ones, Deirdre uses a variety of gemstones that have a rich history and mythology associated with them. Originally from Ireland, Deirdre was inspired to learn metalsmithing from the "îr" (meaning "gold" in the Irish language) Exhibition at the National Museum of Ireland. Having studied at the Jewelry Arts Institute in New York, Deirdre continued to hone her skills as a jeweler by taking advanced classes and workshops with several International artists. Now settled in the picturesque state of Vermont, Deirdre continues to make elegant jewelry with a modern appeal. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Deirdre’s jewelry can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Sarah Drummond

Water, marshlands and mountains are all sources of inspiration for Sarah in the creation of her fabric landscapes. Through her unique layering technique, Sarah is essentially painting with fabric. She starts by laying out fabrics together using the gifts that can be found in the colorful printed pieces. She selects her perfect small swatches from a studio full of printed cottons, batiks, silks and metallic and upholstery fabrics. Sarah uses netting and freeform quilting techniques to add texture and hold the finished piece together. A graduate of UNH with a degree in art with an emphasis on weaving and textiles, Sarah designed fabrics for the garment industry. In her fiber collages, she captures the beauty of the nature surrounding her in an abstract assemblage of color and texture. Each piece is truly unique.

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Jan Drygulski

Artist Jan Drygulski creates whimsical collage cards that often feature animals or other amusing accents. Using torn bits of various colored papers, Jan skillfully turns the paper scraps into fanciful cats, dogs, bears and other delightful subject matter. The cards are blank on the inside, allowing you to come up with your own personal message. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Jan is also involved with the Newbury Art Association. In addition to teaching workshops in her chosen medium, Jan’s work can be found in fine craft galleries and has been featured in solo exhibitions throughout New England.

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Janet Duchesneau

Janet Duchesneau of East Wind Pottery creates highly refined, wheel-thrown pieces, decorated with colorful Macro-Crystalline glazes. Janet’s work is both functional and visually interesting. Creating pottery is more than a simple mechanical process but a diverse mode of expression. Working in porcelain, Janet’s work displays a distinct crystal growth on the glazed surface of her pottery. Her unique glazes are created from large amounts of silica, zinc oxide, and titanium forming crystals of zinc silicate, or Willemite. Equally critical are the firing and cooling cycles of the glazed pieces. Janet fires her work at 2350 degrees and cools it slowly allowing the crystals to form. No two pieces are alike. Having grown up in Paris, France, Janet was surrounded by the arts and felt a natural inclination towards it. After high school, Janet returned to the states, and in 1979, she opened her first pottery studio. Janet is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Scott & Ian Duffy

Scott and Ian Duffy’s family business, Rockledge Farm Woodworks, creates individually hand crafted fine furniture and home accessories primarily from native Vermont hardwoods. At Rockledge Farm it’s all about the wood. Most of their work is made wholly or in part using “figured” hardwoods such as Birdseye and Curly Maple, Black Walnut, Cherry, Flame Birch, and Burls which are all locally grown and sustainably harvested. “We believe the most beautiful wood furniture and gifts are those in harmony with nature.” The pair have an extensive line of home accessories and unique gifts including single plank cutting and serving boards, a full line of cherry serving pieces, handsome chess boards and chess pieces, boxes, bowls, lamps and much more. The Duffy family has a heritage of woodworking at Rockledge Farm in Weathersfield, Vermont. Four generations ago they operated a mail order business involving wood furniture. Today Rockledge Farm is a small, family operated business located on their 200 year old “hill farm”. Although barns have been converted for their wood working business, they still have livestock on the farm! One of their barns is a storehouse of rare pieces of wood. A piece may sit for years until it “speaks” to them, and “the proper use for that wood becomes apparent.” Rockledge Farm Woodworks’ finely crafted products may be seen in their Gallery and in select galleries around the nation.

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Sharon Dugan

Sharon Dugan creates fine handmade baskets from trees right here in New England. A labor-intensive process, Sharon starts with a log of wood, painstakingly removing the bark, then pounding the length of the log repeatedly to separate the growth rings into long strips. Removing the splint from the log is just the beginning, each piece of the rough “tree run” must be peeled lengthwise one or more times to expose the satin inner face. The back rough side is scraped or sanded smooth and then the splint is slit to the necessary width. Sharon then weaves the splints into the base of a basket that she later mounts to a wooden mold to finish weaving the piece to the desired height. The final steps are to dry the basket, pack down the weavers, weave in a binder, and lastly, fit and lash the appropriate inner rims, outer rims and handle. Having a deep appreciation for nature that developed during her childhood, Sharon learned basket weaving from her mother using dyed reed, grapevine, palm tree racemes and other natural materials. Later becoming a graphic artist, Sharon experimented with photography and needlework, but was always drawn towards wood. After seeing a fine black ash basket at an art show at Plymouth State College, Sharon realized she had found the perfect medium. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Sharon’s work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Soosen Dunholter

Known for her minimalist style that focuses on the interplay between form, color, and line, Soosen Dunholter creates unique hand-pulled prints, encaustic and mixed media work. As an abstract artist working in many different mediums, Soosen enjoys the confluence of chance and experimentation. Her unique designs unify her love of color and pattern with her desire for storytelling. In love with the artistic process, Soosen focuses her attention initially on creating surface texture, then she continues to rework and add imagery with hand-pulled prints, scraps of antique papers, pencils, paint and/or direct transfer techniques. Soosen also creates whimsical encaustic pieces that feature her fanciful laundry line art. Soosen is a member of the Monotype Guild of New England, a Juried member of the New Hampshire Art Association and Cambridge Arts Association, board member of Friends of the Dublin Art Colony and The Healing Arts Gallery at Monadnock community Hospital. An award winning artist, Soosen’s work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions, in galleries and cultural centers throughout the country.

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Edgecomb Potters

Edgecomb Potters, founded by Chris and Richard Hilton, are known for their innovative glazes. Spending years studying and perfecting glazing techniques, Richard developed hundreds of glazes that have gained critical and national acclaim. Richard, a communications major at Emerson College had planned a career in broadcast, while Chris was an art teacher. The two moved to Maine where they began Edgecomb Potters. Starting out in a one-room schoolhouse on the road to Boothbay Harbor, nearly four decades later, Edgecomb potters is still creating one-of-a-kind porcelain pottery. Their pottery has been showcased in multiple magazines including Ceramics Monthly and Niche Magazine as well as being recognized in the Boston Globe. Reveling in the wondrous pottery colors he created, Richard has said, “I believe that great art pottery encompasses a spirit reflected in life; no two pieces, as no two people, no two living creatures, are exactly alike."

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Victoria Elbroch

Victoria Elbroch has lived a life rich and varied in culture, color and experience. Born in Chesire, England, she grew up in India and Pakistan and returned to the UK where her family settled in the picturesque region of East Anglia, which provided Victoria's first inspiration for her art. She married Larry Elbroch, and they moved to the United States and raised their family. Victoria studied at the Lock Haven Art Centerin Orlando followed by training at the University of Oklahoma. Studying and working with Loraine Moore influenced and transformed Victoria's knowledge and understanding of the art of printmaking. The family settled on the coast of Maine where Victoria continues to draw inspiration. Her years in and around New England have provided a wellspring of material and she continues to win awards for her work. Victoria is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and the New Hampshire Art Association.

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Ann Eldridge

Creating stunning intaglio prints, J. Ann Eldridge ‘s work celebrates the simple beauty of our natural world. An artist and conservationist, Ann believes she is merely a reporter recording the course of her days. Her work not only reflects a keen eye for observation, but an appreciation and passion for art. Drawn to the immediacy of drawing, Ann sees printmaking as an extension of the medium. Involving many stages, Ann’s prints begin with a single copper plate that is heated to allow a beeswax/asphaltum varnish to coat the surface. After being smoothed with a roller, Ann smokes the surface black with a candle. She then etches fine lines into the varnished plate with a needle, exposing the copper. The plate is then set in a ferric chloride solution which etches the copper where the lines were drawn. After the wax is removed, the plate is inked and rolled through a hand operated press to print the image onto dampened paper. A native New Englander, Ann earned a BFA in Printmaking from the Massachusetts College of Art. Having studied botany and horticulture at the University of New Hampshire, Ann has also written and illustrated various publications, including a collaboration on a limited edition of handmade books based on ten Robert Frost poems. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Ann’s work can be found in galleries throughout the northeast.

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Tim Elliott

Tim Elliott, a wood turner, has been turning wood for over 25 years. He skillfully turns distinctive vases and bowls and is well known for his hollow-form work, which is often decorated with chip-carved designs. Tim’s shapes are innovative yet graceful, often providing a pleasant surprise with an unique contemporary design. Whether carved from a single piece of wood, such as curly maple, black walnut, mahogany, or Russian olive, or from a combination of woods, all of Tim’s beautiful forms compliment the natural features of the wood. Tim’s work has appeared in regional and national shows and he has published articles on wood turning projects in the United States and abroad. Tim also demonstrates turning and chip carving throughout New England.

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Julia Emilo

Creating hand painted gourds in a variety of subjects, Julia Emilo stumbled upon the craft while on a trip to New Hampshire. Without any formal training, she began experimenting with the process, taking about a year before she became comfortable drying out the gourds. Emilo's initial creations were all depictions of Santa Claus, as the size of the gourds made them perfect Christmas tree ornaments. As demand for her work grew, so did her product line which now includes: dogs, cats, giraffes, elephants, snowmen, mermaids and various human beings. Julia begins each gourd with the drying process. After each piece has dried, Julia soaks the gourds in warm, soapy water and scrapes them clean. After sanding each gourd smooth, Julia begins decorating them with acrylic paint. She then finishes each piece with butcher's wax, which makes the creation waterproof and shiny. Although she was brought up in a fairly creative environment, Julia never imagined she would become an artist. Working at her family's business, the Waybury Inn, Julia occasionally took on creative projects. After discovering painted gourds, Julia found her niche. Now working exclusively in the medium, her work can be found in galleries throughout Vermont, New Hampshire, Cape Cod and Seattle.

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Terry Emrick

Using recycled slate roof shingles, wood, found objects and copper, Terry creates whimsical sculptures and birdhouses that are not only avian abodes, but beautiful works of art. Terry's enthusiasm for creating is evident in each of his one-of-kind sculptures and birdhouses. Everything is inspirational to Terri and everything he does lends itself to his work. Using salvaged materials Terri transforms the discarded elements into something new and exciting. Inspired to create his unique birdhouses from a left over pile of slate, Terry went through some trial and error before becoming comfortable enough with process that he found it to be fun. A Michigan native, Terry earned his MFA from Michigan State University. Working as both a professor and potter throughout the 70's and 80's, Terry's work evolved, becoming more sculptural in form and post-modern in style. In the 90's, after a brief stint in Florida, Terry settled in Maine where he currently works and resides. His work has been shown all around the country including at the Smithsonian Institute. Individual works of art, Terry's birdhouses stand out from the flock.

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Robert Englund

Dr. Robert Englund, Internist and Woodturner, has been turning wood on his lathe for more than twenty-five years. At first, he made pieces as time allowed. Now that he is retired from his medical practice, he is able to spend more time at his craft. Robert turns wood into lamps, bowls, and hollow vessels. His lamps are designed so that bark and the split surfaces from the woodsplitter are included in the base. The bowls are designed to highlight the natural edge of the bark. Robert likes to show the interface between the heartwood and sapwood, unique grain patterns in the wood, bark inclusions, and segments of arrested decay. Robert is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Erda

Erda leather creates blatant contemporary handbags, totes, satchels and backpacks made from either delicious deerskin or rich chenille fabrics in vibrant colors and earth tones. Each bag is handcrafted with care, hand cut and then sewn from start to finish by the same person. The bags come in a variety of shapes, sizes and patterns. Fun designs conceal the practicalities: all the smaller ones convert to belt bags, many are reversible and most have lots of pockets. The artful embellishments on the leather bags make them even more unique. In addition to their ever-changing selection of standard fabrics, Erda has an enormous array of recycled fabrics. These swatches from high-end fabric mills, often just enough to make one bag. By purchasing one of these recycled fabric bags, the customer not only has a one-of-a-kind, but is also helping the environment! Since 1971, Erda has been making bags of deerskin and other soft leathers in rural central m Maine. Primarily a wholesale company, Erda supplies fine crafts galleries throughout the country.

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Deb Fairchild

Creating exquisite jewelry, clothing and decorative items out of seed (or small) beads, Deb Fairchild is well versed in off-loom and loom weaving techniques as well as related media such as chain maille and polymer clay. Although Deb works with many off-loom bead-weaving techniques, she especially enjoys the lacy, supple fabrics created from the freeform expression of right-angle weave, bead netting and brick stitch. The freeform platform also allows Deb to experiment with color and adaptations of technique that have become the hallmark of her work. Having been beadweaving since 2003, every piece Deb creates is a one-of-a-kind study in color, rhythm, movement and form. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, her work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Michael Ficara

Photo artist Michael Anthony Ficara of Eye Candy Photo Work combines photography with a little ingenuity to create eye-catching pictures that challenge the senses. Enjoying photography as an avocation and inspired by the many wonderful elements of Mother Nature including her flowers, wild life, landscapes, townscapes and building structures, Michael has a distinctive way of capturing his subjects, having taken a number of photo images around his home area and on various trips including a 25 state photo tour called "The Great American Road Trip." Using an Olympus Digital Camera System, Mike relies on his photographic eye to capture unique snapshots for the viewer's pleasure. Getting "Up Close and Personal" with each of his subjects, many of Michaels images allow the viewer the chance to create their own photographic story. Having lived in New England his entire life, Micheal now calls Exeter, NH home.

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Erin Finney

Erin Finney of Erin Finney Glass Designs creates unique kiln fired glass jewelry and mosaics. Having grown up in West Virginia, after college Erin spent time absorbing the artistic influences in San Francisco before settling in Northern New Hampshire. Starting her business in 1990, Erin an elementary school teacher and artist, creates her work along side her dog Luke in the mountaintop studio that she and her husband built. The vibrant periwinkle and yellow studio is surrounded by nature and is both the perfect place for Erin to create her beautiful art and a testament to her passion for color and life. Erin's initial jewelry designs were based on the traditional stained glass copper foil method commonly known as "flat glass." The vision to design earrings using combinations of layered glass with individual movement was the impetus for exploring alternative processes, such kiln firing, commonly known as "hot glass." Erin has participated in numerous glass and jewelry making workshops taught by master craftspeople. Having always been enamored with mosaics, in 2013 Erin was awarded a scholarship by the League of New Hampshire Craftsman to participate in a mosaic mural workshop with Isaiah Zagar of Philadelphia's Magic Garden. Erin now creates individual thematic mosaics as well as mosaic murals working collaboratively with individuals to create custom pieces of special places, pets, people and things. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsman, Erin’s work can be found at many galleries throughout the country.

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Liz Fletcher

Liz Fletcher uses stoneware clay to make everything from small bowls to large outdoor sculptures. Her sense of humor and gentle spirit are evident in her delightful work. Liz’s greatest love is making animals and other life forms. Liz is adept at a variety of forming methods, building by hand with clay slabs as well as throwing on the wheel. She loves exploring new ways of creating. Each sculpture is a voyage of exploration. “I’ve never quite grown out of playing – I love clay’s responsiveness to touch, its connection to the earth.” Liz has won numerous awards in regional exhibitions and her work has been shown throughout New England and as far away as Texas and the state of Washington. A member of the NH Potters Guild, League of NH Craftsmen and the NH Art Association, Liz enjoys being part of New Hampshire’s lively arts community.

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Patricia Flynn

Patricia Flynn of Nature’s Fine Jewelry has created jewelry and fine art in a variety of media. Her fascination with birch bark arose from her wanderings through Maine woods. Inspired by their delicate beauty she began incorporating small, choice pieces of birch bark into her work. Patricia combines the birch bark with precious metals, freshwater pearls and glass beads. The birch is made strong and durable, with specially selected lacquers and resins that will not chip or discolor, providing lasting beauty and wear. The bark is harvested from fallen trees, selected for their special markings, making each piece of jewelry unique and a one-of-a-kind.

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Mark & Kathleen Frank

Mark and Kathleen Frank of Renaissance Glassworks create traditional and contemporary stained glass art pieces ranging from jewelry boxes and lampshades to hanging panels, mirrors and windows. Each one of their designs is handcrafted, and when added to a room, illuminates its surroundings with a brilliant spectrum of color and light. “The magical look of beveled glass, when combined with clear textured or colored glass, will add drama to any setting.” Flowers and trees, butterflies and dragonflies, geese, loons and fish are all beautifully depicted in glass. In addition to creating one-of-a-kind designs and custom work, the Franks also restore vintage stained glass pieces. Mark and Kathleen began their careers in glass in 1981 and their studio has produced some of the finest examples of stained glass artwork. The Franks are juried members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Betsy Frost

Betsy Frost creates jewelry that reflects her love of dance and movement. Working primarily in sterling silver, and her pieces are either fabricated from sheet into hollow forms, or cast through the lost-wax casting process. Attracted to sensual shapes and objects, Betsy tries to reflect this magnetism in her work. Striving for fluidity in my pieces, Betsy is constantly trying to 'reinvent a shape' by giving it movement with links or hinges. In Betsy’s work, shape and movement take precedence over surface texture and color. Inspired by artists such as Matisse and Degas, Betsy also get ideas from her immediate surroundings - the shape of a flower, or the 'line' of a piece of furniture or other object. She is mesmerized by patterns in tapestry, wallpaper and carpet. She say’s, “When I'm talking to someone, I must confess, I'm usually studying the wallpaper or designs in the carpet, trying to envision the shapes as beautiful pieces of jewelry." Having grown up in North Bennington, Vermont, the eldest daughter of 10 children, Betsy always thought she would be a doctor, as her father had been taking her along on his surgical rounds from the time she was six. But after a discouraging glimpse of the pre-med rigors at Williams College, Betsy majored in psychology instead. After graduation from Williams in 1987, Betsy pursued a variety of interests. She waited tables in St. Thomas, danced her way around the world with "Up With People," and studied silversmithing in Sweden and at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY. She later moved to Boston, enrolling herself in a master's program in counseling psychology. While in graduate school, Betsy did marketing and sales for a computer company and continued taking classes in silversmithing. It didn't take long for her to discover that she really wanted to design jewelry, so she quit the master's program and began studying at the Massachusetts College of Art, where she later graduated with a BA in Metals. Using tools she inherited from the late Joan Grant, a silversmith and former riding friend, Betsy crafted her first collection. She was quickly accepted into juried wholesale and retail shows. Her work can be found in galleries throughout the northeast.

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William Frost

William “Bill” Frost has specialized in lathe-turned objects of exceptional quality for functional use or decorative display. He works in a broad range of foreign and domestic hardwoods with unusual grain patterns and colors. Most of what Bill creates is one-of-a-kind pieces for discriminating buyers and collectors. Bill’s work has been shown in invitational and juried exhibitions across the country and several of his pieces are in permanent collections. In 2003, trustees of the Robert Frost farm in Derry, NH cut down a diseased and dying century-old sugar Maple tree. Some of the wood has been issued to Bill, 4th cousin of Robert Frost. Bill has been creatively turning his half dozen 6-foot long slabs of maple into highly collectible and treasured pieces. Bill, a retired engineer, has been a member of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers and is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Frye Measure Mill

Now an historic landmark recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Frye's Measure Mill has been water powered since the 1850's. Some of the Mill's first products — including round and oval pantry boxes, measures, and piggins — are still being produced on much of the original water powered machinery. Examples of Frye's oldest woodenware can be found in museums throughout the country. Many years ago, at the request of the Canterbury, New Hampshire Shakers, shaker box reproductions were added to our collection. Because of the same dedication to excellence in quality and craftsmanship today, as in the past, Frye boxes remain sought after by collectors across the country. Striving for the "urge for perfection", Frye's Measure Mill follows documented Shaker traditions as outlined by historians Edward and Faith Andrews to painstakingly create Shaker boxes with native maple, hand bent around wooden shaping molds, and fastened with copper tacks.

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Elaine Xenelis Fuller

Inspired by nature and the exciting elements of clay, Elaine joyfully produces elegant and creative pottery. She makes teapots, pitchers, baking dishes, platters and her signature rim carved friendship and wedding bowls. Elaine makes smaller bowls which are lovely in the surprise that they afford. Mixing two or more colors of recycled clay, Elaine leaves the outside unglazed in order to see the pattern the two clays make. The inside is glazed to make it functional. Along with her hand-built and wheel thrown pottery, Elaine has made 100 bowls for her New Hampshire Food Bank project, “100 Bowls, 100 Meals.” All of the pottery is lead-free, oven proof, microwave and dishwasher safe. Elaine teaches pottery and is a member of several pottery councils. Elaine wakes up every morning excited to begin her work!

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Robin Lown Gardella

Robin creates whimsical fabric and clay sculptures that resemble three dimensional paintings. Her fun fantasy creatures include: sparkling seahorses, snazzy snails, fabulous fish, dazzling dragonflies, swinging stars, beautiful bunnies, dashing dogs, a Pegasus and a daredevil Parachuting Turtle. A native of upstate and western New York, Robin appreciates the school system's comprehensive arts program which planted the seeds of her art career. Her family moved to central Maine in the 70's. She continued to take art courses at Springfield College in Massachusetts, where she developed her painting skills. Through her business, Galleria Gardella, Robin continues to paint New England scenes as well as whimsical and imaginative renderings and sculptures.

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Rick Gerber

With artistic interests that cover a wide range of media, Rick Gerber creates stunning woodblock prints. Carving into a block of wood, Rick leaves areas exposed to pick up ink that is later rolled onto the surface. After carefully applying a sheet of paper onto the wood block, Rick transfers the ink to the paper by passing the block through a steel etching press. The image gradually emerges as the printable areas of the wood block are slowly whittled away. The finished result is a piece rich with color, texture and movement. Rick has studied at the Art Institute of Boston and Monserrat College of Art. His work has been published by the Orvis Company and Gray’s Sporting Journal, as well as other publications. An ‘Arts for the Park’ bronze medal winner and Blanche Colman Grant recipient, Rick’s work can be found in corporate and private collections across the Northeast and the American West. Rick lives and works in Fremont, NH.

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Michael Gibbons

Michael Gibbons of Nutfield Pottery creates a variety of stoneware pottery including bowls, mugs, piggy banks and more! Mike does not use any molds or presses to create his work; every piece is thrown on the wheel, decorated by hand, then glazed and fired to around 2300 degrees Fahrenheit. Ideal for everyday use, each piece is one of a kind. Working with clay for over 30 years, Michael enjoys introducing students to this medium and sharing own enthusiasm for creating. Taking inspiration from his beautiful home state, New Hampshire, natural themes and colors flow throughout his work, from the reds of a New England autumn, to the varied blues, creams and greens of the seacoast. Michael is a juried member of The League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and has over 15 years of experience as a public school teacher. His work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Karen Gola

Inspired by art glass, Karen Gola of Gola Glass creates unique kiln formed glassware that ranges from functional to decorative. From her tableware to her delicate seagarden collection, Karen’s work has an ethereal quality, with soft hues and sophisticated textures. Designing each piece individually, Karen’s creative process involves cutting, layering, fusing, grinding, slumping and sandblasting. Each piece is 100% glass with no paint or other materials. Born in North America’s historic center of glassmaking, Pittsburgh, PA, Karen has been long interested in medium. With degrees in Psychology and Civil Engineering from two universities, Karen’s career has ranged from counseling autistic children to managing the construction of interstate bridges. Starting in the 1970's, Karen began pursuing her glass passion making stained glass window hangings and lampshades. After being accepted to the Corning Glass Studio in New York where she worked with several renowned glass artists, Karen became increasingly interested in kiln formed glass. Turning her hobby into a full time profession, Karen is a member of the Maine Craft Association, the Maine Craft Guild and the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Her work can be found in private collections across the United States, Great Britain, France and Canada.

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Lucy Golden

Lucy Golden has been making jewelry for over 20 years in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Her home and studio are nestled on a 350 acre farm overlooking Franconia Notch. Lucy started making jewelry in high school and then took jewelry courses at RISD while earning a BA from Brown University. She loves color and often incorporates it in non-traditional ways into her brass and silver jewelry. She plays with themes that are important to her; local and exotic flora and fauna, activities in the great outdoors, and the lighter side of life. After a summer of “peak-bagging” (keeping track of climbing New Hampshire mountains that are at least 4,000 feet), Lucy created jewelry with themes that honor the mountains that she adores. Lucy is a juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Lia Gormley

Using traditional goldsmith techniques, Lia creates exquisite jewelry primarily from 18k gold, sterling silver and precious gemstones. Inspired by nature and ancient design elements, Lia combines form, line and texture to create heirloom quality work with a contemporary appeal. Rather than relying on thumbnails, Lia literally draws with the metal itself, manipulating the shape and proportion to create unique works of art. Working directly with the metal allows Lia's designs to evolve naturally- no two pieces are alike. Initially interested in pursuing an illustration degree, Lia's passion for jewelry making emerged while a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. After graduating with a BFA in Jewelry and Light Metals, Lia worked as a goldsmith for a designer in Manhattan, perfecting her craftsmanship and attention to detail. Intrigued by precious gemstones, Lia earned the title of Graduate Gemologist from the Gemological Institute of America. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Lia's work can be found in galleries across the state.

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Don Gorvett

Creating reduction woodcut prints that echo the abstract geometric shapes and distant outlines of Northeastern architecture, Don’s work is both powerful and beautiful. Don’s prints evolve from a drawing (usually from life) that he transfers to a plank of wood. He then carves into the wood block, leaving exposed areas that pick up ink, he later rolls onto the surface. After carefully applying a sheet of paper on pins at the end of the wood block, Don transfers the ink to the paper by passing the block through a steel etching press. The image gradually emerges as the printable areas of the wood block are whittled away. The finished result is a piece rich with color, texture and movement that captures the energy of the landscape, without diminishing its beauty. A graduate of the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Don’s work can be found in galleries throughout the east coast.

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Jack Graceffa

Exotic wood craftsman Jack Graceffa creates a variety of exquisitely turned wooden objects including lidded vessels, segmented vases, ikebanas, jewelry boxes, pepper mills and more! After retiring from his dental practice, Jack soon became busy in his workshop after trying woodturning, Jack was immediately hooked as he has always been a manually inclined person. The comparison of woodturning to dentistry is not much of a stretch as many of the elements are similar, i.e. cutting, contouring, shaping, smoothing and polishing. Truly a labor of love for a retired dentist, Jack is now a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. His work can be found in fine craft galleries across the state.

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Molly Grant

Molly Grant began leatherworking in her early 20's, first by working on her own and then by apprenticing at the Black Swan Leather shop in Portsmouth, NH, where she learned the basic skills of traditional leatherworking. Molly first saw Cordwainer Shoes when she was ten years old at the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen's Fair, known nationally as the oldest craft fair in the nation. She became a juried member in 1989 and participated by showing her line of handbags. There, she had the opportunity to meet Paul Mathews, owner of the Cordwainer Shop. Within a few months' time Molly was traveling to craft shows nationally with Paul and learning the Cordwainer art. Located on the same property as Wild Orchard Guest Farm, the Cordwainer Shop is a family-run, custom handmade shoe business that was started in the 1930's by the Mathews family. As the wife of second-generation Cordwainer Shop owner Paul Mathews, Molly Grant carries on the business today. Molly travels the country to select juried fine craft shows and still makes handbags, but the main business is footwear and teaching shoemaking workshops at the shop and at craft schools across the country.

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Rosalind Grant

Weaving beautiful and comfy scarves in a multitude of colors and patterns, Rosalind “Roz” Grant has long been surrounded by creativity. Her mother, Deborah Grant, was a potter, juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and an instructor at the New Hampshire Institute of Arts & Sciences ceramics department (now know as the New Hampshire Institute of Art). Her mother’s deep affection for craft and craftsmen alike inspired Roz to create. Using rayon, a versatile fiber that mimics the feel and texture of silk, wool, cotton and linen, Roz’s scarves are truly unique and functional works of art!

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Catherine Green

Inspired by the timeless elegance of the Renaissance period, Catherine produces stunning imagery that emphasizes color, form, pattern and detail. Her work, which often features natural elements in the New England landscape, reflects her mastery of the silkscreen process. Silkscreen (also known as serigraphy or screenprinting) is a stencil based process of printmaking in which a design is imposed on a screen of silk or other fine mesh. Using a tool called a squeegee, ink is passed through the open areas of the stencil creating precise designs on the printing surface. Several stencils can be used for a multi-colored print. Catherine is involved in every part of creating her prints, from the conception of the work to its intricate execution. Due to the complexity of an image, Catherine can use as many as forty-five separate hand cut stencils and may take up to six months to complete a single print. Originally from Montana, Catherine eventually settled in Southern New Hampshire. Receiving her BFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, Catherine has done graduate work at Tufts University. In addition to printmaking, Catherine has also worked as a graphic designer, calligrapher and art instructor. She is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Ellen Grenadier

Ellen Grenadier of Grenadier Pottery has been making tableware, custom tiles, and murals for over 30 years. Ten years ago, she moved her studio and gallery to the Berkshires. Her current work is stoneware that incorporates impressions of leaves in elegant bowls, plates, sushi platters, dinnerware, tea service, vases and more. All her pieces are glazed with natural cobalt blues, copper greens and ambers made from iron. Her energetic use of slips and glazes layered in the wet and bisque state adds to the depth of the surface quality. Her work is a stylish blend of well crafted refined form and rich surfaces that are alive with subtle texture and colors.

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Ken Griffith

Intrigued by the enduring dedication and strong work ethic of the Shakers, Ken Griffith of “All Things Shaker” creates elegant Shaker Boxes, trays and carriers. Embracing the centuries-old craft, Ken uses various woods including bird's-eye maple, walnut or cherry to create his shaker-inspired work. Using hot water to soften a band of wood, Ken forms the traditional tail shapes on the end of the piece. Finding the wood has it’s own flaws and personality, Ken meticulously molds the water-softened band into the desired shape. He is careful not to rush this process as any haste could result in splitting the wood and ruining the box. Finishing touches are applied, including drilling and tacking the ends of the wooden band together to form the box shape. Using wooden forms to allow the piece to retain its form, Ken then leaves his creation to air-dry overnight. Initially pursuing a career in high-tech finance, earning a Master’s degree while steadily climbing the proverbial corporate ladder, Ken eventually became dissatisfied. Having a passion for woodworking, it was the simple Christmas gift of a father-son Shaker box class from his wife that completely redirected his path. Reigniting a long lost desire to work with wood, Ken left the hustle of the corporate world and began pursuing his craft full time. Forming “All Things Shaker” in 2012, Ken’s work can be found at trade shows all over the Northeast and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Thomas Hall

Working with a vast array of woods and other exciting materials, Thomas Hall creates stunning contemporary furniture that echoes the graceful elegance of the craftsmen period. The design process of turning ideas into a finished piece is very satisfying for Thomas. Whether working with a prospective client or on his own design, Thomas finds it prudent to build a full-scale model out of cardboard or MDF. Thomas designs his furniture using design elements found in other craftsmen pieces. Individually picking elements out of his vast collection of books and periodicals in his home library, Thomas can adapt current pieces to include any new inspirations or create a whole new piece to suit his overall design. Thomas pays particular attention to the quality of the finished piece. Feeling that not only is the design important, but also the piece’s overall construction, Thomas handcrafts his furniture with expert precision and care. His work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

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Anne Hanson

Anne Hanson is a metalsmith and jewelry designer who works in sterling silver, 14k gold, and Bimetal (18k on silver). She handcrafts jewelry using traditional methods of forging, roller printing, and soldering. Anne received a B.A. in Art Education from Cornell College in Iowa. Anne spent many years, with her husband, operating a 200+ acre dairy farm in Wisconsin. After moving to New England, Anne rekindled her passion for jewelry making. In the summer of 2004, Anne suffered a stroke which impaired her speech and all dominant side motor skills. The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission’s Assistive Technology Center helped to modify her studio space, creating methods and tools that make it possible for her to work once again. Anne is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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John Harris

John Harris began carving 30 years ago making working decoys from cork bodies and pine heads. He took several classes with Steve Brittel, a well-known waterfowl carver. The focus of these classes was on how to shape birds and complete the piece in a few days. Upon retiring as a high school teacher, John and his wife moved to Florida. He was able to devote more time to carving and exhibit his work. Initially, John carved decoys but has since expanded to shore birds, song birds and a few raptors. John carves with tupelo, and in the final stages of carving, diamond bits and a burning tool are used to texture the piece before painting it with acrylics. John is always on the lookout for driftwood as a setting for the pieces; most are found on fishing trips to northern Maine lakes. The lure of New England charm, children and grandchildren drew John and his wife back to their home in Kittery, Maine.

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Barbara Herbster

Fascinated by the natural world, Barbara’s hand woven pieces reflect her interest in capturing its infinite color spectrum. Barbara’s newest series further explores this concept, featuring works that echo the vibrant hues of lands Barbara has visited all around the world. Having found weaving an endless outlet for her creativity, Barbara focuses on creating fabrics with a clean, simple appearance. From her hats to her scarves and shawls, each design is asymmetrical while maintaining a sense of balance and intrigue. Earning a B.S. in Education from Montclair State University, Barbara has taught weaving for over 35 years. Having shown her work in galleries throughout New England, Barbara's creations are more than just mere fashion accessories, but wearable works of art.

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Christiane Hilbrig-Tauroney

Creating original contemporary designs, Christiane makes custom fabricated jewelry using 18k yellow and white gold, sterling silver and an array of natural pearls and stones. Using a wide variety of techniques including soldering, embossing and forging, Christiane designs her unique jewelry right in her home. In addition to these methods, Christiane also works with a mouth-blown torch, fusing layers of sterling silver and gold to create innovative geometric designs. This process allows Christiane to have a personal connection with her work as she literally breathes life into it. Christiane studied at the Kunsthandwerk Schule in Munich, Germany and apprenticed at the studio “Eidel” under the influence of artists Askan and Petra Hertwig. Varied travels landed her in Maine, where she further honed her innovative style under the tutelage of Etienne Perret and other renowned designers. Her original contemporary designs resonate in each artistic creation via a variety of mediums: 18K royal yellow gold, 18K palladium white gold, 14K gold and sterling silver along with an array of natural high quality pearls and stones. Each piece is hand fabricated and formed out of sheet, wire or tubing. Christiane is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Priscilla Hodgkins

Priscilla Hodgkins of Great Island Knitters foisted a lot of ill-fitting sweaters on her family before mastering the art and craft of hand knitting. Her woolen hats, Mobius scarves, and baby sweaters reflect her appreciation for color and fine construction. Having grown up in New Castle and after graduating from the University of New Hampshire, Priscilla moved to New York City where she worked as a medical social worker and then as a commercial producer for live TV spots. She then moved to San Francisco where she worked as a medical secretary for many years, then opened her own computer consulting business and later worked as an IT Manager at a large bank. Around this time Priscilla took up writing. Two years later she moved to Vermont and in 1991 became the Associate Director of the graduate program in creative writing and literature at Bennington College. She is now semi-retired, living once again in her old home town where she is the Town Clerk and Tax Collector and teaches creative writing at the local library. Like her job history, Priscilla’s knitted creations are eclectic, often mixing two or more cultural motifs. Her tams have subtle intricate designs, some of the Mobius scarves resemble fine tweeds and others have bold color stripes. Her skufia hats are inspired by the Eastern Orthodox monks at a monastery where she sang in the choir. Pricilla’s heirloom quality work not only has a wide aesthetic appeal, but are true knitted treasures. Her work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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John Holz

Influenced by art deco and mid-century modern designs, John Holz creates elegant jewelry executed in precious metals and semi-precious stones. His designs are often inspired by nature or geometry, but as the artist himself puts it, “refined with mathematics and engineering, which results in thinking about how to execute the design as part of the design process itself.” With a degree in Chemistry and over 40 years experience in computer systems design & manufacturing and technology consulting, John’s life-long hobby transformed into a full-time career. Although he does have some formal training in metalsmithing (Bucks Rock Work Camp, Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts, DeCordova Museum and Metalwerx), John is mostly self-taught. John approaches his jewelry design with the engineering approach of “try something and then refine it.” His work can be found in fine crafts galleries throughout Massachusetts and at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Elizabeth Hope

Elizabeth Hope of Elizabeth’s Ephemera enjoys creating collages because of the joy they bring. Inspired by the textures in nature and the colors of found objects, Elizabeth likes to accentuate these details in her work. The nubbly arm of a starfish or the orange of a butterfly’s wing can be the foundation for one of her collages. Elizabeth enjoys playing with proportions and combining several patterns with related elements into a single cohesive piece. Recently, stamps, coins and vintage books are inspiring her. Paper has long been one of her favorite medium and Elizabeth has been making cards (and other things) since she was a girl. After studying the classics in college, Elizabeth was an executive recruiter in the healthcare and technology sectors for almost a decade before her paper craft hobby became more serious. By 2003, she was selling her cards at upscale stores in southern California and contributing to Leisure Arts books. Laughing Elizabeth’s Ephemera in Maine in 2009, Elizabeth expended his collection to include gift bags and journals as well as framed assemblages and later on paper cones. A member of United Maine Craftsmen, the Society of Southern Maine Craftsmen, Yarmouth Arts and part of the Maine Made/America’s Best program, Elizabeth’s work can be found at select stores, galleries and juried shows throughout the country.

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Konrad Hunter

Maine artist Konrad Hunter blends traditional and modern materials to create his elegant glass icicle sun catchers. His custom blend of dichroic and transparent glass captures the prism-like quality of a natural icicle. “When I work, I turn out the lights. The glass glows an orange or red when it is hot. Besides being beautiful, it is a great indicator of glass temperature. This in turn informs me on the right moment to make a move. Timing is everything but after the first hour or so it all flows into one long dance. There is a natural elegance to the entire process.” Konrad began working with hot glass after attending Penland School of Craft in 2000. He spent several years perfecting his craft before moving to Northern California where he worked as an assistant glass caster. After graduating with a degree in mathematics from Humboldt State University, Konrad moved back to Maine where he continues to work as an independent artist. When not glass blowing Konrad can be found exploring Baxter State Park or Acadia , for which he designs his own camping equipment.

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Bruce Iverson

Bringing a 3,000 year-old tradition to life, Bruce uses a style called "hsieh-I" a spontaneous style of painting that allows him to capture images of the natural world. As per tradition, which encourages artist’s to wander outdoors, observe nature and then paint from memory, Bruce creates his work using traditional brush painting tools. Dubbed the "Four Treasures," these simple, yet elegant tools include: hand ground sumi ink, bamboo brushes, a carved inkstone and hand made rice papers. Though often appearing straightforward, the art of Asian Brush Painting demands a high level of skill, concentration and knowledge of the materials. Once the brush is committed to paper, there is no turning back or touching up— success or failure in an instant! Bruce signs each piece with the traditional red seal or "chop," a hand-carved stamp in Asian characters that designates the artist's name and studio. Having been painting in this manner since 1972, Bruce studied with master brush painters, Jean Shen, Hsiung Ju and Ning Yeh. A juried member of the New Hampshire Art Association, Bruce teaches various workshops in the medium. His work can be found in corporate and private collections in the United States, Europe, Canada and Australia.

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Island Designs

Chong and Judi Lim of Island Designs create beautifully embossed designs and handmade paper. Collaborating on images, the process begins with Chong drawing each design that he will later carve into a metal plate. Once the plate is carved, fiberglass is then cast into the plate to create a counter image. Judi then attaches the fiberglass counter image to a press, which she pushes down onto a sheet of paper to make an embossed design of the image. For the smaller images, color mixed with wax is sprayed onto a Mylar carrier that is placed wax side down over the counter. The heated plate melts the wax and transfers the color simultaneously as the paper is embossed. Larger designs are airbrushed and/or added to original watercolor paintings. Judi also makes handmade paper and embeds plant fibers into the paper mats using a heated hydraulic press. The Lims find the possibilities in combining various papers with pressed and painted colors very exciting. They enjoy expressing that enthusiasm and joy they experience in their creative adventures. Often their images are representational, sometimes they border on the surreal, with a style somewhere between Eastern and Western influences. Chong immigrated to the US from Korea when he was thirteen. Before long, he graduated from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design with a major in printmaking and moved with his wife Judi to Massachusetts. There he worked for a company creating plates to emboss names and logos inside shoes as well as plates for greeting cards, perfume boxes and other applications. Eventually, Chong and Judi moved to Great Cranberry Island off the coast of Maine to start a business creating plates for similar applications. A chance suggestion by an island neighbor prompted Chong and Judi to carve a metal plate to make their Christmas cards that year. Judi also studied printmaking and painting in college. Their artwork can be found in galleries throughout the Northeast and Midwest.

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Wendy Jackson

Wendy Jackson creates wood-fired pottery featuring sgraffito images of animals and trees. With deep hue variations and rich surface texture, Wendy’s work reflects a deep appreciation for the wood-firing process. A method that is often demanding and lengthy, not only does Wendy prepare the wood, but she must also maintain and fire the kiln. Although laborious, the process is very rewarding as the extreme heat and wood ash produces a stunning array of results. Having dabbled in the clay medium for years, the majority of Wendy’s pieces are built from porcelain clay slabs. Many of those pieces feature beautiful surface patterns achieved through the sgraffito technique of carving through a clay surface to expose the layer below. Wendy waits till the piece reaches a leather-hardened state before carving her naturalistic designs. For her tree silhouette work, Wendy applies a slip glaze, a thin mixture of clay with colorant, that provides a sharp contrast between the plain clay body and slip glaze that turns black when fired. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Wendy’s work can be found in galleries across the state.

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Nathan Jaworski

Nathan Jaworski creates beautiful wire wrapped jewelry featured beach glass and sterling silver wire. Nathan’s designs in his wire jewelry are as unique as the very glass shards themselves. Naturally produced, sea glass originates as pieces of glass from broken bottles, broken tableware or even shipwrecks, which are rolled and tumbled in the ocean for years until all of their edges are rounded off and the slickness of the glass has been worn to a frosted appearance. With each piece of glass having varying contours and shapes, Nathan’s designs are constantly evolving and no two pieces are alike. A native of New Hampshire, Nathan’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Anne Johnson

Inspired by New England’s beautiful beach stones, Arra David and Anne Johnson of Seastones are longtime New England rock hounds. Creating functional artwork in stone, including stemware, food servers, wine racks, sculptures and more, their love for Mother Nature inspires Arra and Anne to create items that brings the outdoors in. Crafting each piece with attention to detail, quality, and respect for nature, working with stone calls for custom fixtures and techniques. Arra, an engineer and serial inventor, says it's part of his "normal care and feeding" to put him in the workshop and let him make new products and tools. Anne is an artist with a keen eye for balance and harmony. She enjoys combining the endless varieties of nature's materials into pieces that will not only accentuate homes, but keep people connected to their environment. To keep beaches and forests as they are, Anne and Arra "plant" a new quarry stone in the water to replace each one gathered and they plant ten times the number of trees harvested for their work. Based in Windham, NH, Arra and Anne created Seastones in 2003, where they continue to this day blending stone art with the practical ingenuity — a well-known New England trait.

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Douglas Johnson

Creating beautifully elaborate and meticulous works of art out of seed (or small) beads, Doug Johnson’s work can contain as much as 300,000 individual beads. Having first come into contact with the beading process in the 1970’s, Doug’s work expanded from stringing necklaces to weaving elaborate works of art. Working from various sized looms he created to accommodate his ever growing and detailed bead art, Doug works from sketches, photographs, or for highly technical pieces, bead graph paper where he can map out his ideas. Learning to work with beads as a way to pass the time, Doug soon became fascinated with the medium. Over the decades, his simple hobby grew into an award winning passion. Having been featured on NH Chronicle, Doug’s work has also been exhibited at art shows in Boston, Cape Cod and can be found in galleries across the country.

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Ian Johnson

Blurring the lines between art and craft, Ian creates precision woodwork including gear mechanisms, jewelry and small desk boxes, cutting boards and larger furniture items. Creating precise, well-constructed pieces inspired by early American furniture, Ian’s work is not only a craft due to its functional nature, but embodies meticulous attention to design, form and surface pattern. From his fine chests to his mechanical gears inspired to promote a fuller understanding of simple and complex machines, Ian’s work captures the visual complexity of movement while emphasizing the natural beauty of wood. Originally from Liverpool, England, Ian began working at Rolls-Royce where he endured a rigorous six year apprenticeship, working his way from the machine shop to the design office by earning an engineering degree. Having both a background in engineering and master craftsmanship, Ian began working in wood to make heirloom quality toys for his children. In 1995, he moved to Antrim, New Hampshire and formed Cogworks to expand his craft. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Ian’s beautiful woodwork can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Rob Jones

Rob Jones is a Master Woodcarver who’s delicately crafted bowls, candle holders and other wooden marvels defy the conventional laws of craftsmanship. Impossible to make with a traditional lathe, Rob constructs each one of his unique pieces with a laser-cutting machine out of a single piece of Baltic birch plywood. He then carefully stacks each slice by hand, rotating the layers slightly to create an array of dazzling designs. Growing up in Lincolnville, Maine, Rob later joined the Navy as an Electronics Technician. Hoping to go to art school, he made several attempts at being an illustrator. Frustrated, he later returned to Maine as an electrician. In 2001, Rob began woodcarving, refining his skills as the years progressed with no formal education. This real world experience has lent itself to Rob’s innovative work.

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Alex Kalish

Born and raised in New York City, Alex was introduced to hot glass in 1985 and it was love at first sight. Alex began blowing glass as a student at Franklin Pierce College. After graduation, Alex worked for a New Hampshire glass blower where he began developing his own designs. Eventually Alex built his studio and his glass blowing equipment. He created unique glass designs including his popular stemware and vases, ornaments, and one-of-a-kind jewelry. Alex’s work over the years has grown to include home lighting and collaborative sculptural installations. All pieces are hand blown without the use of a mold. Each piece is individual and unique. No two pieces are ever the same. Alex is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Carol Keiser

Carol Keiser is a nationally known exhibiting artist who paints on both canvas and tile. Working in her Vermont studio, Carol creates rich and colorful images that include scenes of women at leisure, romantic couples, flowers, still life’s and landscapes. Influenced from having lived in Mexico and visiting other places, like Italy and Costa Rica, Carol will often use symbols in her work, like mountains, water, sun, moon and stars, sailboats and ladders, subjects that represent our natural world and our connection to the divine. Each tile is designed and hand painted by Carol, using a palette of glaze colors and kiln-fired for permanence. The tiles can be installed in kitchens, bathrooms, spas, fireplace surrounds, or a single tile can be framed or unframed and enjoyed as a small work of art. Carol’s paintings and tile work have been exhibited in galleries in the United States and Mexico. She is a member of the Vermont State Craft Centers, The New Hampshire League of Arts and Crafts, The Newbury Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston. Her biography has been included in Who’s Who of America and Who’s Who of American women.

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Kristin Kennedy

Kristin Kennedy began her jewelry career in 1994 in Arizona after earning a BFA degree. She apprenticed with renowned jeweler Jerry West. Kristin’s necklaces, rings, bracelets and earrings are all one-of-a-kind, incorporating the process of hand-fabrication and heat controlled reticulation. The resulting organic shapes become the basic forms for dazzling stones such as amethyst, blue topaz, iolite, peridot and opals, which are individually selected for each piece. Kristin uses the time-consuming process of hand-weaving fine silver chains to enhance her work. She is also known for her use of rare hand-picked Japanese freshwater pearls and naturally occurring Chinese Keshi pearls. Kristin is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Jennifer Kiarsis

Jennifer Kiarsis of Under the Table Rugs creates beautiful hand braided rugs. She uses primarily vintage wool yardage that has been washed, ripped and felted. With an ever-changing collection of wool, every one of Jennifer’s rugs is a unique piece of art. Jennifer loves to work with wool saying, “It has great texture, depth and is naturally water and stain resistant.” Having been braiding for about ten years, Jennifer specializes in area rugs in various shapes for all uses, tablemats, practical pretty baskets and chair pads. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Jennifer’s rugs have been shown in galleries and shows throughout the state.

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Barbara King

Barbara King fell in love with silver when she took her first jewelry class through the Education Department at Exeter Fine Crafts. She creates original contemporary jewelry from sterling and fine silver and incorporates metals like copper and 24k keumboo along with well-chosen beads, pearls, turquoise, moonstones, carnelians and semi-precious and precious stones. Her signature hand-woven silver chains are featured in stunning necklaces, bracelets, and earrings. Time consuming weaving techniques are used to create intricate chains. Original and one-of-a-kind, each piece of jewelry is a unique creation from a talented and accomplished jeweler.

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Christy Knox

Christy Knox of Natural Elements creates handmade pottery using leaves, blossoms and other natural materials collected from her garden in Massachusetts. Fired to a high temperature and glazed with a lead free glaze, each piece is unique and fully functional. Believing that part of the true joy of creating functional art is in the handling and daily interaction with a finished piece, throughout the course of the day, whether gardening, creating or interacting with others, Christy’s pots are a part and product of it all. Her earliest memories are of playing in the garden and walking in the woods. Feeling fortunate to have stumbled upon clay, for over 30 years, Christy has often found herself awe-struck by the visual interplay of color, texture, pattern and natural form. This experience is ever changing, fleeting and unique. Often her designs reflect the moment it was created in, growing, evolving and expanding, much like the clay itself. “My exploration of form and color has carried me around and through the natural landscape. It is a personal journey, my relationship to the earth. It is my hope that each piece carries to you a part of that joy, bringing it into your home and into your life!”

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Jordana Korsen

Jordana Korsen creates beautiful and unique hand blown glass with clean lines that is both functional and sculptural. While incorporating her sense of humor in her work, the glass pieces are still polished, controlled, and technically sound. Her brilliant vases, pitchers, plates, bowls, paperweights and ball ornaments reflect her personality which she describes as “spontaneous, whimsical and free.” Jordana uses the rich history of blown glass as well as her own experiences for inspiration. The precision of Italian glass making remains an influence; however, when energized by the creative possibilities in the studio, she feels anything can be accomplished. Jordana studied fine arts at Franklin Pierce College and with production glass artists at Corning, Haystack and Penland School of Crafts. She is currently the head of the glass program at Franklin Pierce College. Jordana is a member of the League of New Hampshire and League of American Craftsmen.

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Anne Kratz

Anne Kratz creates beautiful braided rugs with a rich and varied palette of colors and fabrics. Braiding together various fabrics that include solid colors, plaids and tweeds, Anne creates unique rugs with depth and texture. Keeping this great tradition alive, braided rugs were a staple in early, Colonial American culture. Settlers used scraps of clothing and other excess materials to make a floor covering that would provide warmth and protection for the home and it’s inhabitants. All of Anne’s rugs are hand-laced in the traditional manner, yet are contemporary in style as many are made with bright, fun colors and interesting visual patterns.

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Kathleen Krzewinski

Kathleen Krzewinski and Larry Young’s work in Realism stems from a desire to be both environmentalists as well as conscious artists by celebrating the beauty and grace of all living creatures. The garden sculptures are hand cut from steel with an oxygen-acetylene torch. They are ground and polished to perfection in distinct patterns to illuminate the piece depending on the angle of the light as it strikes. Each sculpture is welded together and then painted. The stems are coated in a chemical/chip resistant finish and then overlaid with color. The wings are painted with an automotive paint gun in a layering process originally created by the Flemish/Dutch Masters. Rembrandt used this method in his paintings which entails layering one color over another until the desired color has been reached. A “magic quality” is added to the bottom base coat of clear followed by 2-3 more coats of clear to bring out the desired glass look.

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William & Lynn Kuegel

All types of metal appeal to farrier craftsmen William “Bill” and Lynn Kuegel of Equicraft. Their business name, “Equicraft,” reflects the Kuegel’s love of both horses and art. As Bill put it, “I think of myself not as a horseshoer who makes jewelry, but as an artist who shoes horses.” Bill used horseshoe nails for years as a farrier, but in 1977 he and his wife Lynn began designing horseshoe nail snowflake ornaments, which led to jewelry and small sculpture. Equine, nature and fantasy themes predominate. In recent years their work includes many non-horseshoe nail inspired designs using a wide variety of metals. Bill’s designs are open — in a style of line drawings — with small solid elements. Some of the sterling silver pins are created using complete nails, while others, such as Trotting Horse Pin, are crafted with only the tapered shank of the nail for a delicate flowing appearance. The detailed elegance that characterizes the outline work in Bill’s jewelry can also be found in his nativity scenes, miniature sculptures, wall sculptures and life-sized garden sculptures. Partnership is fundamental to Equicraft. Their logo represents the collaboration of horse and farrier. As business and life partners, Bill and Lynn collaborate on designs. Bill then crafts the pieces while Lynn skillfully manages the business. Equicraft’s ornaments have been featured in Yankee Magazine’s Small Business and Crafts section. “Sterling the Snowman,” who inspired an entire family of snow people, was selected as the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen Ornament in 2000. Their work is available in select fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Thomas Kuhner

Thomas Kuhner started working in precious metals in 1974 as an apprentice to a jeweler. He is an artist who draws much of his inspiration from his love of water, nature, and a cool, clear day, creating pieces that represent all that is organic in the world around us from the delicate petals of a summer garden to the ephemeral beauty of an individual snowflake. Each piece is carefully hand-wrought in precious metals by using traditional centuries-old methods of the metalsmithing trade. The metals are forged, chased or peened, then polished to a high shine. Many are embellished with luminous precious and semi-precious stones and lustrous fresh water pearls. Thomas is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Blair LaBella

Relying on the natural environment for both materials and inspiration, Blair creates stunning one-of-a-kind beach stone jewelry. From her earrings and pendants to her rings and bracelets, each piece is not only impeccably made, but exudes a simple and timeless elegance. Blair’s beautiful beach stone jewelry evolved from years of collecting beach rocks, glass and pottery shards from various coastlines throughout New England. Striving to create jewelry that is not only well made, but comfortable to wear, Blair excels at creating a bezel for each distinct rock, piece of glass or shard. Blair signs each sterling silver bezel with her name and, whenever possible, the location of the found object. After attending the University of Vermont and earning her BFA in ceramics from the Rhode Island School of Design, Blair became increasing drawn to working on smaller-scale designs. Having studied metalsmithing at the DeCordova Museum School, Blair dabbled in many styles of jewelry making including Ceramic Cabochons and Keum-boo before creating her beach stone line. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and a Juror in the Metals category with the League, Blair's work can be found in galleries and shows throughout the country.

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Jane LaBelle

Creating fiber pins, hats and bags with a funky, yet sophisticated air, Jane LaBelle of Cool Warm Hats work is as fun to wear as it is functional. Jane creates each one of her unique works out of designer fabrics and high quality polar fleece, an innovative fabric that is manufactured from recycled plastic soda bottles. Just think the bottle you throw away today could become a Labelle hat tomorrow! Jane’s work is available in a diverse range of styles, color combinations, fabrics and textures. Many of Jane’s hats are reversible and most are decorated with contrasting trims, buttons, funky ball-fringe or a handmade fiber pin. Made with specific attention to detail, Jane’s eclectic work provides a unique fashion statement, while keeping you cozy and warm! A tenured member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Jane’s colorful hats can be found in fine boutiques nationwide and at juried craft shows.

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Barbara Lally

Barbara Lally of Shibori Bound has immersed herself in many art mediums including but not limited to pysanky (Ukrainian egg decorating), quilting, painting, silk screening, batik, enameling, jewelry and metalsmithing as well as, shibori. All of her artistic experiences have helped influence Barbara’s use of design and color in producing her beautiful shibori scarves. Barbara enjoys working with silk and dye, feeling that the process combines all the other media she has worked on in the past. From metal enameling to pysanky on eggshell, color and texture have always fascinated Barbara. “The soft luxury and the glowing colors of silk shibori make my heart very happy.” Barbara particularly enjoys resist techniques and can be quoted as saying, “I can’t resist any resist techniques!” A long-time member and state juror in the League of New Hampshire Craftsman, Barbara’s work can be found fine craft galleries throughout the state. She has also recieved nationwide recognition for her meticulously detailed, gorgeous eggs, which have been sold in many fine craft galleries and photographed by Yankee Magazine and other publications.

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Anne Laszlo

Through her travels, Anne Laszlo has developed quite the photographic eye. Creating beautiful photographic cards featuring both local and foreign architecture, fauna, birds, animals and more, Anne’s photos are miniature works of art in card form. From Guatemala and Spain, to right in her own backyard here in Exeter, Anne faithfully captures the subtleties of light and shadow, nuances of the landscape and exciting wildlife inhabitants within. She is particularly drawn to birds and features many different species in her work. Having captured a vast array of subjects, Anne’s cards can be used for any occasion.

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Betty Lathrop

Betty meticulously hand paints her original designs on silk to create stunning wearable art, wall hangings and silk screens. Betty’s designs, whether realistic or abstract, are inspired by her beautiful gardens and her travels throughout New England. Her vibrant scarves often feature lush flowers with large blossoms that flow over the silk such as poppies, irises, lilies, and tulips. Other favorite motifs reflect her love of the Seacoast such as sailboats, whales and herons. The edges of many of Betty’s pieces are “sculptured” rather than straight as they follow the intriguing shapes of her designs. Originally Betty exclusively painted silk scarves until she began making matching earrings to create boxed “Gift Sets”. Recently she has expanded her work to include multi-layered scarves and three-dimensional wall hangings, each layer of which is painted differently, resulting in elegant one-of a kind signed works of art. Betty’s experience with surface design began in her school years. She taught art in public schools at pre-school through university levels prior to establishing her business, Harborside Fabric Design, 20 years ago. Her work is shown in fine craft shops and fairs throughout New Hampshire and beyond.

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Sharon Lee

Fascinated with the surface texture of an object, Sharon Lee’s creates rustic stoneware pottery with warm earth tones that echo the natural surface of clay. Making each piece by hand with traditional techniques including: slab building, coil construction, pinching, Sharon tries to leave some evidence of the seams where she has joined the pieces of clay. She then adds any impressed designs that appeals to her, resulting in a unique, organic piece pottery. To accentuate the texture Sharon covers the entire piece with a coloring oxide then wipes off the surface so that only the indentations hold the stain. Sometimes she uses a glaze and sometimes she leaves the work unglazed. The pieces are then fired to maturation. The materials she uses are not toxic and her work is completely safe for use with food. Sharon studied art at the Museum School in Boston and received an MFA from Tufts University. Her main focus was printing, specifically intaglio printing of any kind (etching, collagraph, wood cuts, etc.) that would emphasize the surface texture. Surface texture continues to interest her and has become a main focus in her ceramic work. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and New Hampshire Arts Association, Sharon’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Judi Lemaire

Judi Lemaire creates brightly colored Ukrainian Eggs in a multitude of patterns. Specializing in the Batik egg decorating process, Judi using dyes and wax resist, building up her colorful designs on the eggs surface. Over the past thirty years, Judi has studied the traditional Ukrainian designs and developed her own unique style using both traditional and modern methods. She contributed to several exhibits including the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen’s “Once a Child”, “It’s all Black and White” and a juried exhibition at Colby College’s Marian Graves Mugar Gallery. She also facilitated a program at the Gilford Middle High School, where one hundred students designed and decorated Ukrainian Eggs. A member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Judi’s brightly colored eggs can be found in galleries throughout the state. She also teaches her craft to small groups in local workshops and her work has been presented in New Hampshire Magazine.

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Damien and Jenn Liddiard

Making wooden jewelry using both laser technology and traditional craft techniques, Damien and Jenn Liddiard of Joyo enjoy taking a natural material like wood and transforming it into unique wearable works of art. With a keen interest in preserving the environment, the husband and wife duo met while building a house for a solar design competition in 2008. Constantly inspiring and motivating each other, the pair have combined Jenn’s graphic design background and Damian’s architect background to create modern, yet fun jewelry. With a habit of looking for patterns in our everyday surroundings, Jenn creates jewelry designs she hopes will draw the viewer in. Laser cutting each piece herself, Jen then sands the wood and applies an oil finish before assembling the final jewelry elements. Their newer work is also often hand painted. From the Boston area, you can also find Jenn and Damien’s work at craft shows throughout Massachusetts and Maine.

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Walter Liff

Working in steel, aluminum or copper, Walter Liff of Steeling Nature creates one-of-a-kind metal sculptures inspired by his love of nature. An avid naturalist, Walter’s work encompasses a range of themes including graceful representations of birds to whimsical depictions of flying pigs. Walter’s interest in metalsmithing began when his son Paul took a welding course in high school. The two developed a strong bond over the craft and when Paul died of multiple sclerosis, Walter continued to make his beautiful sculptures as a tribute to his son. Walter is now recognized as an award winning artist and has been featured in several publications and television appearances. His work can be found in private and corporate collections throughout the United States and Europe.

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Naomi Lindenfeld

Naomi Lindenfeld’s elegant colored porcelain pieces are both functional and decorative, intended for daily use as well as for special gatherings. Inspired by her love of dance and patterns in the natural world, Naomi uses various techniques to experiment with color to create different moods and unique patterns. The primary process involves layering colored clay into a block. Patterns are created by pressing tools down into the block and then slicing it, or rolling out the layered clay, carving away strips, and rolling it flat again to create a multi-dimensional effect. The clay is then hand built into its finished form, or thrown on a wheel. Naomi often carves into the surface, which reveals mesmerizing striations of color. A member of the NH Potter’s Guild and an award winning juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Naomi has been the featured artisan in fine craft galleries around the country.

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Devitt Liptak

With inspiration from Pre-Columbian and Egyptian vessels, the patterns of snow drifts, and the granite walls of New Hampshire, Devitt’s pottery takes its form with a focus on the details of the shape, feet, handles, surface, and volume. Wheel thrown, altered, handbuilt, or a combination of all three are Devitt’s pottery building techniques. Fascinated by texture, she will mark, scrape, stamp, and apply or take away clay from the surface of a pot. The process is finished with firing techniques that include electric, pit, raku, smoke, and wood fire. Devitt received a BFA from Kent State University and has furthered her studies with workshops and intensive studies including Native American Clay, Techniques, and Firing classes. Devitt is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and New Hampshire Potter’s Guild.

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Ken Long

Intrigued with creating works of art with practical appeal, Ken Long creates a variety of turned pieces – platters, wine glasses, ornaments, and urns. Each piece of wood is selected for grain and color. Ken uses a lathe and turning tools to shape each piece, highlighting the inherent beauty of the wood. Ken draws inspiration from Shaker and Japanese woodworking, medieval European woodturnings, and pottery. Starting his career as a draftsman, Ken went on to create sound boards for concert grand pianos, eventually going back to school to become an EMT and then a Paramedic. Having first taken up woodturning as a means to make a Christmas ornament, Ken’s work has evolved, becoming more refined and elegant. With a focus on “living with wood,” Ken turns the medium into functional works of art.

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Jim and Andrea Lorette

Andrea & Jim Lorette of Jayelay Jewelers work together to create hand-forged jewelry made of genuine solid metals, real gemstones and other natural materials. Their castings are derived from their original carvings, treasures found in nature or objects from ancient times. Andrea and Jim make their own tools and use fold forming and anticlastic techniques in their designs. Collaborating between husband and wife is an ongoing adventure into the creative world. Andrea is always seeking and applying new techniques to her work, while Jim specializes in materials. With earrings, pins and pendants, all crafted by either Andrea, Jim or by the two together, there is always something new and exciting going on their studio. Members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Andrea and Jim’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Carol Lummus

Carol Lummus creates imaginative Intaglio limited edition prints that poke fun at social conventions. Carol’s work is appealing both visually and intellectually, as she couples distinctive softly colored images of quirky characters with titles that are witty and thought provoking. Carol’s Intaglio process involves her lines on a copper plate through a resist. The inked plate is printed one at a time on archival paper, signed and numbered. Carol originally studied and worked as a painter. It was not until she taught herself how to use an etching press, that she discovered the perfect medium for her passion for drawing and light hearted social commentary. Carol is currently one of the leading printmakers in the country and is listed in “Who’s Who in American Art.” Her work is in galleries and exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad, including the Currier Museum of Art and the National Association of Women Artists.

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Peggy Clark Lumpkins

Painting intricate close-ups of flowers, dazzling seascapes and scrumptious vegetables, Peggy Clark Lumpkin's work reflects her intent to preserve, and raise awareness to, the stunning scenery around us. Peggy’s work begins with the planting of a seed, bulb or twig, watching the sprouts mature, waiting sometimes years for the flowers to develop, until that one special bloom reveals itself. She then studies the blossom, first making several quick sketches before moving on to more detailed drawings and photos. After stretching and priming the canvas, Peggy draws directly on it before reaching for her paintbrush. Layers of paints and glazes slowly build up on the canvas, the process often taking a year or more, before the final image emerges. Working on several pieces at a time, there is never an empty easel in Peggy’s studio. Born in New York City, as a youth Peggy had a passion for drawing. At the age of ten, Peggy began going to a private art school where she learned to paint with oils. From there she attended the High School of Art & Design, followed by a year at The Academy of Art College in San Francisco and another year at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn N.Y. With flowers being Peggy’s most painted subject matter, in 1987 she moved to Maine where she built a garden of endless inspiration. After a 14-year stint working with woven tapestries, Peggy returned to painting in 2001. With both subtle and dramatic shifts in color and luminosity, Peggy’s work is not only awe-inspiring, but provides a unique snapshot of the natural beauty that surrounds us.

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Adam MacMillan

Adam MacMillan of Surfside Ceramic Studios works alongside his family creating stunning crystalline glazes on porcelain pottery. A high fire glaze process, crystalline glazes can be extremely difficult to produce, with only a few potters working in this technique. A combination of specific glaze formulation, application, and firing techniques, despite meticulous attention to detail, the results are often unpredictable. Firing the glazed work at about 2000 degrees Fahrenheit, the crystals that grow on the pottery are just like gems found in nature, with no two exactly alike. All of the pieces are hand thrown or slab formed and each is truly one of a kind. The crystals are permanent and will not fade or change over time, but due to the texture and porous nature of the surface, these pieces should not be used to store food. Adam, who studied mechanical engineering, is naturally drawn to working with clay. He enjoys the technical aspects of ceramics and has been making pots for 15 years. With a combined experience of over 90 years working in clay, the MacMillan family’s beautiful work can be found in galleries in Massachusetts and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Nancy Marland

Inspired by the many different aspects of nature, Nancy Marland finds herself particularly drawn to water. Seeking to capture the beauty inherent in its variety of organic shapes and forms, Nancy’s jewelry also reflects an admiration for the element itself. Creating wearable works of art, Nancy hopes each piece resonates with a deep and personal connection to our greatest life source. Working in a variety of metalsmithing techniques, Nancy’s work has evolved overtime. For the past 30 years she has worked as a self-employed graphic designer, serving many industries from technology to arts organizations and publishing. As a college student Nancy majored in painting and sculpture, earning her BFA from the Art Institute of Boston. After years of working on a computer, Nancy yearned to use traditional mediums again. She experimented with clay while still maintaining her graphic design business. This eventually led to an interest in working with silver metal clay and creating craft jewelry. While experimenting with this expressive medium, Nancy discovered a true passion and excitement for creating unique, contemporary jewelry and Nancy Marland Jewelry was born. Currently, she is drawn to metalsmith techniques, working with a tarnish-resistant Argentium sterling silver to which she often adds contrasting patinas and occasionally color with polymer. Living and working on Boston's north shore, Nancy has a deep connection with the ocean. Her work can be found in craft shows throughout Massachusetts and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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John McAlevey

John McAlevey’s furniture designs have evolved over the years into his personal and individual architectural style with clean graceful lines and broad appeal. He uses mostly domestic hardwoods, such as cherry, maple and walnut, and traditional joinery in the construction of his furniture. Mortise-and-tension joints are used where applicable, drawers are made with hand-cut dovetails and all the surfaces are scraped and hand-sanded. John uses a variety of finishes, but prefers a penetrating oil/varnish finish that allows the wood to obtain a deep natural color over a period of time. Recently John became interested in turning bowls on a lathe using solid pieces of green unseasoned wood from the New England forest, including cherry, maple, curly maple, ash and walnut. As the bowls dry they warp or distort slightly out of round, giving them a distinctive shape. Some of John’s bowls have a band of decorative carving. A few of these are milk painted in colors that compliment the natural wood tones. In 1962, John began to pursue the craft of woodworking and furniture design after seeing an exhibit featuring the work of contemporary craftsmen. He subsequently visited the workshops of these woodworkers and eventually worked in two of their shops. In 1965, John moved to Henniker, NH and became established woodworker designing and making furniture. He has been a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen since 1965 and was a founding member of the guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers. In 1993, John moved his home and workshop to mid-coast Maine where he continues to design and craft beautiful furniture, including custom woodworking.

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Daphne McDonald

Creating stunning contemporary jewelry that echoes the graceful curves, shapes and lines found in calligraphy, Daphne’s work reflects her interest in the creative process. From her necklaces and earrings to her bracelets and rings, every piece shows Daphne’s attention to detail and fascination with transforming an idea into a finished work of art. Starting with a flat piece of silver or gold, Daphne relies on her primary tool, a jeweler’s handsaw, to cut shapes into the metal. First she drills tiny holes into the interior of the piece that enable her to carefully saw the lines and open the shapes of her designs. Occasionally the shape or color of a stone will immediately influence Daphne’s work, but often many of her ideas take months to evolve. Having first dabbled in jewelry in the 6th grade when Daphne made a pin out of brass and silver, her fascination with metal smithing continued throughout the years. Although mainly self taught, Daphne has taken many workshops to learn specific techniques including most recently, hand crocheted chains. Crediting much of her creativity to her gifted mother, Daphne continues to make jewelry out of her studio in Rollinsford, NH. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Daphne’s work can be found in galleries and fairs throughout the northeast.

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Migrant Winds

Connie Barbour of Migrant Winds creates stunning silkscreened art with many themes about the human spirit, as well as a few other subjects that inspire me. Seeing the visual world as patterns overlapping and set in front of her, Connie tries to faithfully recreate these elements in her work. Each theme uses different patterns that are achieved through the silkscreen process. Also known as serigraphy or screen-printing, Silkscreen is a stencil-based process of printmaking in which a design is imposed on a screen of silk or other fine mesh. Using a tool called a squeegee, ink is passed through the open areas of the stencil creating precise designs on the printing surface. Several stencils can be used for a multi-colored print. All of the printing is done by Connie herself, “with TLC on acid neutral paper so that the prints can last for years.” Connie’s work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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Ty Minton

Ty Minton, a native of New Mexico, first studied art with his mother, Helen L. Minton, an accomplished Southwestern oil painter. He continued his art education at New Mexico State University and the University of Colorado where he studied botany, art and chemistry. Although his major work is in clay, Ty has worked in wood, handmade paper, fiber, metal, paint, graphics and photography. Much of his work reflects the influence of his interest in Southwestern Native American design and technique. Many of his clay works are finished with hand polished fine clay slip (Terra Sigellata) and painted with intricate stylized animal and plant designs. In addition to his artwork, he holds a doctorate in environmental studies. He views his combined career of environmentalist/artist as a natural outcome of his interest in both the function and the form of the natural world. Ty Minton is a juried member of the League of the New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Karen Mitchell

Karen handcrafts sterling silver jewelry that reflects her joy in the New England Seasons. A former block printmaker, Karen designs her “pierced” silver pieces much the same way she designed block prints, by removing shadows with her tiny saw blade and leaving the light. The eye fills in the details of her contemporary renderings of animals and natural textures. A New England native, Karen first studied studio art at Colby College and the University of Maine at Orono, focusing on printmaking, etching and block prints. Back in New Hampshire several years later, Karen took a jewelry making class at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Karen lives in Mont Vernon and is an active member of the Mont Vernon Artisans.

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William Mitchell

William Mitchell has been working on serigraph prints of the New Hampshire landscape since 1983. Bill gathers inspiration for his prints while hiking and skiing in New Hampshire. Each serigraph is printed by hand using traditional screenprinting techniques. Bill uses only one screen to achieve his prints using the block-out fluid method. After printing a color, the corresponding area of the screen is filled with glue or lacquer. The next sequential color is then printed on top of the previous. Bill enjoys demonstrating this process at craft fairs and teaching classes with the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Bill is a juried member of the League of New Hampsshire Craftsmen.

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Richard Morgan

Richard Morgan of The Painted Bird creates one-of-a-kind carved wooden shore birds that are patterned after authentic early American hunting decoys. Handmade from native woods and hand painted to resemble the aged patina of the antique decoys Richard gets his inspiration from, no two birds are alike. Always having a keen interest in the arts, Richard who was born in Conneticut, spent a good part of his childhood in the southwest where he was exposed to a variety of art classes. After returning to New England to attend The University of Hartford Art School, where he majored in wood sculpture, Richard went on to work in antiques restoration. After a request to make several copies of an old waterlegs bird carving, Richard went on to create dozens of skillfully crafted bird decoys. His work has been featured in several decorating magazines, books and on the cover of an LL Bean catalog. A natural expression of his reverence for wood and form, Richard’s work also echoes his appreciation for the craftsmanship of the past.

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Cheddy Moller

Cheddy Moller’s beautifully stained glass features landscapes, flowers, waterfowl and other New England birds in her unique three-dimensional designs and glowing colors. Cheddy’s exquisite designs and fine craftsmanship result in heirloom quality stained glass that will bring decades of enjoyment to its owner. Creating with glass is a long process. The glass is carefully chosen for each composition according to texture, color and opaqueness. Three patterns are made and then the glass is cut piece by piece with cutters and grozing pliers. The pieces are sanded, wrapped in copper tape and fitted back on the pattern. The work is then brushed with flux and soldered together, which is an art in itself! After cleaning, patina is applied to the solder in the final step. Cheddy always loved making things “pleasing, colorful and different.” As a child she studied oil painting and composition. As an adult, designing clothing was her priority. Motivated by the desire to have a stained glass lamp over the dining area table in their new log home, Cheddy enrolled in an adult education course to learn the basic skills of stained glass. By the end of the course, Cheddy had a new lamp and was “totally hooked” on her new hobby. After over 30 years, Cheddy still enjoys creating new deigns as well as the physical work this entails. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Cheddy’s work can be found in galleries across New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine.

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Elise Moran

Inspired by nature’s perfect design, Elise Moran of E*A*M* Studios creates stunning pendants and earrings out of solid sterling silver, 14k or 18k gold. Her jewelry not only reflects an appreciation of the natural world, but translates its infinite wonders into wearable works of art. Using traditional metalsmithing techniques, such as casting, Elise finishes each piece with a soft satin patina to emphasize the object’s form and enhance the color of the metal. Her jewelry also features beautifully handmade findings and closures. Graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in jewelry and light metals, Elise’s work can be found in various galleries and museum shops throughout the country.

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Susan Mulvey

Working as a jeweler for over 40 years, Susan strives to achieve beauty and simplicity of form in each one of her handcrafted pieces. From the curvature of the metal, to the placement of a stone, Susan's designs reflect a distinctive elegance and wide appeal. For Susan, the process of creating and watching that creation emerge is magical. Using different metals and stones, Susan constructs her jewelry in a variety of techniques including, forging, embossing, sawing and soldering. Occasionally the shape or color of a stone will influence Susan's designs, but often many of her pieces evolve naturally. Although mainly self taught, Susan's journey as a jeweler began at the Brookfield Craft Center where she learned the basics of metal smithing. Throughout her long career, Susan has returned to Brookfield as an apprentice and demonstrator further honing her skills. Susan has also attended both the Gemological Institute of America and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Susan's work can be found in galleries throughout the northeast.

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Hope Murphy

Working as a jeweler for over 40 years, Susan strives to achieve beauty and simplicity of form in each one of her handcrafted pieces. From the curvature of the metal, to the placement of a stone, Susan's designs reflect a distinctive elegance and wide appeal. For Susan, the process of creating and watching that creation emerge is magical. Using different metals and stones, Susan constructs her jewelry in a variety of techniques including, forging, embossing, sawing and soldering. Occasionally the shape or color of a stone will influence Susan's designs, but often many of her pieces evolve naturally. Although mainly self taught, Susan's journey as a jeweler began at the Brookfield Craft Center where she learned the basics of metal smithing. Throughout her long career, Susan has returned to Brookfield as an apprentice and demonstrator further honing her skills. Susan has also attended both the Gemological Institute of America and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Susan's work can be found in galleries throughout the northeast.

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Mystic Woodworks

Ray and Jamie Doubleday of Mystic Woodworks create functional wood products, each with a unique identity. Finding inspiration in where they live and the medium itself, Ray & Jamie’s work is often a direct reflection of nature — such as in their many leaf shaped boards. Other designs are a celebration of the wood itself as many of their designs highlight the natural colors of the varying woods. According to the artists, “the white of maple is striking in itself but when it is placed next to a piece of black walnut the combination becomes synergistic. Add the bright red of padauk, the golden tones of ash and oak with the earth tone of cherry and we have an explosion of beauty.” Celebrating 24 years of crafting high quality woodenware in beautiful mid coast Maine, Ray and Jamie are constantly surrounded by “spectacular natural beauty.” As an engineer, Ray is constantly looking for ways to improve their manufacturing process. Although the wood itself is a renewable resource, they don’t take their beloved medium for granted and try to maximize the use of the wood they acquire. “In everything we do we feel that it is nature, not we who is the artist.”

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Matthew Newton

Matthew "Matt" Newton of Fig Newton Wood Creations makes beautiful hand turned wooden bowls out of salvaged wood from fallen trees or those removed by lumber services. All of Matt’s bowls start their life as a raw, green log. Matt then cuts the log into segments with a chainsaw and mounts them on a lathe. After each piece is turned to a rough shape on the lathe, Matt sets them aside to dry. After about four to six months drying, Matt remounts each piece to finish turning. The lathe helps reveal each pieces own inner beauty and no two are alike as, according to Matt, “each tree has its own story to tell.” Having been woodworking for a number of years, Matt started out by making bookshelves and “watching every episode of the New Yankee Workshop.” Taking a course with Mike Dunbar at the Windsor Chair Institute peaked Matt’s interest in the medium and led him to the wonderful world of woodturning. After taking a class on making Windsor candle stands at Woodcraft, Matt began making these for friends and family. This eventually led him to try turning bowls. From then on, he was hooked, describing the process of seeing a bowl emerge from a plain log as “magic.” Working from his home studio in Hampton, NH, Matt’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Laury Nichols

Fashioning whimsical woodland animals and other custom sculptures, Laury Nichols truly enjoys the woodcarving process. A self-taught artist, Laury transforms ordinary blocks of wood into unique characters full of humor and personality. Laury prefers working with Northern white pine, basswood and occasionally cedar. Although wood carvers prefer using basswood due to its consistency and tight grain, Laury finds herself drawn to pine because it has greater variety and character. She also enjoys the sound and vibration of her tools make while carving into the wood. Because pine is more unpredictable and chip-out prone, Laury exercises extreme caution while carving fine details. After carefully carving each piece, Laury uses wood burning techniques to outline the carving before applying a base coat of colors. She then uses a variety of inks, paints, colored pencils and a final layer of clear nail polish to finish each piece. The multiple layers of color often give a raised look to Laury’s carvings. Carving for over 35 years, Laury sketches lots of ideas before choosing the best ones to develop. Relying a lot on her imagination, Laury is also inspired by classic children’s novels including, “The Wind in the Willows.” A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Laury has won several awards for her work. Her unique characters can be found in several galleries throughout the state.

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Wayne Noel

Wayne Noel is a custom woodworker with over 30 years’ experience in the craft. Using the traditional Shaker style and concept of utility as his backdrop, he adds unique accents to create individualized pieces that are both beautiful and functional. Wayne incorporates a combination of native New England hardwoods, such as oak, maple, cherry and ash, into his work. Conscious of the finite nature of such resources, Wayne repurposes smaller pieces of wood by incorporating them into the inlay of different, larger pieces. In this way, he works to maintain the sustainability of his craft while creating finished products that are as distinctive as the people who enjoy them.

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Elizabeth Nordgren

Elizabeth Nordgren creates lovely hand-painted silk scarves that feature fluid florals and abstract designs in a wide array of colors. Elizabeth is also well known as a masterful and innovative weaver. A native of Schenectady, New York, Elizabeth graduated from Syracuse University with a BFA in painting. After working as a commercial artist, Elizabeth moved to New Hampshire and began her fascination with manipulating colored yarns. Most of her current work is done using the painted warp technique, which grew out of her frustration with the limitations of traditional loom weaving. In some of her work, Elizabeth pours textile inks onto a single layer of warp; however, most often the warp is divided into two halves and hand-painted. The two halves are then woven together into a single wall hanging with intriguing textures that is visually mesmerizing. Elizabeth has won numerous awards for her weavings and has exhibited her work in juried craft shows throughout New England and beyond.

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Ritvaliisa Ojanen

Subtle color combinations of fresh water pearls, texture of the silver surface, size and shape of beads are the building blocks for Ritvaliisa Ojanen’s designs. Ideas for the jewelry slowly emerge when all the materials are in front of Ritvaliisa on her worktable. New designs spring from past experiments and combined with new solutions lending to one-of-a-kind pieces. Materials include glass beads, fresh water pearls, semi-precious stones and fine silver. Construction methods are a combination of seed bead weaving and stringing techniques. Ritvaliisa makes her own clasps and silver beads from metal clay using molding and hand forming techniques. Ritvaliisa applies a patina to the silver components to coordinate with the colors of the beads and pearls.

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Irina Okula

Irina Okula’s inspiration for the creation of her clay objects goes back to her long interest in Native American pottery. She loves the polished surfaces they produce without glazes and uses many of their techniques of construction and firing. After visiting pueblos in New Mexico and Arizona, Irina marveled at the beautiful landscapes. Her work echoes these influences. Large open bowls are thrown and then used as a canvas. Irina collects natural combustible materials to use in the firing process. The materials are placed in and around each piece where the fire and combustibles will dance upon the clay leaving exciting random marks. The patterns invoke the fiery chaos of nature, contrasted with the calm and serene patterns of cloudy skyscapes and geologic formations. Each bowl is one-of-a-kind and goes through many firings. Irina received a BA in Art from Fontbonne College and a MFA in Ceramics from Southern Illinois University. Irina is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Laurie Olson-Sabol

Laurie Olson-Sabol creates original lampworked glass bead jewelry combining her love of hotglass and her skill at metalsmithing. Her necklaces, bracelets and earrings feature one-of-a-kind round and elongated glass beads layered with vibrant color. Laurie’s design sense tends to be organic. Inspired by her natural surroundings, such as light on water, the color of flowers, clouds or fog, Laurie thinks about how she can create similar effects in glass or metal. Laurie loves color, especially transparent color. Having worked in many different mediums, Laurie feels at home in “Hot Glass” as she enjoys its’ freedom of color and form. Using a torch, she transforms rods of glass into beautiful beads. A self-taught lampworker, Laurie has been making glass jewelry for over ten years. Always interested in art, Laurie began designing and making jewelry in childhood. As a teenager, she bought her first torch and taught herself silversmithing. After graduating from the University of New Hampshire with a major in art, she attended Boston University’s Program in Artistry for advanced metal studies. While at BU, she did sculptural pieces in a variety of materials. Laurie has worked for several fine jewelry stores, including Shreve Crump and Lowe of Boston, doing goldsmithing and design work.

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Julia Parkhurst

Creating stunning one-of-a-kind earrings, pendants, rings and bracelets, Julia Parkhurst has been “Catching the Fancy” of jewelry lovers with her unique, wearable art. Hand crafted in silver, gold as well as beautiful precious and semi-precious stones, Julia’s work reflects her love of nature. As a child, she regularly accompanied her mother, a self-taught naturalist, on hikes to identify the birds, flowers and trees of northern Indiana. Trips to the sands dunes and beaches of nearby Lake Michigan gave way to awe and respect for the abundant animal and plant life there. After her retirement from a career in education as a teacher/administrator, Julia began to pursue a career in jewelry making. Teaching classes here at Exeter Fine Crafts and the New Hampshire Institute of Art, Julia has enjoyed the opportunity to introduce others to the medium. Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout the state.

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Eve Passeltiner

Eve Passeltiner has been traveling since she was three weeks old, making and selling art since she was six years old, and studying science since she was ten. First introduced to stained glass while she was the founding director of The Moab Arts & Recreation Center in Utah, it wasn’t until Eve visited Bermuda that she discovered kiln-formed glass. Inspired by the vibrant landscape of Utah, Eve strives to capture that subtle dynamic in her glass art. Her childhood in New York City, travels around the world, and fascination with Native American arts have also influenced her designs. Eve has taken classes with master glass artists at The Studio at The Corning Museum of Glass and at Worcester Center for Craft. In addition, she studied sculpture at The Arts Students League of New York, ceramics at the Hui No’eau Visual Arts Center in Maui and textile arts with many individual artisans.

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Joel Paul

Joel Paul of 13 Stars Design creates elegant shaker style furniture and other handcrafted items including cutting boards, tools and keepsake boxes. Using the natural properties of the wood to create timeless and harmonious, heirloom treasures, Joel takes comfort in knowing that he can create items that will stand the test of time. Inspired by Shaker furniture, Joel’s work echoes it’s simple, yet timeless design. Much of his work highlights the natural color and texture of the wood itself. Often astounded by the amount of workable material wasted during home renovations, Joel’s company prides itself on utilizing reclaimed materials. Working not only with local antique wood dealers to obtain rare woods such as chestnut, Joel also creates pieces made from local wood. This attention to design and materials results in some truly stunning pieces. Working out of his Salmon Falls studio, Joel’s work can be found at fine craft shows around the state and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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John & Susan Pearsall

John and Susan Pearsall of Pearsall and Sons Goldsmiths meticulously handcraft gold and silver jewelry. Their work includes contemporary pieces with clean graceful lines and breathtaking one-of-a-kind pieces that feature precision engraving, gemstones, and pearls. Precious metal is shaped with hand tools, then braised or welded at the joints before being textured or hammered into final shapes. Creating jewelry for over 35 years, Pearsall and Sons Goldsmiths include three generations. John’s late father was part of the business as was his son. Susan is the chief designer of the more figurative pieces – flowers and birds that are sculpted in wax and cast by the lost wax process. John and Susan are longtime members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Bruce Peck

Bruce Peck is an American printmaker who was born and raised in India. He holds degrees in Political Science and Biology, but pursued a career in etching after taking a printmaking course at Southern Illinois University. He has been making etchings for over 20 years, exploring in detail the beauty and character of the New England landscape. Bruce etches and prints all of his copper plates himself and hand colors the resulting prints. He is committed to creating etchings of the finest quality using traditional techniques and modern archival materials. The artist works from his printmaking studio in E. Topsham, Vermont and is represented by galleries in New England and India. He has also produced numerous etchings of India where he lives for part of the year. Bruce creates his etchings by drawing the image with a needle on a copper plate that is covered with an acid resistant coating. The plate is then placed in an acid solution to etch the lines drawn by the artist. The plate is cleaned and covered with ink. The excess ink is wiped off carefully, leaving some ink trapped in the etched lines. The inked plate is placed on the press bed, covered with paper, and pulled through the press. The heavy pressure of the etching press forces the paper against the plate and transfers the ink to the paper to create the etching. After the print is dry, it is hand colored with watercolor. Bruce prints his etchings in limited signed editions on 100% rag print paper. Each original etching is hand pulled and hand colored by the artist. Framed pieces are mounted with acid free materials in black metal frames. Bruce's etchings are also available in black and white without the handcoloring.

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Evelyn Pelati

Evelyn Pelati is an American artist living in Connecticut. Her designs are the result of her fascination with the Arts and Crafts and Art Deco periods along with her own unique artist vision. Evelyn finds inspiration from architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Charles Rennie Mackintosh; the metalwork of Stickley, Dirk van Erp, Tiffany and more; and the art deco fashion designs of Erté. Atter designing and fabricating her jewelry, Evelyn then hand finishes each and every piece... including soldering, polishing and imparting her signature vintage look. Evelyn is proud to be a Roycroft Renaissance Master Artisan. This honor carries with it the responsibility to create handcrafted work that upholds the legacy of the iconic American arts organization, the Roycrofters. The Roycroft's creed is, "A belief in working with the head, hand, and heart and mixing enough play with the work so that every task is pleasurable and makes for health and happiness." Working in her home studio, Evelyn is proud to be a part of the resurgence of "Made in the U.S.A." pride.

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Hannah Phelps

A northern New England native, award-winning printmaker Hannah Phelps creates relief prints that are a result of her continuous exploration of the local landscape and forces at work there. With either watercolor and a wooden spoon or oil ink and an etching press, Hannah creates stunning seascape and landscape prints using plein air paintings as inspiration and reference. Many of her prints are created using the white line woodcut process. Using a sketch Hannah draws on paper, she transfers the image onto a piece of wood. She then carves into the outlines of the piece creating the “white-lines” in the final print. The wood left untouched now stands in relief from the lines. Hannah attaches a piece of paper to the edge of the woodblock to ensure that it lays on the wood the same way each time she places it against the block in a process called, “registration”. Hannah then inks one shape with watercolor using a brush to apply the paint. She flips the paper down on the block then uses the back of a spoon to transfer the paint onto the paper. She repeats this process until all of the shapes are impressed on the paper. Once satisfied with the image, Hannah removes it and prepares for the next print. “The block can be printed several times, but no two will ever really be alike, so each piece becomes a combination of print and original painting.” A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Hannah’s work can be found in galleries and exhibitions throughout the country.

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Mary North Phillips

Mary North Phillips, creator of Posh Pockets, works out of her Exeter, New Hampshire studio, creating elegant collections of handbags, with a variety of fabrics and styles, to suit all tastes. Every one of Mary’s limited edition, handcrafted bags are made with high quality fabric or leather personally chosen by the artist herself. Each bag, with sizes ranging from small clutches to large totes, is fully lined and many include hand-made dust bags for storage. With a Master of Fine Arts in Sculpture from the University of Wisconsin, Mary approaches the design of her bags as if she were creating a three-dimensional piece of art. Inspired by volume and form, Mary’s handbags have clean lines that reflect modern, architectural shapes, while maintaining an overall classic appeal. More than an everyday accessory, Mary’s unique handbags are functional works of art.

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Lauren Pollaro

Lauren Pollaro has always been intrigued by color and the relationships colors have to one another. Through jewelry, she presents color as it combines with texture, pattern, and shape. These pieces become collages composed of original acrylic paintings on paper, metals, stones, glass and found objects. Each of these elements is manipulated to create numerous designs. The design, usually a shape and a color, becomes the foundation for each piece. Another shape might be added to form another level and then a palette of various materials is gathered to build or assemble a harmonious design. Many pieces have incorporated some type of landscape which gives a feeling of the sea, desert or mountain as land meets sky. Lauren was born in Brooklyn, NY, and has a BA in Fine Arts from UNH. Lauren is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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The Poppy Seed

Bill and Sallie Ellis of The Poppy Seed create copper wind chimes that are a pleasure to see as well as hear. With many themes including: animals, nautical, foliage and more, all the artwork is hand cut and formed. After cutting each piece and stringing the wind chime together, the copper is then treated to seal it, which darkens the metal and protects it from weathering. Having made wind chimes for more than twenty-five years, Sallie also creates natural wax candles out of palm and soy wax. Members of the Society of Southern Maine Craftsmen, their work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout Maine and New Hampshire.

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Allison Randall

Allison Randall of Friendly Goods has been designing and making her distinctive cloth Soothing Toys for over 35 years. She initially created them for her own children and as gifts for them to give at birthday parties. The creations were enthusiastically received and Allison’s business began as enthusiastic parents wanted to buy the items she made. Much of the cloth Allison uses is recycled or re-used, either from old or cast-off clothing, or given to her by friends or acquaintances who knew Allison liked to sew. Her designs and materials work together to comfort and delight people of all ages, adults and children alike. Believing that it is important to take care of adults much in the same way as children, some of Allison’s toys go to hospice patients or others in distress, to lighten their hearts in difficult times. The feel of the toys, soft and giving, is as important as the design. These toys are not to be put on the shelf and forgotten. They are for holding and squeezing, for hugging and feeling. Allison choose the name, “Friendly Goods,” to express all this and to also pun on the fact that she is a Quaker or “Friend.”

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Susan Ratnoff

Working almost exclusively in hardwoods including: cherry, oak, maple, tiger maple, paduk, wenge and black walnut, Susan Ratnoff of Taking Shape Designs creates stunning fine furniture and home accessories. Inspiration for each of Susan’s individually handcrafted pieces comes from the very woods itself. Strongly influenced by the Shaker, Mission and Arts and Crafts movements, Susan combines the geometric aspects of those styles using contrasting woods that not only compliment the timber’s natural features, but accentuate them. Although Susan often uses clear finishes/oils on cherry, walnut and maple to enhance the wood's natural beauty, she will stain or paint other woods to provide a greater variety of color combinations and designs. A retired school administrator, Susan has been crafting woodworks for over 30 years. Although she thoroughly enjoyed working with friends on woodworking projects both large and small (homebuilding and finish carpentry under the guidance of a master craftsman teacher), she knew that pursuing a career in education would be equally satisfying and more practical. When she officially retired in 2008, Susan created Taking Shape Designs to allow her earlier training and passion for woodworking to blossom. Initially working solely on commissioned based projects, Susan has expanded her work to include one-of-a-kind cutting/serving boards, lazy Susans, mirrors, tables and a variety of other woodcrafts.

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Wen Redmond

Working from a process that involves an ongoing dialogue between her chosen media, intuition and innovative fiber photography work, Wen creates stunning mixed media fiber art including scarves, encaustic works and her well-known, unique wall pieces. Merging photography, digital printing, collage, surface design and fiber, Wen creates one-of-a-kind works of art. An experienced quilter, Wen’s work is often biographical or journalistic in nature as she works out of insight, inspiration, feeling and reactions to the outer world. She often works in layers, using non-traditional quilting techniques to transform scraps of fiber and photography into contemporary works of art. Wen has created several signature techniques including: Holographic Images, Textured Photographs, Digital Fiber and Serendipity Collage Technique. She delights in creating dialogue, changing perspectives and perceptions of fiber. Lately, she has extended her media to create stunning encaustic works that combine fabrics and original photographic images with hot beeswax and resin. Wen has won numerous awards for her work, recently including: 2nd place at the Infinity Art Gallery, Best in Fiber at the 2012 League of NH Craftsmen, “Living with Crafts” exhibit, “Best in Two Dimensional Design,” at a 2011 League of NH Craftsmen Show and was a Niche finalist three times. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsman for over 20 years, she has authored many articles that have been published in books and magazines, appeared on DVD workshops and been featured on Quilting Arts television. Wen’s work can also be found in galleries, juried and solo art shows, internationally.

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Malea Rhodes

Malea Rhodes is a graduate of East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. She has studied ceramics, surface design and firing methods since 1997, honing her craft in wheel thrown porcelain with attention to delicate surface treatments. Each pot is thrown on a potter’s wheel, trimmed, carved, inlaid and scalloped by hand. No two pots are ever exactly alike. Some pieces have raised details, called slip trailing, added while the pots are still damp to the touch. The process for a single pot from start to finish takes around 10-14 days including firings. Each piece is fired twice in her kiln to ensure durability. Most glazes are mixed in house and all are food safe.

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Cathy & Dave Robinson

For over 45 years, Dave and Cathy Robinson have created works of beauty for use in our everyday lives. Their colorful, functional and decorative pottery is characterized by their signature band of multiple colors that flows across and around their pieces. Inspired by nature, the Robinsons’ designs often evoke the rolling hills of New England, the ocean or sky. While largely self taught, the Robinsons’ art was influenced by an earlier generation of New Hampshire potters who were essential to the formative development of their craft. Cathy and Dave opened Robinson studios to the public in the mid-60’s. Their home, studios and kilns, which they built themselves, are located on 30 wooded acres surrounded by the foothills of the White Mountains. The Robinsons are members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Steve & Sue Russell

The Russells believe that through the artist’s skill, aesthetics and passion, clay can be transformed into three-dimensional object of art. The couple have been influenced by backcountry camping trips to the canyon lands of the southwest, Art Nouveau and Deco, psychedelic poster art of the 1960’s and their admiration of ancient and modern pottery. The Russells’ pottery includes bowls, casseroles, drinking vessels, French butter keepers and vases. They also make stunning Raku fired vases with dramatic swirls of intense color. Many of the pieces are incised with botanical or free flowing geometric designs. Steve is a native Californian. There he met Sue, born and raised in New Hampshire. In 2003, they moved to New Hampshire where the natural beauty of their surroundings created a peaceful space in which to live and work. The Russells are members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Adele Sanborn

Combining her love of mixed media, watercolors and photography into meaningful messages, Adele Sanborn of Corningstone Design creates touching calligraphic art, often on her own handmade paper. Dedicating over 30 years to the fine art of lettering, Adele works at her studio, “Twiggs,” nestled on a hill overlooking farmland and the Merrimack River in Boscawen, NH. Surrounded by the idyllic scenery, Adele’s studio gives her the space and tranquility to create and explore new and diverse ideas in the craft of ink, paper and photography. A self-taught folk artist, Adele has been a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen since 1975. Trained as a technical photographer, Adele was delighted to discover alternative ways of developing photos, including Polaroid transfers and Lazertran copy material. "It's created a great way to combine my photography with my love of calligraphy," she explains. Born and raised in Long Island, NY, Adele received a BFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology and moved to Boscawen, NH in the early '70s. She and her husband dairy farmed together until 1984 when Adele started Cornerstone Design. Also a juried member of the New Hampshire Art Association and the WCA of NH, Adele’s work can be found in galleries throughout New England.

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Deanne Sanville

Drawing from traditional techniques, yet still incorporating her own unique features, Deanne Sanville of the Lilac Dragonfly creates stunning hand woven baskets. Incorporating hardwood bases inside the basket and runners on the bottom, Deanne uses fine hardwoods for the handles and lids. Rather than work with a mold, Deanne free-weaves her baskets, using an Indian cross-stitch, instead of staples or nails, to bind the rim. She then finishes each basket with brass tacks and rivets, and incorporates harness leather in some designs like her Lidded Baskets. Finally, Deanne rubs each basket with non-toxic lemon-bean oil that enhances the subtleties of the wood and allows the baskets to be food-safe.

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Julie Schmidt

A largely self-taught metalsmith, Julie fuses sterling silver, copper and brass into elegant, yet whimsical jewelry. Inspired by movement, texture and form, Julie creates unique pins, pendants, earrings and bracelets. Each piece is either hammered, heat treated or stitched together into stunning works of art. The inspiration behind her signature stitching technique came from Julie’s grandparents who were missionaries in Africa. As a child, Julie received several African relics that later influenced her early designs. Although the tribal, primitive feel of Julie’s work has evolved over the years, the organic essence has remained. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Julie’s work can be found in galleries across the country. Julie is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Erica Schlueter

Combining various fabric textures and riveting, Erica Schlueter of Bent Metal creates contemporary sterling silver and 18k bi-metal jewelry that is as unique as it is beautiful. Erica meticulously joins the pieces of her jewelry together using rivets, a technique of firmly securing pieces of metal together, without the use of solder. The rivets themselves become integral elements in her designs. With a background in textile design and a BFA in Fiber, Erica also uses patterns to create visual depth within her work. Similar to block printing on fabric, Erica uses metal stamps and actual fabric textures to emboss her jewelry. The textured pieces are then collaged together using rivets. In some of her work, Erica also uses silk embroidery and crochet to join and embellish the metal. By combining these techniques, Erica creates distinct pieces of jewelry that have a wide appeal.

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Arlene Simon

Using elegant fabrics in a variety of textures and weights, Arlene Simon of Davina Designs creates beautiful scarves, arm warmers and hats. Each Art-to-Wear hat is hand crafted. The hats are made of unusual fabrics that are visually interesting in colors and textures that coordinate with most winter coats. The inherent properties of each unique fabric determine how the hats will be constructed and whether they are 3-season hats or primarily cold weather wearable. Arlene Simon is a self-taught craftsman with a background in textile design and business. She studied at Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science and New York University Stern School of Business. Previously Arlene designed and manufactured children’s outerwear. Additionally, her background working in architecture lends structural lines and defined shapes to her designs.

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Nisa Smiley

Nisa Smiley’s love of the environment and her native coastal Maine is evident in her nature inspired and earth friendly line of jewelry. Her mussel shell necklaces and earrings are created using a painstaking process of filing and polishing the shell to bring out its translucence and then enclosing the shell in resin for durability. Breakage in this process can be frustrating when dealing with something as delicate as a shell and so many shells do not make it to the final part of the process. This consists of setting the strengthened shell in a sterling silver bezel frame. The final product is a wearable testament to the beauty in nature’s own elegant designs.

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Lochlin Smith

Drawing inspiration from his Celtic ancestry, as well as Aztec, Egyptian and Aboriginal Designs, Lochlin Smith creates stunning, contemporary jewelry. From his necklaces, bracelets and earrings to his watches and mobiles, every piece is created in bronze and given a variety of finishes including antique silver and several colored patinas. Twisting, torching, pounding and shaping bronze rods and sheets, Lochlin’s jewelry captures his fascination with nature, echoing the graceful curves and earthy colors of the natural world. Employing both traditional and original methods to create his pieces, Lochlin works from his Vermont studio and is a juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen and The Boston Society of Arts & Crafts.

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Matthew Smith

Matthew Smith of Quincy Pond Printworks is a printmaker. A former commercial fishing boat captain, Matthew now translates his love of the sea and admiration of marine life into etchings printed from copper plates. As the captain of the Charlotte G back in the 1980’s, Matthew’s mission was to catch and bring back as many fish as possible, as safely and efficiently as possible. Matthew made innovative nets to catch haddock and halibut in the North Atlantic. He put together the best fishing-boat crews to deploy the gear he made. He followed his instincts to go to places on the Georges’ Banks where the fish were, but the other fishermen were not. As an artist, he created a new way to make prints – copper block etching – that combines the top features of intaglio etching and relief printing to best portray the incredible color, depth and texture found in his work. Matthew gave up his life at sea for a life on paper, paper he impresses, one sheet at a time, with his copper block etchings of fish, crabs, turtles and all sorts of other sea and shore creatures. Matthew hopes that his works will be a gentle reminder of the magnificence of our oceans and the fragile circle of life on this planet we all share. Matthew is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Sarah Smith

Using the technique paper marbling to create dazzling colors and textures on her notebooks, gift cards and more, Sarah Smith is carrying on an ancient tradition. Paper Marbling is the process of floating paint on a medium of carrageenan (a sea weed extract) and water. The paint is then drawn with a series of tools to produce a wide variety of one-of-kind prints. No two are alike and each one is a unique work of art. The art of marbling began in the Mid-East almost 1,000 years ago and was practiced in Europe in the 1600’s. Marbling became an important part of bookbinding and continues to be used in the construction of fine handmade books.

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Linda Sorenson

Linda Sorensen’s lifelong passion for making things has led to a full-time career of handcrafting gold and silver jewelry. Her artistic medium changed radically during her last semester at the University of New Hampshire when, as a drawing and printmaking major, she enrolled in a beginning jewelry course in order to satisfy 3 remaining credit requirements and a gap in her schedule. That chance encounter led to further jewelry study at the Institute of Arts and Sciences in Manchester, New Hampshire, along with private study and professional workshops and juried membership in the prestigious League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Today Linda works her hammers, anvils and torches on a hilltop in New Hampshire's White Mountains. Her jewelry designs reflect the rich texture and love of color found in her earlier work. Using silver, gold and semi-precious cabochon stones, Sorensen creates earrings, necklaces, pins and bracelets with a balanced proportion and classic simplicity. Linda’s work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Barbara Sperling

Creating contemporary work with intricate detail not often found in polymer clay, Barbara makes stunning pendants and earrings. Millefiori canework is the process of building a log with a picture running through it, essentially, creating a 2-D picture with 3-D rods of clay. Having been asked how she can figure out the detail in her work, Barbara replies that in her mind, she envisions what she needs to do to make that spatial relationship. Similar to a puzzle, Barbara breaks the polymer clay into many small parts, making them lengthwise into a log and then combining them into a wider log. A laborious process, often taken two weeks to complete, Barbara begins each piece with a millefiori cane. To create the cane, Barbara begins by mixing all the colors of the clay she will need, then making individually logs of the designs that will make up the image. Each individual feather of a bird or petal of a flower must be made into a log of clay first. She reduces these pieces in size by stretching or rolling the cane, then tightly packing each piece together to form a larger cane. The finished result can be reduced in size again allowing the many applications and detail that you see in Barbara’s work. After forming the jewelry pieces, they are baked in a convection oven at 265 degrees. Attracted to the beautiful colors, Barbara began working with polymer clay in 1994, after seeing some blue swirled beads. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Barbara's work can be in galleries throughout the state.

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Lee Spiller

Lee Spiller has long been drawn to the rocky shores and beautiful islands of New England. Inspired to make his stone flower vases from the summer wildflowers that grew above the cobblestone beaches, Lee creates a variety of natural stone products from his vases and lamps, to his votives and business card holders. Carefully selecting his stones from remote beaches of the stormy North Atlantic that have been naturally shaped by countless years of tumbling in surf and rapids, Lee carefully cuts and drills each piece with modern diamond tools. He then seals each stone with a stone specific sealant that enhances their color and signs each piece. According to Lee, “each piece is made with a profound love and respect for nature.” Having worked naturally occurring stone into pleasing and useful objects since 1990, Lee’s work can be found in fine galleries and shops across the country. Lee is also a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Gary Starr

Gary Starr turns Vermont basswood into a variety of birds and fish ranging from miniature bird ornaments to full-sized standing sculptures. Gary’s process begins by studying the bird or fish he’s planning. He draws preliminary sketches, often from photos, before he hand carves and paints each of his authentic creations. Gary’s exquisite decoys represent a large variety of birds such as ducks, loons, nuthatches, snow geese and sand pipers. He’s added game fish to his collection, including salmon, trout and bass. Gary’s style captures the simplicity in form of the “old decoy tradition” while incorporating observations of the birds and fish in nature. His wooden bird ornament selection of several different species has become a collector’s item throughout the country. Each of the carvings is created and signed by Gary in his Weybridge, Vermont studio. Gary grew up in a home that had over 2,000 decoys! In 1956, at 9 years old, Gary carved his first black duck with his father, Dr. George Ross Starr of Duxbury, MA. (who later wrote two books on carving and decoys.) Gary developed his skill largely at his father’s side. A graduate of Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration, Gary spent the first part of his adult life in the hotel and food services industry before becoming a full-time artist. It became important to him to reconnect with his family heritage. In 1986, Gary started his successful one-man company, “Starr Decoys.”

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Daryl Storrs

Creating lithographic jewelry, Vermont printmaker, Daryl Storrs, also creates woodcuts and pastel drawings. Creating beautiful pins and earrings, each piece of jewelry is an original lithograph. Drawn to size, the images are hand printed by Daryl herself from a metal plate onto thick cotton paper. She then hand colors each piece with light-fast inks. After applying several layers of varnish, Daryl mounts the miniature print onto anodized aluminum. Having been a printmaker for 35 years, Daryl was first introduced to etching in college. Not only enthralled with the various steps involved in creating a metal plate, the ability to create multiple works of art from a single plate appealed to Daryl’s practical side. After college, she apprenticed with Sabra Field and learned the art of woodcuts. Inspired to return to school after two years of working, Daryl earned a master’s degree in printmaking from UMass Amherst. Returning to Vermont, Daryl waitressed briefly to pay the bills. Initially making paper earrings, she started selling them to customers who saw her wearing them in the restaurant. Her business grew and she was thankfully able to end her waitressing career. During this time, Daryl applied to the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, NH and was awarded a six-week printmaking residency. Moving to Huntington Vermont 23 years ago, Daryl converted an old barn on her property that now serves as her beautiful studio. Daryl’s time is divided between making woodcuts, jewelry and pastels — all of which focus on the Vermont landscape. Her work can be found in galleries throughout Vermont and New Hampshire.

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Mary Margaret Sweeney

Mary Margaret Sweeney is best known for her beautiful etchings with details so precise and intricate that they are often mistaken for photographs. She is inspired by the New England landscape and one can sense Mary Margaret’s deep connection with all of her subjects. Her images of mountains, forests, coastal scenes, interiors and animals are both visually stunning and contemplative. Mary’s printmaking process begins with a metal plate (copper, zinc, or brass) which is covered with an acid-proof coating. She sketches onto the plate and once the process is complete, ink is rubbed into the etched lines. The surface is wiped clean and the plate is printed. Each signed and numbered hand pulled print is an original work of art. Mary studied at The Chicago Art Institute and the University of New Hampshire. Her work is exhibited nationally and internationally. Mary Margaret is a juried member of Boston Printmakers, the New York Society of American Graphic Artists, the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and the New Hampshire Art Association.

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Joan Szoke

Noted for her unique botanical arts including pressed flower illustrations, pen and ink and watercolor nature prints, Joan Szoke of Remembered Gardens relies on her musical training for the composition of line, form, harmony and contrast in her work. Her beautiful flower pieces are delicately arranged into unique designs. Using only real flowers and plant materials in her art, Joan uses a wide range of flowers grown from seed. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Joan has not only taught workshops about the pressed flower technique, but also displays her work at galleried throughout the state.

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Terri Talas

Terri Talas’s work offers an extraordinary window into the natural world through one-of-a-kind pendants and sculptures, created in rare fossilized materials, including prehistoric mammoth ivory and naturally shed caribou antler. Known for her exquisite workmanship, Terri’s pendant carvings are created in ancient wooly mammoth ivory that is harvested annually from the permafrost in Northern Alaska, Siberia and the depths of the North Sea. The rich color variations in the fossilized materials reflect mineralization over thousands of years. According to Terri, “ancient fossil materials are mysteries – not one will be the same in color or texture and I never know what an inner layer will unfold.” Primarily a self-taught artist, Terri has been creating a wide variety of naturalistic art for over thirty years. Originally drawn to more traditional mediums, Terri swapped her paint brush for a chisel, carving into granite before moving on to bone materials. While working as the Lead Artist for the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management, Terri won numerous awards for her murals and artwork. Her permanent installations include murals in the lobbies of Heritage Park Museums in Massachusetts and a diorama background at the Concord Art Museum. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Terri’s work was featured recently in the League’s Continuing the Tradition Exhibit and a juried exhibit at the Nebraska Great Plains Museum.

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David Taylor

David Taylor creates turned bowls, segmented wooden vases, wine stoppers, key chains and more from local hardwoods, including maple, cherry and ash. All of David’s bowls are turned in a variety of shapes and sizes and can be used in the kitchen or for display. His segmented vases, wine stoppers, pendants, key chains and more are created with a variety of woods for both everyday use and aesthetic appeal. Every one of David’s pieces are one-of-a-kind, signed by the artist and sealed with either a food-safe beeswax or clear finish/oil to accentuate the wood’s natural beauty. Working from his home studio in Kingston, NH, David’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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William Taylor

Designing beautiful jewelry boxes in a stunning array of styles, William Taylor enjoys featuring the wood's grain. Preferring highly figured woods with prominent natural features, each one of William’s meticulously designed boxes are solid wood, environmentally friendly and built to be passed on to other generations. Having grown up a farm boy in Illinois, William served aboard the USS Boston then went back to school and was hired as an engineer. He found his calling in X-Ray medical systems and spent 40 years in New England hospitals installing and servicing those systems. Believing that building things is in his DNA, after retiring, William found woodworking satisfied his need to create. A member of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers as well as the League New Hampshire Craftsmen, William’s jewelry boxes can be found in fine craft galleries across the state.

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Sibylle & Ron Tornow

The graceful shapes and elegant sumi-e style of brush work of Sibylle's pottery has long been inspired by nature and her love of flowers. For years, the popular Peach Blossom and Blue Leaf pottery have been added to collections. A new style, the Botanical Impressions, is decorated by pressing Sibylle's own herbs, flowers and leaves in wet clay. Sibylle established her pottery business in 1981. She was introduced to clay by a friend. Sibylle says, "touching the clay for the first time gave me a feeling that I enjoy today." In 1986, her husband, Ron, joined her. Ron and Sibylle both studied fine art and graphic design in Europe and the United States. A watercolor artist, Sibylle has also studied fashion design at the Fashion Institute of Technology in NYC. The Tornows are members of the New Hampshire Potters Guild and the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Michael Trimpol

Michael Trimpol of Little River Hot Glass began his career as a glassblower in 1983 at the Sheridan College School of Craft and Design in Mississauga, Ontario. From his studio in the mountains of Vermont, he has continued to refine his skills by creating beautiful blown glass and participating and hosting glass workshops with leading glass artist from around the world. According to Michael, “I have a strong preference for objects of a personal scale and with potential utility. A vessel with a lid or stopper has always been of most interest. Color and pattern are also important, either a single pure color highlighting form or a more complex mixture to create patterns. I am proud of the final product but the actual process of creation is what I find most satisfying.”

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Lars & Connie Turin

Ceramic artists Lars and Connie Turin of Lars Turin Clayworks began their collaboration both professional and in life in 2012. Prior to meeting Connie, Lars worked as an art instructor, but his first love was always creating pottery. Working under the guise of “Hillplace Pottery,” Lars perfected his technique while also teaching and raising his family. Connie’s fascination with ceramics began in high school. She spent her summers as a potter’s apprentice, only to shift gears and head in other directions until she and Lars began collaborating. Utilizing his skill on the potters wheel, Lars creates incredible one-of-a-kind textural vessels by employing a technique that forces the clay surface to fracture as he expands and refines the form. Working in a variety of clays and pottery techniques, Lars unique sculptural pieces are often created with a central theme, connecting nature and people while highlighting the dynamics between them. Connie focuses on a variety of hand building methods. Like Lars, she uses the fracturing technique to create more organic vases and bowls. Inspired by color, Connie’s interest in surface treatments can be seen in her intricate sgraffito pieces and hand painted ‘story’ cups and bowls. Living and working in Southern Maine has captured the hearts and creative minds of the pair who continue to explore both the coast of Maine and their love of ceramic fine art and craft. Members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, their work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Caterina Urrata

Passionate about glassmaking, Caterina Urrata and David Weintraub of Fiamma Art Glass create a wide variety of work that range from sculptural to functional. From linear threadlike patterns to dynamic colors and forms, each one their pieces capture the fluidity of molten glass, preserving the fleeting moment. Initially working as professional flameworkers, a technique that involved the manipulation of glass through the use of a torch, the pair branched out into glass blowing, casting and other traditional processes. This is reflected in work that is often technically complex while still aiming for simplicity and elegance in design.

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Peter Vanderlaan

Passionate about glassmaking, Mary Beth Bliss and Peter VanderLaan create a variety of work that ranges from functional to sculptural. Each of their creations, whether it is Mary Beth’s jewelry or Peter’s blown works, convey an appreciation of technique, complexity of color, and a keen eye for the aesthetic. The couple’s earliest work combined Peter’s magnificent blown forms with Mary Beth’s intricately etched glass layers. A vast spectrum of technical and design possibilities were further explored by the duo for both individual and joint work. Mary Beth and Peter began working together over 30 years ago when they designed and built a glass studio and shop in La Cienega, New Mexico. Guadalupe Glass was founded in 1993 where they built a reputation creating incredible works of glass. The couple was drawn to New Hampshire where Mary Beth spent her teenage years farming trees with her parents. Mary Beth and Peter are members of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Carol VanLoon

Carol Van Loon is a black and white photographer who sees a world full of contrasts, forms and patterns. Using her vision to capture evocative scenes of environments and structures, Carol’s work conveys stillness, permanence and sometimes abandonment. Growing up on a farm in western New York, Carol was surrounded by the scenic beauty of rural life. This farm shaped her vision and became her first photographic subject. After the loss of her mother and a dear friend, Carol abandoned her photography in mourning. Then, after taking a spontaneous journey back to her roots, her memories conjured long forgotten stories. As she took photos of barns, the subject matter of her youth, she realized that as much as she had strayed from her beginnings, “the sensibilities that were formed there could lead me to the next chapter of my life.” By combining the many images she had taken and the story of her journey, Carol’s Barn book came about. The book pays homage to the gifts her parents gave her, the farm she grew up on and the vanishing landscape of my childhood. Earning a BFA in Photography from Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, NY, Carol is a member of the New Hampshire Art Association, the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists. Her work has been shown in numerous group and solo shows.

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Horace Varnum

Horace Varnum of Artasia produces intricate, handmade, fretwork wooden ornaments. Spending his time in the woodshop doing all the wood preparation, cutting and finishing, his wife Noella, the other half of the Artasia team, oversees the inventory, packaging and shipping. Cut on a scroll saw, Horace makes all his ornaments from New England rock maple. Once the wood has been selected and prepared to size, Horace glues the pattern to the face of the wood. He drills small pilot holes through specific locations where cuts are to be made. For each cut, Horace must painstakingly thread the saw blade through the pilot hole, reattaching it to the scroll saw arm and setting the blade tension. This step is repeated for each cut. The ornament is then carefully sanded, finished with a clear sealer and initialed by the Horace. Since 1993, Artasia has produced thousands of handcrafted clocks, wall hangings and fretwork gift items. During the mid 1990's, Artasia's line of fretwork Christmas tree ornaments grew in popularity and demand and by 1998 it was necessary to focus attention almost exclusively on its growing collection of rock maple ornaments. Now, with over 500 designs to choose from, Artasia offers one of the finest lines of hand cut fretwork ornaments available.

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T. Breeze Verdant

Creating beautiful designs with woods, Paua abalone and fine metals, T. Breeze Verdant’s work echoes the natural landscape with compelling colors and patterns. A self-taught marquetry artist, T. Breeze (the “T” stands for Tom) uses very thin veneers, creating elaborate images and landscapes on boxes, guitars, jewelry and small tabletops. Not one to continue producing the same item over and over again, T. Breeze works in cycles, with his designs constantly evolving. Marquetry is the art of applying pieces of veneer to a surface to form decorative patterns, designs or pictures. This process allows T. Breeze to work with rare woods without using much. "Little material travels through my studio doors," he says. "I like to work with veneers because there's no sawdust, no waste. They're sliced, not sawn. A piece of wood 1” thick produces 40 slices of veneer. I can create the greatest amount of beauty from the least amount of wood." T. Breeze’s aim has always been to create and share the beauty of wood while consuming very little of it. He started his woodworking experience by building a log cabin from his own trees and rocks and even built a second home using only materials from demolished buildings. This sentiment is carried on with T. Breeze’s art today as much of his work is made from scavenged and recycled woods. A jack of many trades, T. Breeze has been a full-time marquetry artist since 1988. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, his work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the country.

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Tim Ward

Putting a new spin on an old medium, Tim Ward has developed a new method for using stained glass to portray stunning scenery. Eliminating the lead or copper that is traditionally used to join stained glass pieces together, Tim’s method allows the colors and patterns in the glass to shine, allowing him to achieve a sense of realism often lost in this medium. His production technique is equal parts painting and sculpture. Works are composed of one or more layers of glass pieces that are cut and refined to create a precise fit and then bonded together to a background piece of glass. Tim also makes picture frames and furniture to house each piece. While studying for degrees in science, Tim was also able to learn studio painting techniques in college. He is a self-taught woodworker and furniture builder and was introduced to classical stained glass techniques by a friend. His unique methods of glass work evolved over time as he increasingly sought to improve the representational qualities of stained glass. His love of the natural world led him to wildlife art. His love for the workshop led him to design and create furniture and picture frames.

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David Weintraub

Passionate about glassmaking, Caterina Urrata and David Weintraub of Fiamma Art Glass create a wide variety of work that range from sculptural to functional. From linear threadlike patterns to dynamic colors and forms, each one their pieces capture the fluidity of molten glass, preserving the fleeting moment. Initially working as professional flameworkers, a technique that involved the manipulation of glass through the use of a torch, the pair branched out into glass blowing, casting and other traditional processes. This is reflected in work that is often technically complex while still aiming for simplicity and elegance in design.

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Priscilla Wentworth

Using polymer clay to produce unique, original Millefiori designs, Priscilla Wentworth of Millefiori PatchWork Clay creates beads, jewelry and other accessories. Building each polymer clay design from the middle out as a cane with the design running throughout it, Priscilla uses the Millefiori process that originated from glassmaking and means "thousand flowers" in Italian. A thin slice from the cane can become a component or veneer for a variety of objects and jewelry. With a lifelong urge to create, Priscilla explored a multitude of media, only to recently conclude that she is, “a compulsive problem solver. It's not a bad compulsion to have, especially since I discovered polymer clay in 1993 — those colorful little packages contain just the quirks and challenges I seek.” When not creating, she is often thinking of new ideas or solutions to try. With a BS in visual art from the University of Southern Maine, Priscilla worked as an elementary schools art teacher and was involved with 3 different craft co-ops. Finding plenty of inspiration from the Maine coast she calls home, Priscilla’s work can be found in galleries and shows throughout Maine and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Paulette Werger

Paulette creates jewelry, flatware and vessels that draw on botanical imagery, folk tales and mythology. Her neckpieces, earrings and bracelets combine a variety of materials including fresh water pearls, precious and semi-precious stones, high karat gold, sterling silver and pewter. A master metalsmith, Paulette combines the Keum Boo technique of fusing 24K gold and silver with roller embossing, stamping, etching, solder inlay and stone setting to produce intentionally subtle and elegant pieces of jewelry and table ware. Paulette exhibits and sells her work both nationally and internationally through museums and galleries. Paulette is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Whisper Hill Bath & Body

Randy and Jennie Cysyk of Whisper Hill Bath & Body create lotions, bath salts and soaps that are not only soothing for your skin, but create memorable experiences for your senses. Located in the charming village of Bridgewater, VT, the duo at Whisper Hill creates their bath and body products using natural ingredients including: olive oil, goat's milk, aloe vera, castor oil, shea butter and other nourishing components. Striving to produce products as free from synthetic ingredients as possible, all their soaps, bath salts and body scrubs are made with no chemical preservatives and most of their products are scented with natural essential oils. In addition to creating products more gentle and nourishing for the skin and body, Whisper Hill packages all their products in an eco-friendly way that is, “impacting the earth as minimally as possible, without sacrificing quality. In short we are committed to helping make the world a better place to live. Here's to your health, wellbeing and comfort!”

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Sam Wild

Sam Wild works in porcelain with ball clay added, which is easier to use than straight porcelain. All of his pots are thrown on the potter's wheel and decorated with impressed and applied texture and motifs while the pots are still on the wheel. Because most stamps and molds can't be applied to a freshly thrown pot due to the fact that they would stick, Sam dries the pots somewhat with a torch as soon as they are thrown, prior to beginning to decorate them. The frog, beetle, and gecko designs are made from molds created by Sam. He adds these creatures to his work by placing the mold on the pot and pressing extra clay into the underside or inside of the pot, then pressing the surface of the pot into the mold. Sam graduated from Sandusky High School, Sandusky, Ohio, in 1960. He then spent 3 years in the U.S. Navy, traveling to Japan, Australia, Thailand and other Pacific destinations. After his discharge from the Navy, he earned his Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Fine Arts from Ohio University. In 1971, he established a home and studio in Potter Place, a village of Andover, New Hampshire, and lived there for 31 years, moving to Wilmot, New Hampshire in 2002.

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Wild Ivy Designs

Suzan Scribner-Reed of Wild Ivy Designs creates collaged paper jewelry and precious note cards. Her jewelry, comprised of found recycled papers she embellishes with paint, antique beads, semiprecious stones, hand turned findings, and gold filled and sterling silver wire features her original images. Inspired by nature, her beautifully collaged bird designs are also featured on her note cards. Having worked as a jewelry designer since 1994, Suzan has been working with paper since 1991. A member of the Maine Crafts Guild, Suzan’s work can be found in galleries and art shows throughout the east coast.

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Andrea Williams

Inspired by geometric forms and the use of shadows to create depth and texture, Andrea Williams of Crystal River Weaving designs stunning textiles with dynamic patterns. Enthralled with both the art and science behind the weaving process, Andrea literally paints with fiber to transform an ordinary material into a versatile object of incredible strength, beauty and meaning. Using traditional weaving techniques combined with specialty designer yarns, metallic Lurex and high quality commercial fabric, she carefully laces these materials together using a loom. The final result is as miraculous as it is calculated, a work of art that blends fiber, color, technique and structure. From her table runners and matted textiles to her artisan notecards and gift tags, each piece is unique. A native of Chicago, Andrea had a wide and varied work experience, ranging from being a first-grade teacher to a psychologist, systems analyst and published author. In 1996, she pursued her interest in weaving, attending the Springwater Fiber Studio in Alexandria, VA. In addition to advanced educational degrees from the University of Chicago and University of Maryland, Andrea later earned a degree from the Professional Crafts Program at Haywood Community College in Clyde, NC. Her work has won many awards, including People’s Choice at the NH Weavers Guild 75th Anniversary Show.

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Woodfield Press

Reminiscent of Beatrix Potter and Tasha Tudor, Cindy Hendrick of Woodfield Press creates whimsically illustrated cards featuring animals and delightful captions. Growing up in the hills of western Connecticut in a pre-revolutionary farmhouse, Cindy was surrounded by hundreds of acres of woods and fields to explore and observe the many animals that lived there. In addition to observing the many wounded animals that found themselves coming in and out of her home, Cindy also studied family pets for her childhood drawings. Brought up in a creative environment, both of Cindy’s parents were painters, with her father also working as a cartoonist. His series, “The Mountain Boys" appeared in various magazines and syndicated newspapers from the 1930s through the 1960s. Cindy employs the same techniques her cartoonist father did while working on a strip. Creating her illustrations on an old wooden drawing table with a metal base and an attached swivel shelf, Cindy spreads out her watercolors on a big butcher’s tray. Having studied art at UNH, the Manchester Institute for the Arts and privately with many accomplished painters and artists, Cindy’s wonderful cards can be found at shops across the country.

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Larry Young
Kathleen Krzewinski and Larry Young’s work in Realism stems from a desire to be both environmentalists as well as conscious artists by celebrating the beauty and grace of all living creatures. The garden sculptures are hand cut from steel with an oxygen-acetylene torch. They are ground and polished to perfection in distinct patterns to illuminate the piece depending on the angle of the light as it strikes. Each sculpture is welded together and then painted. The stems are coated in a chemical/chip resistant finish and then overlaid with color. The wings are painted with an automotive paint gun in a layering process originally created by the Flemish/Dutch Masters. Rembrandt used this method in his paintings which entails layering one color over another until the desired color has been reached. A “magic quality” is added to the bottom base coat of clear followed by 2-3 more coats of clear to bring out the desired glass look.

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Marilyn Young

Marilyn Young is a skillful and talented calligrapher and lettering artist that creates beautiful calligraphic art, often with delicate imagery. Using watercolors, decorative papers and various colored inks, Marilyn’s artwork features graceful scenes and meaningful messages. With a variety of quotes, from one’s love of books, to an appreciation for nature, Marilyn’s work represents a number of themes. Living and working out of her Stratham, NH home, Marilyn’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Erica Zap

Creating a vast array of jewelry out of various materials including 18k gold and sterling silver, semi-precious and precious stones as well as leather, Erica Zap has been surrounded by arts and crafts all her life. Her parents owned an international fine crafts gallery that sold crafts and art collected from their extensive travels around the world. Erica's early exposure to this exotic art and culture has greatly influenced her designs. After graduating from S.U.N.Y. New Paltz with a BFA in gold and silversmithing, Erica began designing her own line of jewelry with a goal to "design a contemporary look which exposes beauty through the simplicity of form. My jewelry reflects the integration of past and present cultures. I use metals, stones, textures, shapes and color to create precious pieces that are as individual as the women who wear them." Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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Nina Zotcavage

Nina Zotcavage creates contemporary jewelry in sterling silver and high karat gold. She strives to bring movement, dimension and sensuality into her work. Believing jewelry should reflect and enhance the body, Nina strives to create designs that look and feel good to wear. She begins each piece with a flat piece of silver that she forms by sawing, hammering and soldering. Links and hinges join the components of each piece to give it a lively, fluid ease. A native of New Hampshire, Nina studied at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston and became a textile print designer in New York and LA. There she fell in love with silversmithing and has been making jewelry and teaching for over ten years. She returned to New Hampshire in 2005, becoming a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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Jewelry/Metal

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Lynn Adams

Fascinated with the movement associated with metal, Lynn prefers forging and chasing to piercing and engraving. Much of her jewelry features Enamel, an opaque or semitransparent glassy substance applied to metallic or other hard surfaces for decoration or as a protective coating. She was drawn to Enamel “as it is alive and takes experience to keep more or less under control.” Leaving behind a business career of 25 years to embark upon her jewelry career, Lynn enrolled at the Sir John Cass Department of Art, one of the renowned art and craft institutions in the UK. Her training consisted of a formal introduction to the traditional aspects of metalsmithing and jewelry making as well as some of the design work associated with an art college degree. Lynn left London to move to Lyme, New Hampshire. “Although I loved the city, most of my design is inspired by nature. I am attracted by the multitude of layers, color, light and texture found in the wooded countryside here in New England. I feel most satisfied when I can suggest their richness and complexity in my work.” A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Lynn’s work can be found at galleries across the state, Vermont and Massachusetts.

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Rebecca Alden

Rebecca Alden’s stunning jewelry is inspired by the beauty and diversity of her natural surroundings. Using precious metals and colorful gemstones in glorious combinations, Rebecca skillfully handcrafts her one-of-a-kind and limited edition pieces through fabrication, the process of assembling and manipulating metal sheet and wire into diverse shapes through forging, sawing, bending, filing, and soldering. Her unique designs are often influenced by the shapes and textures of her rare or unusual gemstones from places across the globe; stones like boulder opal doublets, titanium-enhanced drusy quartz, freshwater and cultured pearls, and Russian pyrite. Rebecca worked as a bench and custom jeweler for several years until she “made the leap” and established her own business in 1997. Rebecca is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Kathy Beeson

Kathy Beeson is a New Hampshire lampwork glass artist whose inspiration comes from colorful rods of glass that are heated in a torch until molten. While liquid, they are formed into a bead, then embellished to create various designs. From her studio, Kathy creates many one-of-a-kind lampwork glass beads using an acetyline torch and colorful glass rods. She then strings each colorful bead together forming gorgeous necklaces, earrings and bracelets. Capitalizing on a wide range of vibrant glass, she enjoys the interplay between shape and color. Kathy often incorporates other elements into her jewelry pieces such as peyote stitch. Every one of her unique designs are wearable works of art.

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Kathy Binns

Kathy Binns is a metalsmith based in Candia, NH. Educated in metalsmithing and jewelry at Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston, she has been an instructor at the New Hampshire Institute of Art since 2006. Kathy started her career working for fine jewelers Shreve, Crump and Low and later at jewelry casting houses in Boston and Providence. In the 1980's she became a partner in a fine jewelry casting company, Candia Enterprizes, which ran successfully for 13 years. It was then that she began her business designing and manufacturing museum reproduction jewelry for the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Smithsonian, the Museum of Science Boston and others. Her work has been sold across the country and Japan, and she has also exhibited at professional craft shows including the Rosen Shows American Craft Council Shows and the League of New Hampshire’s annual Craft Fair in Sunapee. In addition to her adjunct faculty position in jewelry and metals at New Hampshire Institute of Art, she also teaches classes at Exeter Fine Crafts and the Maine College of Art.

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Mary Beth Bliss

Passionate about glassmaking, Mary Beth Bliss and Peter VanderLaan create a variety of work that ranges from functional to sculptural. Each of their creations, whether it is Mary Beth’s jewelry or Peter’s blown works, convey an appreciation of technique, complexity of color, and a keen eye for the aesthetic. The couple’s earliest work combined Peter’s magnificent blown forms with Mary Beth’s intricately etched glass layers and stunning glass earrings. A vast spectrum of technical and design possibilities were further explored by the duo for both individual and joint work. Mary Beth and Peter began working together over 30 years ago when they designed and built a glass studio and shop in La Cienega, New Mexico. Guadalupe Glass was founded in 1993 where they built a reputation creating incredible works of glass. The couple was drawn to New Hampshire where Mary Beth spent her teenage years farming trees with her parents. Mary Beth and Peter are members of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Claudia Chase

Claudia Chase creates one-of-a-kind tapestries, baskets, purses and beaded jewelry — all in gorgeous color combinations! “My relationship to color is the common thread that carries from piece to piece, from wools to beads to silk thread and back again to the dye pot, where most of my tapestries’ colors begin.” Claudia studies color in nature, believing that “color theory is the grammar of the visual world.” Claudia approaches her jewelry making from the perspective of a tapestry weaver, in terms of color and technique. She loves the “visual quality of intersecting beads and fiber. “ Claudia uses three painstaking techniques that allow her to intertwine as much as possible: bead weaving on a loom, off-loom “weaving” and crochet. Each of her ribbon like woven necklaces and bracelets, as well as her coil like crocheted pieces, are ravishingly beautiful with unique color palettes made from various glass beads, Austrian crystals and semi-precious stones. Claudia has been working in the fiber and bead arts since 1989. She is the owner of “Mirrix Tapestry Studio Looms,” the leading manufacturer of portable metal tapestry and bead weaving equipment. She has taught various fiber and bead classes and has been a featured writer fir magazines such as “Fiberarts” and “Beadwork.” An award winning weaver, Claudia’s 1994 tapestry ornament was accepted for the White House collection. Her artwork has been featured in several group and solo exhibits and is available in select galleries.

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Tatyana Cherepova

Tatyana Cherepova calls her business Crealm, which stands for Creative Realm. Tatyana makes jewelry for people who want to look and feel different and express their individualities through wearable pieces of art. Tatyana follows the motto "Always Different!" when creating her one-of-a-kind designs. Working primarily in gold, sterling and combinations of these metals, semiprecious stones, pearls, coral or amber are incorporated into each piece. As an avid international traveler, Tatyana is inspired by the diverse cultures around the world. A portfolio of almost 2,000 original designs is a result of innate creativity, acquired trade skills and hard work. A juried member of the Leaguw of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Tatyana's work can be found in galleries across the state.

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Ron Cravens

Ron has become well known for his extensive jewelry selection of interesting designs incorporating clean classical lines with sturdy construction. He works sterling silver and 14k gold into beautiful designs using jewelry saws, pliers, and forging hammers and insists on hand finishing all his pieces from the heaviest to the most intricate. Ron’s collection includes pieces with pearls as well as a wide variety of glorious stones such as turquoise, amethyst, garnet, lapis, onyx, amber and peridot. He enjoys creating jewelry with wide appeal that will be well worn for many years. In 1971, Ron settled in central New Hampshire with his wife, Rose, in a quiet country location where he raised a family, developed his jewelry business and continues to design and create with enthusiasm. Ron Cravens is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Jill D'Angelo

Crafting intricate beaded jewelry in precious metals like gold and silver, Jill D’Angelo began to pursue the craft professional when her mother, a painter, proudly showed off one of her bracelets to a shop owner in Portsmouth. Made from Japanese delica beads, or seed beads, Jill individually slides each piece in place without the use of a chart or graph. Meticulous work, Jill creates intricate, Native American inspired patterns on her bracelets, necklaces and other pieces. Her work is not only a beauty to behold, but felt and worn as the pieces are lightweight and fun to touch. Holding a master's degree in journalism, Jill was brought up in a creative family. Her mother’s oil paintings were shown in galleries throughout New Hampshire and Maine, while her father, an ear, nose, and throat surgeon, was a long-term art appreciator. After showcasing her work at her family’s gallery in downtown Portsmouth, Jill’s work can now be found in galleries throughout Maine and New Hampshire.

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Ann Dillon

Design, color and texture have always been major components of Ann Dillon’s life. For many years, Ann was a weaver creating mostly one-of-a-kind wearables. Now Ann works with polymer clay – a fascinating material that when made into beads and jewelry gives an end result as varied as the person who wears it. Strings of beads, earrings, pins and pendants are beautifully created by Ann. Each piece is unique. Ann is the Art Director of Cobblestone Publishing where she designs two magazines and oversees design and production of five children’s magazines. She is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, New Hampshire Polymer Clay Guild, National Polymer Clay Guild and Bead Society of New Hampshire. Ann majored in Fine Arts at UNH.

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Jack Dokus

Jack creates a wide range of sterling silver and gold jewelry or “body adornment” from simple elegant designs to intricate one-of-a-kind pieces. Fine detail, technical quality and imagination are the hallmarks of his work. Through his training, experience, and unique inner consciousness, Jack reshapes metal into an expression of beauty that can be fanciful, dramatic or have a hidden meaning. Jack also creates small sculptures which are art on the scale of jewelry. In 1976 Jack and his family moved to New Hampshire and according to Jack, “it was the greatest move of my life.” Jack has received Bachelor and graduate degrees in Fine Art and metal work. He is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Dierdre Donchian

Deirdre Donchian of Moon Angel/Primitive Designs creates one-of-a-kind jewelry and ornaments. With her ornament line, Moon Angel Designs, her “Gold” ornaments are etched out of polished brass, while her “Silver” ornaments are etched out of polished brass and then heavily plated with Rhodium. Rhodium, a member of the platinum metal family, is a durable, non-tarnishing silver finish that is virtually indestructible. Dierdre then lacquers each ornament to repel tarnish. Her jewelry line, Primitive Designs, features jewelry hand made at the bench, with materials that include fine silver, 14k to 18k gold and semi precious stones. All findings such as chains and ear wires are sterling silver. Having grown up in New York City, Dierdre graduated from Rhode Island School of Design and proceeded to conceive, manage, and run two gift shops in the seacoast area of Maine and New Hampshire. A member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Dierdre’s work has been shown in galleries and trade shows throughout the country.

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Dierdre Donnelly

Creating uniquely symbolic jewelry with a contemporary flair, Deirdre makes earrings, pendants, rings and cuff bracelets using silver, high karat gold and quality gemstones. Inspired by her Celtic roots, Deirdre’s designs reflect a deep reverence for the decorative imagery of Ireland’s Bronze Age. Using a variety of techniques including forging, forming, stamping, lamination and granulation, Deirdre also makes her own sheet and wire in gold. Preferring translucent stones to opaque ones, Deirdre uses a variety of gemstones that have a rich history and mythology associated with them. Originally from Ireland, Deirdre was inspired to learn metalsmithing from the "îr" (meaning "gold" in the Irish language) Exhibition at the National Museum of Ireland. Having studied at the Jewelry Arts Institute in New York, Deirdre continued to hone her skills as a jeweler by taking advanced classes and workshops with several International artists. Now settled in the picturesque state of Vermont, Deirdre continues to make elegant jewelry with a modern appeal. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Deirdre’s jewelry can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Deb Fairchild

Creating exquisite jewelry, clothing and decorative items out of seed (or small) beads, Deb Fairchild is well versed in off-loom and loom weaving techniques as well as related media such as chain maille and polymer clay. Although Deb works with many off-loom bead-weaving techniques, she especially enjoys the lacy, supple fabrics created from the freeform expression of right-angle weave, bead netting and brick stitch. The freeform platform also allows Deb to experiment with color and adaptations of technique that have become the hallmark of her work. Having been beadweaving since 2003, every piece Deb creates is a one-of-a-kind study in color, rhythm, movement and form. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, her work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Erin Finney

Erin Finney of Erin Finney Glass Designs creates unique kiln fired glass jewelry and mosaics. Having grown up in West Virginia, after college Erin spent time absorbing the artistic influences in San Francisco before settling in Northern New Hampshire. Starting her business in 1990, Erin an elementary school teacher and artist, creates her work along side her dog Luke in the mountaintop studio that she and her husband built. The vibrant periwinkle and yellow studio is surrounded by nature and is both the perfect place for Erin to create her beautiful art and a testament to her passion for color and life. Erin's initial jewelry designs were based on the traditional stained glass copper foil method commonly known as "flat glass." The vision to design earrings using combinations of layered glass with individual movement was the impetus for exploring alternative processes, such kiln firing, commonly known as "hot glass." Erin has participated in numerous glass and jewelry making workshops taught by master craftspeople. Having always been enamored with mosaics, in 2013 Erin was awarded a scholarship by the League of New Hampshire Craftsman to participate in a mosaic mural workshop with Isaiah Zagar of Philadelphia's Magic Garden. Erin now creates individual thematic mosaics as well as mosaic murals working collaboratively with individuals to create custom pieces of special places, pets, people and things. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsman, Erin’s work can be found at many galleries throughout the country.

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Patricia Flynn

Patricia Flynn of Nature’s Fine Jewelry has created jewelry and fine art in a variety of media. Her fascination with birch bark arose from her wanderings through Maine woods. Inspired by their delicate beauty she began incorporating small, choice pieces of birch bark into her work. Patricia combines the birch bark with precious metals, freshwater pearls and glass beads. The birch is made strong and durable, with specially selected lacquers and resins that will not chip or discolor, providing lasting beauty and wear. The bark is harvested from fallen trees, selected for their special markings, making each piece of jewelry unique and a one-of-a-kind.

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Betsy Frost

Betsy Frost creates jewelry that reflects her love of dance and movement. Working primarily in sterling silver, and her pieces are either fabricated from sheet into hollow forms, or cast through the lost-wax casting process. Attracted to sensual shapes and objects, Betsy tries to reflect this magnetism in her work. Striving for fluidity in my pieces, Betsy is constantly trying to 'reinvent a shape' by giving it movement with links or hinges. In Betsy’s work, shape and movement take precedence over surface texture and color. Inspired by artists such as Matisse and Degas, Betsy also get ideas from her immediate surroundings - the shape of a flower, or the 'line' of a piece of furniture or other object. She is mesmerized by patterns in tapestry, wallpaper and carpet. She say’s, “When I'm talking to someone, I must confess, I'm usually studying the wallpaper or designs in the carpet, trying to envision the shapes as beautiful pieces of jewelry." Having grown up in North Bennington, Vermont, the eldest daughter of 10 children, Betsy always thought she would be a doctor, as her father had been taking her along on his surgical rounds from the time she was six. But after a discouraging glimpse of the pre-med rigors at Williams College, Betsy majored in psychology instead. After graduation from Williams in 1987, Betsy pursued a variety of interests. She waited tables in St. Thomas, danced her way around the world with "Up With People," and studied silversmithing in Sweden and at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY. She later moved to Boston, enrolling herself in a master's program in counseling psychology. While in graduate school, Betsy did marketing and sales for a computer company and continued taking classes in silversmithing. It didn't take long for her to discover that she really wanted to design jewelry, so she quit the master's program and began studying at the Massachusetts College of Art, where she later graduated with a BA in Metals. Using tools she inherited from the late Joan Grant, a silversmith and former riding friend, Betsy crafted her first collection. She was quickly accepted into juried wholesale and retail shows. Her work can be found in galleries throughout the northeast.

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Lucy Golden

Lucy Golden has been making jewelry for over 20 years in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Her home and studio are nestled on a 350 acre farm overlooking Franconia Notch. Lucy started making jewelry in high school and then took jewelry courses at RISD while earning a BA from Brown University. She loves color and often incorporates it in non-traditional ways into her brass and silver jewelry. She plays with themes that are important to her; local and exotic flora and fauna, activities in the great outdoors, and the lighter side of life. After a summer of “peak-bagging” (keeping track of climbing New Hampshire mountains that are at least 4,000 feet), Lucy created jewelry with themes that honor the mountains that she adores. Lucy is a juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Lia Gormley

Using traditional goldsmith techniques, Lia creates exquisite jewelry primarily from 18k gold, sterling silver and precious gemstones. Inspired by nature and ancient design elements, Lia combines form, line and texture to create heirloom quality work with a contemporary appeal. Rather than relying on thumbnails, Lia literally draws with the metal itself, manipulating the shape and proportion to create unique works of art. Working directly with the metal allows Lia's designs to evolve naturally- no two pieces are alike. Initially interested in pursuing an illustration degree, Lia's passion for jewelry making emerged while a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. After graduating with a BFA in Jewelry and Light Metals, Lia worked as a goldsmith for a designer in Manhattan, perfecting her craftsmanship and attention to detail. Intrigued by precious gemstones, Lia earned the title of Graduate Gemologist from the Gemological Institute of America. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Lia's work can be found in galleries across the state.

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Anne Hanson

Anne Hanson is a metalsmith and jewelry designer who works in sterling silver, 14k gold, and Bimetal (18k on silver). She handcrafts jewelry using traditional methods of forging, roller printing, and soldering. Anne received a B.A. in Art Education from Cornell College in Iowa. Anne spent many years, with her husband, operating a 200+ acre dairy farm in Wisconsin. After moving to New England, Anne rekindled her passion for jewelry making. In the summer of 2004, Anne suffered a stroke which impaired her speech and all dominant side motor skills. The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission’s Assistive Technology Center helped to modify her studio space, creating methods and tools that make it possible for her to work once again. Anne is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Christiane Hilbrig-Tauroney

Creating original contemporary designs, Christiane makes custom fabricated jewelry using 18k yellow and white gold, sterling silver and an array of natural pearls and stones. Using a wide variety of techniques including soldering, embossing and forging, Christiane designs her unique jewelry right in her home. In addition to these methods, Christiane also works with a mouth-blown torch, fusing layers of sterling silver and gold to create innovative geometric designs. This process allows Christiane to have a personal connection with her work as she literally breathes life into it. Christiane studied at the Kunsthandwerk Schule in Munich, Germany and apprenticed at the studio “Eidel” under the influence of artists Askan and Petra Hertwig. Varied travels landed her in Maine, where she further honed her innovative style under the tutelage of Etienne Perret and other renowned designers. Her original contemporary designs resonate in each artistic creation via a variety of mediums: 18K royal yellow gold, 18K palladium white gold, 14K gold and sterling silver along with an array of natural high quality pearls and stones. Each piece is hand fabricated and formed out of sheet, wire or tubing. Christiane is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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John Holz

Influenced by art deco and mid-century modern designs, John Holz creates elegant jewelry executed in precious metals and semi-precious stones. His designs are often inspired by nature or geometry, but as the artist himself puts it, “refined with mathematics and engineering, which results in thinking about how to execute the design as part of the design process itself.” With a degree in Chemistry and over 40 years experience in computer systems design & manufacturing and technology consulting, John’s life-long hobby transformed into a full-time career. Although he does have some formal training in metalsmithing (Bucks Rock Work Camp, Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts, DeCordova Museum and Metalwerx), John is mostly self-taught. John approaches his jewelry design with the engineering approach of “try something and then refine it.” His work can be found in fine crafts galleries throughout Massachusetts and at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Nathan Jaworski

Nathan Jaworski creates beautiful wire wrapped jewelry featured beach glass and sterling silver wire. Nathan’s designs in his wire jewelry are as unique as the very glass shards themselves. Naturally produced, sea glass originates as pieces of glass from broken bottles, broken tableware or even shipwrecks, which are rolled and tumbled in the ocean for years until all of their edges are rounded off and the slickness of the glass has been worn to a frosted appearance. With each piece of glass having varying contours and shapes, Nathan’s designs are constantly evolving and no two pieces are alike. A native of New Hampshire, Nathan’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Kristin Kennedy

Kristin Kennedy began her jewelry career in 1994 in Arizona after earning a BFA degree. She apprenticed with renowned jeweler Jerry West. Kristin’s necklaces, rings, bracelets and earrings are all one-of-a-kind, incorporating the process of hand-fabrication and heat controlled reticulation. The resulting organic shapes become the basic forms for dazzling stones such as amethyst, blue topaz, iolite, peridot and opals, which are individually selected for each piece. Kristin uses the time-consuming process of hand-weaving fine silver chains to enhance her work. She is also known for her use of rare hand-picked Japanese freshwater pearls and naturally occurring Chinese Keshi pearls. Kristin is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Barbara King

Barbara King fell in love with silver when she took her first jewelry class through the Education Department at Exeter Fine Crafts. She creates original contemporary jewelry from sterling and fine silver and incorporates metals like copper and 24k keumboo along with well-chosen beads, pearls, turquoise, moonstones, carnelians and semi-precious and precious stones. Her signature hand-woven silver chains are featured in stunning necklaces, bracelets, and earrings. Time consuming weaving techniques are used to create intricate chains. Original and one-of-a-kind, each piece of jewelry is a unique creation from a talented and accomplished jeweler.

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Kathleen Krzewinski

Kathleen Krzewinski and Larry Young’s work in Realism stems from a desire to be both environmentalists as well as conscious artists by celebrating the beauty and grace of all living creatures. The garden sculptures are hand cut from steel with an oxygen-acetylene torch. They are ground and polished to perfection in distinct patterns to illuminate the piece depending on the angle of the light as it strikes. Each sculpture is welded together and then painted. The stems are coated in a chemical/chip resistant finish and then overlaid with color. The wings are painted with an automotive paint gun in a layering process originally created by the Flemish/Dutch Masters. Rembrandt used this method in his paintings which entails layering one color over another until the desired color has been reached. A “magic quality” is added to the bottom base coat of clear followed by 2-3 more coats of clear to bring out the desired glass look.

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William & Lynn Kuegel

All types of metal appeal to farrier craftsmen William “Bill” and Lynn Kuegel of Equicraft. Their business name, “Equicraft,” reflects the Kuegel’s love of both horses and art. As Bill put it, “I think of myself not as a horseshoer who makes jewelry, but as an artist who shoes horses.” Bill used horseshoe nails for years as a farrier, but in 1977 he and his wife Lynn began designing horseshoe nail snowflake ornaments, which led to jewelry and small sculpture. Equine, nature and fantasy themes predominate. In recent years their work includes many non-horseshoe nail inspired designs using a wide variety of metals. Bill’s designs are open — in a style of line drawings — with small solid elements. Some of the sterling silver pins are created using complete nails, while others, such as Trotting Horse Pin, are crafted with only the tapered shank of the nail for a delicate flowing appearance. The detailed elegance that characterizes the outline work in Bill’s jewelry can also be found in his nativity scenes, miniature sculptures, wall sculptures and life-sized garden sculptures. Partnership is fundamental to Equicraft. Their logo represents the collaboration of horse and farrier. As business and life partners, Bill and Lynn collaborate on designs. Bill then crafts the pieces while Lynn skillfully manages the business. Equicraft’s ornaments have been featured in Yankee Magazine’s Small Business and Crafts section. “Sterling the Snowman,” who inspired an entire family of snow people, was selected as the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen Ornament in 2000. Their work is available in select fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Thomas Kuhner

Thomas Kuhner started working in precious metals in 1974 as an apprentice to a jeweler. He is an artist who draws much of his inspiration from his love of water, nature, and a cool, clear day, creating pieces that represent all that is organic in the world around us from the delicate petals of a summer garden to the ephemeral beauty of an individual snowflake. Each piece is carefully hand-wrought in precious metals by using traditional centuries-old methods of the metalsmithing trade. The metals are forged, chased or peened, then polished to a high shine. Many are embellished with luminous precious and semi-precious stones and lustrous fresh water pearls. Thomas is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Blair LaBella

Relying on the natural environment for both materials and inspiration, Blair creates stunning one-of-a-kind beach stone jewelry. From her earrings and pendants to her rings and bracelets, each piece is not only impeccably made, but exudes a simple and timeless elegance. Blair’s beautiful beach stone jewelry evolved from years of collecting beach rocks, glass and pottery shards from various coastlines throughout New England. Striving to create jewelry that is not only well made, but comfortable to wear, Blair excels at creating a bezel for each distinct rock, piece of glass or shard. Blair signs each sterling silver bezel with her name and, whenever possible, the location of the found object. After attending the University of Vermont and earning her BFA in ceramics from the Rhode Island School of Design, Blair became increasing drawn to working on smaller-scale designs. Having studied metalsmithing at the DeCordova Museum School, Blair dabbled in many styles of jewelry making including Ceramic Cabochons and Keum-boo before creating her beach stone line. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and a Juror in the Metals category with the League, Blair's work can be found in galleries and shows throughout the country.

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Damien and Jenn Liddiard

Making wooden jewelry using both laser technology and traditional craft techniques, Damien and Jenn Liddiard of Joyo enjoy taking a natural material like wood and transforming it into unique wearable works of art. With a keen interest in preserving the environment, the husband and wife duo met while building a house for a solar design competition in 2008. Constantly inspiring and motivating each other, the pair have combined Jenn’s graphic design background and Damian’s architect background to create modern, yet fun jewelry. With a habit of looking for patterns in our everyday surroundings, Jenn creates jewelry designs she hopes will draw the viewer in. Laser cutting each piece herself, Jen then sands the wood and applies an oil finish before assembling the final jewelry elements. Their newer work is also often hand painted. From the Boston area, you can also find Jenn and Damien’s work at craft shows throughout Massachusetts and Maine.

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Walter Liff

Working in steel, aluminum or copper, Walter Liff of Steeling Nature creates one-of-a-kind metal sculptures inspired by his love of nature. An avid naturalist, Walter’s work encompasses a range of themes including graceful representations of birds to whimsical depictions of flying pigs. Walter’s interest in metalsmithing began when his son Paul took a welding course in high school. The two developed a strong bond over the craft and when Paul died of multiple sclerosis, Walter continued to make his beautiful sculptures as a tribute to his son. Walter is now recognized as an award winning artist and has been featured in several publications and television appearances. His work can be found in private and corporate collections throughout the United States and Europe.

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Jim and Andrea Lorette

Andrea & Jim Lorette of Jayelay Jewelers work together to create hand-forged jewelry made of genuine solid metals, real gemstones and other natural materials. Their castings are derived from their original carvings, treasures found in nature or objects from ancient times. Andrea and Jim make their own tools and use fold forming and anticlastic techniques in their designs. Collaborating between husband and wife is an ongoing adventure into the creative world. Andrea is always seeking and applying new techniques to her work, while Jim specializes in materials. With earrings, pins and pendants, all crafted by either Andrea, Jim or by the two together, there is always something new and exciting going on their studio. Members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Andrea and Jim’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Nancy Marland

Inspired by the many different aspects of nature, Nancy Marland finds herself particularly drawn to water. Seeking to capture the beauty inherent in its variety of organic shapes and forms, Nancy’s jewelry also reflects an admiration for the element itself. Creating wearable works of art, Nancy hopes each piece resonates with a deep and personal connection to our greatest life source. Working in a variety of metalsmithing techniques, Nancy’s work has evolved overtime. For the past 30 years she has worked as a self-employed graphic designer, serving many industries from technology to arts organizations and publishing. As a college student Nancy majored in painting and sculpture, earning her BFA from the Art Institute of Boston. After years of working on a computer, Nancy yearned to use traditional mediums again. She experimented with clay while still maintaining her graphic design business. This eventually led to an interest in working with silver metal clay and creating craft jewelry. While experimenting with this expressive medium, Nancy discovered a true passion and excitement for creating unique, contemporary jewelry and Nancy Marland Jewelry was born. Currently, she is drawn to metalsmith techniques, working with a tarnish-resistant Argentium sterling silver to which she often adds contrasting patinas and occasionally color with polymer. Living and working on Boston's north shore, Nancy has a deep connection with the ocean. Her work can be found in craft shows throughout Massachusetts and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Daphne McDonald

Creating stunning contemporary jewelry that echoes the graceful curves, shapes and lines found in calligraphy, Daphne’s work reflects her interest in the creative process. From her necklaces and earrings to her bracelets and rings, every piece shows Daphne’s attention to detail and fascination with transforming an idea into a finished work of art. Starting with a flat piece of silver or gold, Daphne relies on her primary tool, a jeweler’s handsaw, to cut shapes into the metal. First she drills tiny holes into the interior of the piece that enable her to carefully saw the lines and open the shapes of her designs. Occasionally the shape or color of a stone will immediately influence Daphne’s work, but often many of her ideas take months to evolve. Having first dabbled in jewelry in the 6th grade when Daphne made a pin out of brass and silver, her fascination with metal smithing continued throughout the years. Although mainly self taught, Daphne has taken many workshops to learn specific techniques including most recently, hand crocheted chains. Crediting much of her creativity to her gifted mother, Daphne continues to make jewelry out of her studio in Rollinsford, NH. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Daphne’s work can be found in galleries and fairs throughout the northeast.

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Karen Mitchell

Karen handcrafts sterling silver jewelry that reflects her joy in the New England Seasons. A former block printmaker, Karen designs her “pierced” silver pieces much the same way she designed block prints, by removing shadows with her tiny saw blade and leaving the light. The eye fills in the details of her contemporary renderings of animals and natural textures. A New England native, Karen first studied studio art at Colby College and the University of Maine at Orono, focusing on printmaking, etching and block prints. Back in New Hampshire several years later, Karen took a jewelry making class at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Karen lives in Mont Vernon and is an active member of the Mont Vernon Artisans.

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Elise Moran

Inspired by nature’s perfect design, Elise Moran of E*A*M* Studios creates stunning pendants and earrings out of solid sterling silver, 14k or 18k gold. Her jewelry not only reflects an appreciation of the natural world, but translates its infinite wonders into wearable works of art. Using traditional metalsmithing techniques, such as casting, Elise finishes each piece with a soft satin patina to emphasize the object’s form and enhance the color of the metal. Her jewelry also features beautifully handmade findings and closures. Graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in jewelry and light metals, Elise’s work can be found in various galleries and museum shops throughout the country.

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Susan Mulvey

Working as a jeweler for over 40 years, Susan strives to achieve beauty and simplicity of form in each one of her handcrafted pieces. From the curvature of the metal, to the placement of a stone, Susan's designs reflect a distinctive elegance and wide appeal. For Susan, the process of creating and watching that creation emerge is magical. Using different metals and stones, Susan constructs her jewelry in a variety of techniques including, forging, embossing, sawing and soldering. Occasionally the shape or color of a stone will influence Susan's designs, but often many of her pieces evolve naturally. Although mainly self taught, Susan's journey as a jeweler began at the Brookfield Craft Center where she learned the basics of metal smithing. Throughout her long career, Susan has returned to Brookfield as an apprentice and demonstrator further honing her skills. Susan has also attended both the Gemological Institute of America and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Susan's work can be found in galleries throughout the northeast.

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Ritvaliisa Ojanen

Subtle color combinations of fresh water pearls, texture of the silver surface, size and shape of beads are the building blocks for Ritvaliisa Ojanen’s designs. Ideas for the jewelry slowly emerge when all the materials are in front of Ritvaliisa on her worktable. New designs spring from past experiments and combined with new solutions lending to one-of-a-kind pieces. Materials include glass beads, fresh water pearls, semi-precious stones and fine silver. Construction methods are a combination of seed bead weaving and stringing techniques. Ritvaliisa makes her own clasps and silver beads from metal clay using molding and hand forming techniques. Ritvaliisa applies a patina to the silver components to coordinate with the colors of the beads and pearls.

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Laurie Olson-Sabol

Laurie Olson-Sabol creates original lampworked glass bead jewelry combining her love of hotglass and her skill at metalsmithing. Her necklaces, bracelets and earrings feature one-of-a-kind round and elongated glass beads layered with vibrant color. Laurie’s design sense tends to be organic. Inspired by her natural surroundings, such as light on water, the color of flowers, clouds or fog, Laurie thinks about how she can create similar effects in glass or metal. Laurie loves color, especially transparent color. Having worked in many different mediums, Laurie feels at home in “Hot Glass” as she enjoys its’ freedom of color and form. Using a torch, she transforms rods of glass into beautiful beads. A self-taught lampworker, Laurie has been making glass jewelry for over ten years. Always interested in art, Laurie began designing and making jewelry in childhood. As a teenager, she bought her first torch and taught herself silversmithing. After graduating from the University of New Hampshire with a major in art, she attended Boston University’s Program in Artistry for advanced metal studies. While at BU, she did sculptural pieces in a variety of materials. Laurie has worked for several fine jewelry stores, including Shreve Crump and Lowe of Boston, doing goldsmithing and design work.

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Julia Parkhurst

Creating stunning one-of-a-kind earrings, pendants, rings and bracelets, Julia Parkhurst has been “Catching the Fancy” of jewelry lovers with her unique, wearable art. Hand crafted in silver, gold as well as beautiful precious and semi-precious stones, Julia’s work reflects her love of nature. As a child, she regularly accompanied her mother, a self-taught naturalist, on hikes to identify the birds, flowers and trees of northern Indiana. Trips to the sands dunes and beaches of nearby Lake Michigan gave way to awe and respect for the abundant animal and plant life there. After her retirement from a career in education as a teacher/administrator, Julia began to pursue a career in jewelry making. Teaching classes here at Exeter Fine Crafts and the New Hampshire Institute of Art, Julia has enjoyed the opportunity to introduce others to the medium. Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout the state.

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John & Susan Pearsall

John and Susan Pearsall of Pearsall and Sons Goldsmiths meticulously handcraft gold and silver jewelry. Their work includes contemporary pieces with clean graceful lines and breathtaking one-of-a-kind pieces that feature precision engraving, gemstones, and pearls. Precious metal is shaped with hand tools, then braised or welded at the joints before being textured or hammered into final shapes. Creating jewelry for over 35 years, Pearsall and Sons Goldsmiths include three generations. John’s late father was part of the business as was his son. Susan is the chief designer of the more figurative pieces – flowers and birds that are sculpted in wax and cast by the lost wax process. John and Susan are longtime members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Evelyn Pelati

Evelyn Pelati is an American artist living in Connecticut. Her designs are the result of her fascination with the Arts and Crafts and Art Deco periods along with her own unique artist vision. Evelyn finds inspiration from architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Charles Rennie Mackintosh; the metalwork of Stickley, Dirk van Erp, Tiffany and more; and the art deco fashion designs of Erté. Atter designing and fabricating her jewelry, Evelyn then hand finishes each and every piece... including soldering, polishing and imparting her signature vintage look. Evelyn is proud to be a Roycroft Renaissance Master Artisan. This honor carries with it the responsibility to create handcrafted work that upholds the legacy of the iconic American arts organization, the Roycrofters. The Roycroft's creed is, "A belief in working with the head, hand, and heart and mixing enough play with the work so that every task is pleasurable and makes for health and happiness." Working in her home studio, Evelyn is proud to be a part of the resurgence of "Made in the U.S.A." pride.

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Lauren Pollaro

Lauren Pollaro has always been intrigued by color and the relationships colors have to one another. Through jewelry, she presents color as it combines with texture, pattern, and shape. These pieces become collages composed of original acrylic paintings on paper, metals, stones, glass and found objects. Each of these elements is manipulated to create numerous designs. The design, usually a shape and a color, becomes the foundation for each piece. Another shape might be added to form another level and then a palette of various materials is gathered to build or assemble a harmonious design. Many pieces have incorporated some type of landscape which gives a feeling of the sea, desert or mountain as land meets sky. Lauren was born in Brooklyn, NY, and has a BA in Fine Arts from UNH. Lauren is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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The Poppy Seed

Bill and Sallie Ellis of The Poppy Seed create copper wind chimes that are a pleasure to see as well as hear. With many themes including: animals, nautical, foliage and more, all the artwork is hand cut and formed. After cutting each piece and stringing the wind chime together, the copper is then treated to seal it, which darkens the metal and protects it from weathering. Having made wind chimes for more than twenty-five years, Sallie also creates natural wax candles out of palm and soy wax. Members of the Society of Southern Maine Craftsmen, their work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout Maine and New Hampshire.

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Julie Schmidt

A largely self-taught metalsmith, Julie fuses sterling silver, copper and brass into elegant, yet whimsical jewelry. Inspired by movement, texture and form, Julie creates unique pins, pendants, earrings and bracelets. Each piece is either hammered, heat treated or stitched together into stunning works of art. The inspiration behind her signature stitching technique came from Julie’s grandparents who were missionaries in Africa. As a child, Julie received several African relics that later influenced her early designs. Although the tribal, primitive feel of Julie’s work has evolved over the years, the organic essence has remained. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Julie’s work can be found in galleries across the country. Julie is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Erica Schlueter

Combining various fabric textures and riveting, Erica Schlueter of Bent Metal creates contemporary sterling silver and 18k bi-metal jewelry that is as unique as it is beautiful. Erica meticulously joins the pieces of her jewelry together using rivets, a technique of firmly securing pieces of metal together, without the use of solder. The rivets themselves become integral elements in her designs. With a background in textile design and a BFA in Fiber, Erica also uses patterns to create visual depth within her work. Similar to block printing on fabric, Erica uses metal stamps and actual fabric textures to emboss her jewelry. The textured pieces are then collaged together using rivets. In some of her work, Erica also uses silk embroidery and crochet to join and embellish the metal. By combining these techniques, Erica creates distinct pieces of jewelry that have a wide appeal.

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Nisa Smiley

Nisa Smiley’s love of the environment and her native coastal Maine is evident in her nature inspired and earth friendly line of jewelry. Her mussel shell necklaces and earrings are created using a painstaking process of filing and polishing the shell to bring out its translucence and then enclosing the shell in resin for durability. Breakage in this process can be frustrating when dealing with something as delicate as a shell and so many shells do not make it to the final part of the process. This consists of setting the strengthened shell in a sterling silver bezel frame. The final product is a wearable testament to the beauty in nature’s own elegant designs.

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Lochlin Smith

Drawing inspiration from his Celtic ancestry, as well as Aztec, Egyptian and Aboriginal Designs, Lochlin Smith creates stunning, contemporary jewelry. From his necklaces, bracelets and earrings to his watches and mobiles, every piece is created in bronze and given a variety of finishes including antique silver and several colored patinas. Twisting, torching, pounding and shaping bronze rods and sheets, Lochlin’s jewelry captures his fascination with nature, echoing the graceful curves and earthy colors of the natural world. Employing both traditional and original methods to create his pieces, Lochlin works from his Vermont studio and is a juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen and The Boston Society of Arts & Crafts.

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Linda Sorenson

Linda Sorensen’s lifelong passion for making things has led to a full-time career of handcrafting gold and silver jewelry. Her artistic medium changed radically during her last semester at the University of New Hampshire when, as a drawing and printmaking major, she enrolled in a beginning jewelry course in order to satisfy 3 remaining credit requirements and a gap in her schedule. That chance encounter led to further jewelry study at the Institute of Arts and Sciences in Manchester, New Hampshire, along with private study and professional workshops and juried membership in the prestigious League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Today Linda works her hammers, anvils and torches on a hilltop in New Hampshire's White Mountains. Her jewelry designs reflect the rich texture and love of color found in her earlier work. Using silver, gold and semi-precious cabochon stones, Sorensen creates earrings, necklaces, pins and bracelets with a balanced proportion and classic simplicity. Linda’s work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Barbara Sperling

Creating contemporary work with intricate detail not often found in polymer clay, Barbara makes stunning pendants and earrings. Millefiori canework is the process of building a log with a picture running through it, essentially, creating a 2-D picture with 3-D rods of clay. Having been asked how she can figure out the detail in her work, Barbara replies that in her mind, she envisions what she needs to do to make that spatial relationship. Similar to a puzzle, Barbara breaks the polymer clay into many small parts, making them lengthwise into a log and then combining them into a wider log. A laborious process, often taken two weeks to complete, Barbara begins each piece with a millefiori cane. To create the cane, Barbara begins by mixing all the colors of the clay she will need, then making individually logs of the designs that will make up the image. Each individual feather of a bird or petal of a flower must be made into a log of clay first. She reduces these pieces in size by stretching or rolling the cane, then tightly packing each piece together to form a larger cane. The finished result can be reduced in size again allowing the many applications and detail that you see in Barbara’s work. After forming the jewelry pieces, they are baked in a convection oven at 265 degrees. Attracted to the beautiful colors, Barbara began working with polymer clay in 1994, after seeing some blue swirled beads. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Barbara's work can be in galleries throughout the state.

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Daryl Storrs

Creating lithographic jewelry, Vermont printmaker, Daryl Storrs, also creates woodcuts and pastel drawings. Creating beautiful pins and earrings, each piece of jewelry is an original lithograph. Drawn to size, the images are hand printed by Daryl herself from a metal plate onto thick cotton paper. She then hand colors each piece with light-fast inks. After applying several layers of varnish, Daryl mounts the miniature print onto anodized aluminum. Having been a printmaker for 35 years, Daryl was first introduced to etching in college. Not only enthralled with the various steps involved in creating a metal plate, the ability to create multiple works of art from a single plate appealed to Daryl’s practical side. After college, she apprenticed with Sabra Field and learned the art of woodcuts. Inspired to return to school after two years of working, Daryl earned a master’s degree in printmaking from UMass Amherst. Returning to Vermont, Daryl waitressed briefly to pay the bills. Initially making paper earrings, she started selling them to customers who saw her wearing them in the restaurant. Her business grew and she was thankfully able to end her waitressing career. During this time, Daryl applied to the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, NH and was awarded a six-week printmaking residency. Moving to Huntington Vermont 23 years ago, Daryl converted an old barn on her property that now serves as her beautiful studio. Daryl’s time is divided between making woodcuts, jewelry and pastels — all of which focus on the Vermont landscape. Her work can be found in galleries throughout Vermont and New Hampshire.

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Terri Talas

Terri Talas’s work offers an extraordinary window into the natural world through one-of-a-kind pendants and sculptures, created in rare fossilized materials, including prehistoric mammoth ivory and naturally shed caribou antler. Known for her exquisite workmanship, Terri’s pendant carvings are created in ancient wooly mammoth ivory that is harvested annually from the permafrost in Northern Alaska, Siberia and the depths of the North Sea. The rich color variations in the fossilized materials reflect mineralization over thousands of years. According to Terri, “ancient fossil materials are mysteries – not one will be the same in color or texture and I never know what an inner layer will unfold.” Primarily a self-taught artist, Terri has been creating a wide variety of naturalistic art for over thirty years. Originally drawn to more traditional mediums, Terri swapped her paint brush for a chisel, carving into granite before moving on to bone materials. While working as the Lead Artist for the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management, Terri won numerous awards for her murals and artwork. Her permanent installations include murals in the lobbies of Heritage Park Museums in Massachusetts and a diorama background at the Concord Art Museum. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Terri’s work was featured recently in the League’s Continuing the Tradition Exhibit and a juried exhibit at the Nebraska Great Plains Museum.

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T. Breeze Verdant

Creating beautiful designs with woods, Paua abalone and fine metals, T. Breeze Verdant’s work echoes the natural landscape with compelling colors and patterns. A self-taught marquetry artist, T. Breeze (the “T” stands for Tom) uses very thin veneers, creating elaborate images and landscapes on boxes, guitars, jewelry and small tabletops. Not one to continue producing the same item over and over again, T. Breeze works in cycles, with his designs constantly evolving. Marquetry is the art of applying pieces of veneer to a surface to form decorative patterns, designs or pictures. This process allows T. Breeze to work with rare woods without using much. "Little material travels through my studio doors," he says. "I like to work with veneers because there's no sawdust, no waste. They're sliced, not sawn. A piece of wood 1” thick produces 40 slices of veneer. I can create the greatest amount of beauty from the least amount of wood." T. Breeze’s aim has always been to create and share the beauty of wood while consuming very little of it. He started his woodworking experience by building a log cabin from his own trees and rocks and even built a second home using only materials from demolished buildings. This sentiment is carried on with T. Breeze’s art today as much of his work is made from scavenged and recycled woods. A jack of many trades, T. Breeze has been a full-time marquetry artist since 1988. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, his work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the country.

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Priscilla Wentworth

Using polymer clay to produce unique, original Millefiori designs, Priscilla Wentworth of Millefiori PatchWork Clay creates beads, jewelry and other accessories. Building each polymer clay design from the middle out as a cane with the design running throughout it, Priscilla uses the Millefiori process that originated from glassmaking and means "thousand flowers" in Italian. A thin slice from the cane can become a component or veneer for a variety of objects and jewelry. With a lifelong urge to create, Priscilla explored a multitude of media, only to recently conclude that she is, “a compulsive problem solver. It's not a bad compulsion to have, especially since I discovered polymer clay in 1993 — those colorful little packages contain just the quirks and challenges I seek.” When not creating, she is often thinking of new ideas or solutions to try. With a BS in visual art from the University of Southern Maine, Priscilla worked as an elementary schools art teacher and was involved with 3 different craft co-ops. Finding plenty of inspiration from the Maine coast she calls home, Priscilla’s work can be found in galleries and shows throughout Maine and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Paulette Werger

Paulette creates jewelry, flatware and vessels that draw on botanical imagery, folk tales and mythology. Her neckpieces, earrings and bracelets combine a variety of materials including fresh water pearls, precious and semi-precious stones, high karat gold, sterling silver and pewter. A master metalsmith, Paulette combines the Keum Boo technique of fusing 24K gold and silver with roller embossing, stamping, etching, solder inlay and stone setting to produce intentionally subtle and elegant pieces of jewelry and table ware. Paulette exhibits and sells her work both nationally and internationally through museums and galleries. Paulette is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Larry Young

Kathleen Krzewinski and Larry Young’s work in Realism stems from a desire to be both environmentalists as well as conscious artists by celebrating the beauty and grace of all living creatures. The garden sculptures are hand cut from steel with an oxygen-acetylene torch. They are ground and polished to perfection in distinct patterns to illuminate the piece depending on the angle of the light as it strikes. Each sculpture is welded together and then painted. The stems are coated in a chemical/chip resistant finish and then overlaid with color. The wings are painted with an automotive paint gun in a layering process originally created by the Flemish/Dutch Masters. Rembrandt used this method in his paintings which entails layering one color over another until the desired color has been reached. A “magic quality” is added to the bottom base coat of clear followed by 2-3 more coats of clear to bring out the desired glass look.

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Erica Zap

Creating a vast array of jewelry out of various materials including 18k gold and sterling silver, semi-precious and precious stones as well as leather, Erica Zap has been surrounded by arts and crafts all her life. Her parents owned an international fine crafts gallery that sold crafts and art collected from their extensive travels around the world. Erica's early exposure to this exotic art and culture has greatly influenced her designs. After graduating from S.U.N.Y. New Paltz with a BFA in gold and silversmithing, Erica began designing her own line of jewelry with a goal to "design a contemporary look which exposes beauty through the simplicity of form. My jewelry reflects the integration of past and present cultures. I use metals, stones, textures, shapes and color to create precious pieces that are as individual as the women who wear them." Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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Nina Zotcavage

Nina Zotcavage creates contemporary jewelry in sterling silver and high karat gold. She strives to bring movement, dimension and sensuality into her work. Believing jewelry should reflect and enhance the body, Nina strives to create designs that look and feel good to wear. She begins each piece with a flat piece of silver that she forms by sawing, hammering and soldering. Links and hinges join the components of each piece to give it a lively, fluid ease. A native of New Hampshire, Nina studied at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston and became a textile print designer in New York and LA. There she fell in love with silversmithing and has been making jewelry and teaching for over ten years. She returned to New Hampshire in 2005, becoming a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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Pottery
Sibel Alpaslan

Inspired by the diverse cultural landscape of her native Turkey, Sibel creates stunning ceramic work that pays homage to her homeland. With a keen eye for color, texture and form, Sibel's work is often a combination of exploration and admiration. Believing it is part of her artistic responsibility to draw from the previous generations and carry that wisdom and spirit into the future, Sibel's work is more than a reflection of cultures past, but an embodiment. Loving the organic nature of the clay itself, Sibel often finds that her subject matters choose her rather than the other way around. This whimsical quality is often reflected in Sibel's work, with its bright colors and beautiful designs. Having earned both her undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Marmara in Instanbul, Sibel opened a ceramics gallery in Kusadasi, Turkey. After ten years, Sibel decided to make America her new home. Having settled in Newburyport, MA, Sibel is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Paula Barry

Paula Barry, of Wallace Hill Pottery, creates work that reflects her life. Her beautiful designs, unconsciously influenced by her love of the natural world, have a fluid style. Graceful, yet organic., Paula is greatly satisfied with capturing patterns in her work. Working in both porcelain and stoneware, Paula strives to create work that is both aesthetically pleasing, yet relaxing to the viewer. She adds, “I hope when you view my work, it makes you smile. I am fortunate to create what I love.” Her studio, located in Townsend, MA, offers a perfect view into nature’s splendor. The meadow that lies beyond is often inhabited by deer and wild turkeys and offer welcome distractions for the artist. A juried member of the Dunstable Artisans, League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and New Hampshire Potters Guild, Paula’s work can be found in galleries throughout New England.

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Patti Bax

Creating whimsical clay jewelry and accessories, Patti Bax of The Cabbage Rose loves the limitless possibilities of working with clay. Her interest in the medium took root in college where she minored in ceramics. Although she enjoyed throwing pottery on the wheel, Patti "wanted to make something (suited) for crafts shows." After some experimentation, she began with pins. Over the years, Patti’s work has expanded to include seasonal ornaments, plaques, earrings and garden markers. Despite the steady core of merchandise that hasn’t gone out of style all these years, The Cabbage Rose keeps evolving. Patti is constantly meeting new people who place custom orders for their sports teams, organizations and fundraisers. Oftentimes, new ideas are generated through these interactions. "I love it so much," Bax said of her art, "for me, it keeps evolving and I keep going with it.” Patti handcrafts each piece individually out of white clay, which then goes through an initial bisque fire to harden the piece for coloring. Patti then paints, glazes and fires the piece again to approximately 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. Slight variations in color, shape and finish add the uniqueness of each finished product. Patti also personally signs each piece. "The sky really is the limit on this," Patti say’s of her art, adding that she aims to "make people smile" and believes there is a piece of whimsy to suit any personality. In addition to her clay work, Patti is involved in interior design consulting, window treatments and decorative mural painting.

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Doug Blum

Working for over three decades as a potter and artist, Doug Blum creates both traditional and contemporary work in a variety of styles. From his graceful swan sculptures, to his beautiful lily lamps, fine art paintings, sculptures and tiled wall hangings, Doug’s work is well known for his innovative glazing methods and his meticulous attention to detail. Inspired by the natural sciences, many of Doug’s beautifully hand sculpted pieces reflect a combination of grace and fluidity. A member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Doug exhibits his work at many of the top juried craft shows nationwide.

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Dottie Bragdon

Dottie Bragdon’s interest in clay began before she was 10 years old. In art class, she poured sloppy clay slip into molds to make cereal bowls. She raced to the basement daily to see if the clay was thick enough. Throughout her childhood, Dottie’s family used those four small green bowls. In 1961, at Governor Dummer Academy, Dottie finally had another opportunity to work with clay. What attracted her most in the early days was the perfectly round and smooth forms. The journey has taken her toward wheel thrown and altered forms and then back to a line of simpler pots for the magic of soda firings. Dottie also makes Black Bear Pots, a technique learned from Sea Shell Flower, a Native American potter from the San Ildefonso Pueblo in Santa Fe. Dottie is a member of the League of NH Craftsmen and the Newburyport Art Association.

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Shana Brautigam

Shana Brautigam is a potter and teacher working at Rooted in Clay pottery studio. She makes her forms using hand-building techniques such as pinching, coiling and slab building. Without using a wheel, Shana makes bowls, mugs, teapots, large vessels and clay instruments. She decorates the surface by imprinting natural objects such as leaves, ferns, evergreens and nutshells into the clay. The pottery is fired outside in a wood-fired kiln which was built from old electric kilns. The kiln is fired with branches gathered from local woods and scraps from nearby mills. firing with wood allows the flames to touch each pot and create a range of beautiful earth tones and surface effects. Soda ash is introduced into the atmosphere. The soda ash vaporizes immediately and adds to the interesting surface effects, creating a subtle sheen on the work. Shana is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Brick Pond Handworks

Mary W. DeCaprio of Brick Pond Handworks creates ceramic ornaments and pins in the original Dedham Pottery style. Created during the American arts & crafts movement, Dedham Pottery became known for its high-fire stoneware characterized by a controlled and very fine crackle glaze with brushed cobalt designs. Continuing this traditional New England style pottery, Mary’s work is also influenced by her own creativity and interests. Inspired by nature, history, personal experience and pure imagination, Mary’s work also reflects her interests in fine art, wildlife, gardening and antiques. A classically trained artist with degrees from Boston University (MFA) and the Kansas City Art Institute (BFA), Mary founded Brick Pond Handworks in 1988. Located in the small town of Pepperell, MA, it is rumored that Brick Pond Handworks is located on what was once farmland adjacent to a brook where clay was mined and transformed into bricks. Mary’s work not only reflects her many interests, but represents the rich cultural heritage of New England pottery.

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Tim Christensen

Working in porcelain, Tim Christensen creates stunning black and white sgraffito pottery. His designs are literally snapshots of the world around him and Tim prides himself on capturing scenes that would otherwise go unnoticed. Whether it’s the crows that follow the potter during his walks in the woods or the fish swimming in the river by his home, Tim’s work is an evolving narrative of the world around him. Working in sgraffito, a method not unlike scratchboard, where the top layer of colored slip is removed to reveal the bare clay beneath, Tim begins each piece as if he were illustrating a dream. This approach allows the artist to capture subject matter his conscious mind might not otherwise be able to express. Generally spending one day a month throwing on his pottery wheel, Tim lets the clay air-dry before sanding, painting and carving each piece with a dry point stylus. Creating work he hopes will resonate with future generations, Tim’s pots don’t just reflect nature, but the time in which we live and the challenges we face as a society divorced from our natural world. Graduating from Colby College with a degree in poetry, Tim occupied himself with many different jobs before stumbling onto pottery. Living off-the-grid near the coast in eastern Maine, Tim is a member of the Maine Crafts Association. He has received many awards for his pottery and sculpture, including those from the Society of Arts and Crafts: CraftBoston, the Thorne-Sagendorf Museum and the National Prize Show at the Cambridge Art Association. Tim’s work has been shown around the country and can also be found in galleries and fine craft shows throughout New England.

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Sally Cornwell

Relying on ancient hand-building techniques, Sally creates a wide range of stunning pottery. From her beautiful vases to her singing marble bowls, Sally’s work echoes the essence of the clay itself, revealing not only her appreciation for the natural world, but her passion for pottery. Sally’s creative process is deeply influenced by nature. A naturalist, Sally captures the rustic spirit of the outdoors through her use of form, color and décor. Working by hand, Sally constructs each piece of her unique pottery by either pinching, combining lines of coils or using rolled out slabs of clay. She then adorns each piece with organic elements. Sally first began experimenting with pottery as a hobby, taking various classes throughout her high school and college years. It wasn’t until her early twenties that Sally began exploring the medium more seriously. Under the tutelage of a potter who had studied ceramics in Osaka, Japan, Sally began refining her techniques, transforming her hobby into a successful career. In addition to pottery, Sally also works with her husband as a chocolatier. Their company, Winnipesaukee Chocolates, produces two lines of chocolate bars, each celebrating different regions in New Hampshire.

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Steve Cunliffe

Steve Cunliffe creates appealing functional pottery from red and white stoneware. His extensive background in furniture making is reflected in the designs of his pots. The forms that he chooses for his pottery are simple and clean with an elegance that resembles the lines of fine furniture. Steve’s mugs, bowls, pitchers, covered jars and casseroles are a pleasure to hold. His quiet colors and simplicity of form evoke a serene feeling. The details of Steve’s minimal designs embellish the work without overwhelming it. A professional woodworker to this day, Steve was a furniture maker for 15 years before he turned to clay five years ago. He likes the immediacy of working with clay, having his hands directly in the clay, rather than having a tool between himself and the wood. Steve’s ceramic work is constantly evolving as he continues to experiment with new techniques. He’s currently working on “new free form bowls” that are asymmetrical. Steve is self-taught, mostly through books and magazines and by visiting other potters. He notes that potters are usually very generous with their time and knowledge, which is something that he wants to continue in his own practice. 0teve is an active member of the New Hampshire Potter’s Guild and a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen in both ceramics and wood. He works from a studio in his home in Henniker.

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Lorraine Dilmore

Lorraine Dilmore works in wheel-thrown stoneware and porcelain and explores the medium with rich warm glazes and textures. She also incorporates her studies of sumi-e, Japanese brushwork, with its subtlety and simplicity, into her work. The designs are applied directly on the wet, freshly-thrown pots as they spin slowly on the wheel, creating a fluid, spontaneous effect. No two pieces are exactly alike, although the “feel” is consistent throughout the line of work. A visit to Lorraine’s studio will find her at the wheel, surrounded by wildflowers, leaves and cut flowers from her many gardens. From these natural sources of inspiration, she experiments and creates shapes and forms in clay to be decorated with a variety of colored clay “slips.” This durable, functional, and attractive pottery is oven-proof and dishwasher and microwave safe. All glazes are lead-free. Lorraine is a Fine Arts graduate of SUNY/ Potsdam. She teaches pottery at Exeter Fine Crafts and is a juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Janet Duchesneau

Janet Duchesneau of East Wind Pottery creates highly refined, wheel-thrown pieces, decorated with colorful Macro-Crystalline glazes. Janet’s work is both functional and visually interesting. Creating pottery is more than a simple mechanical process but a diverse mode of expression. Working in porcelain, Janet’s work displays a distinct crystal growth on the glazed surface of her pottery. Her unique glazes are created from large amounts of silica, zinc oxide, and titanium forming crystals of zinc silicate, or Willemite. Equally critical are the firing and cooling cycles of the glazed pieces. Janet fires her work at 2350 degrees and cools it slowly allowing the crystals to form. No two pieces are alike. Having grown up in Paris, France, Janet was surrounded by the arts and felt a natural inclination towards it. After high school, Janet returned to the states, and in 1979, she opened her first pottery studio. Janet is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Edgecomb Potters

Edgecomb Potters, founded by Chris and Richard Hilton, are known for their innovative glazes. Spending years studying and perfecting glazing techniques, Richard developed hundreds of glazes that have gained critical and national acclaim. Richard, a communications major at Emerson College had planned a career in broadcast, while Chris was an art teacher. The two moved to Maine where they began Edgecomb Potters. Starting out in a one-room schoolhouse on the road to Boothbay Harbor, nearly four decades later, Edgecomb potters is still creating one-of-a-kind porcelain pottery. Their pottery has been showcased in multiple magazines including Ceramics Monthly and Niche Magazine as well as being recognized in the Boston Globe. Reveling in the wondrous pottery colors he created, Richard has said, “I believe that great art pottery encompasses a spirit reflected in life; no two pieces, as no two people, no two living creatures, are exactly alike."

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Liz Fletcher

Liz Fletcher uses stoneware clay to make everything from small bowls to large outdoor sculptures. Her sense of humor and gentle spirit are evident in her delightful work. Liz’s greatest love is making animals and other life forms. Liz is adept at a variety of forming methods, building by hand with clay slabs as well as throwing on the wheel. She loves exploring new ways of creating. Each sculpture is a voyage of exploration. “I’ve never quite grown out of playing – I love clay’s responsiveness to touch, its connection to the earth.” Liz has won numerous awards in regional exhibitions and her work has been shown throughout New England and as far away as Texas and the state of Washington. A member of the NH Potters Guild, League of NH Craftsmen and the NH Art Association, Liz enjoys being part of New Hampshire’s lively arts community.

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Elaine Xenelis Fuller

Inspired by nature and the exciting elements of clay, Elaine joyfully produces elegant and creative pottery. She makes teapots, pitchers, baking dishes, platters and her signature rim carved friendship and wedding bowls. Elaine makes smaller bowls which are lovely in the surprise that they afford. Mixing two or more colors of recycled clay, Elaine leaves the outside unglazed in order to see the pattern the two clays make. The inside is glazed to make it functional. Along with her hand-built and wheel thrown pottery, Elaine has made 100 bowls for her New Hampshire Food Bank project, “100 Bowls, 100 Meals.” All of the pottery is lead-free, oven proof, microwave and dishwasher safe. Elaine teaches pottery and is a member of several pottery councils. Elaine wakes up every morning excited to begin her work!

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Michael Gibbons

Michael Gibbons of Nutfield Pottery creates a variety of stoneware pottery including bowls, mugs, piggy banks and more! Mike does not use any molds or presses to create his work; every piece is thrown on the wheel, decorated by hand, then glazed and fired to around 2300 degrees Fahrenheit. Ideal for everyday use, each piece is one of a kind. Working with clay for over 30 years, Michael enjoys introducing students to this medium and sharing own enthusiasm for creating. Taking inspiration from his beautiful home state, New Hampshire, natural themes and colors flow throughout his work, from the reds of a New England autumn, to the varied blues, creams and greens of the seacoast. Michael is a juried member of The League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and has over 15 years of experience as a public school teacher. His work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Ellen Grenadier

Ellen Grenadier of Grenadier Pottery has been making tableware, custom tiles, and murals for over 30 years. Ten years ago, she moved her studio and gallery to the Berkshires. Her current work is stoneware that incorporates impressions of leaves in elegant bowls, plates, sushi platters, dinnerware, tea service, vases and more. All her pieces are glazed with natural cobalt blues, copper greens and ambers made from iron. Her energetic use of slips and glazes layered in the wet and bisque state adds to the depth of the surface quality. Her work is a stylish blend of well crafted refined form and rich surfaces that are alive with subtle texture and colors.

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Wendy Jackson

Wendy Jackson creates wood-fired pottery featuring sgraffito images of animals and trees. With deep hue variations and rich surface texture, Wendy’s work reflects a deep appreciation for the wood-firing process. A method that is often demanding and lengthy, not only does Wendy prepare the wood, but she must also maintain and fire the kiln. Although laborious, the process is very rewarding as the extreme heat and wood ash produces a stunning array of results. Having dabbled in the clay medium for years, the majority of Wendy’s pieces are built from porcelain clay slabs. Many of those pieces feature beautiful surface patterns achieved through the sgraffito technique of carving through a clay surface to expose the layer below. Wendy waits till the piece reaches a leather-hardened state before carving her naturalistic designs. For her tree silhouette work, Wendy applies a slip glaze, a thin mixture of clay with colorant, that provides a sharp contrast between the plain clay body and slip glaze that turns black when fired. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Wendy’s work can be found in galleries across the state.

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Carol Keiser

Carol Keiser is a nationally known exhibiting artist who paints on both canvas and tile. Working in her Vermont studio, Carol creates rich and colorful images that include scenes of women at leisure, romantic couples, flowers, still life’s and landscapes. Influenced from having lived in Mexico and visiting other places, like Italy and Costa Rica, Carol will often use symbols in her work, like mountains, water, sun, moon and stars, sailboats and ladders, subjects that represent our natural world and our connection to the divine. Each tile is designed and hand painted by Carol, using a palette of glaze colors and kiln-fired for permanence. The tiles can be installed in kitchens, bathrooms, spas, fireplace surrounds, or a single tile can be framed or unframed and enjoyed as a small work of art. Carol’s paintings and tile work have been exhibited in galleries in the United States and Mexico. She is a member of the Vermont State Craft Centers, The New Hampshire League of Arts and Crafts, The Newbury Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston. Her biography has been included in Who’s Who of America and Who’s Who of American women.

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Christy Knox

Christy Knox of Natural Elements creates handmade pottery using leaves, blossoms and other natural materials collected from her garden in Massachusetts. Fired to a high temperature and glazed with a lead free glaze, each piece is unique and fully functional. Believing that part of the true joy of creating functional art is in the handling and daily interaction with a finished piece, throughout the course of the day, whether gardening, creating or interacting with others, Christy’s pots are a part and product of it all. Her earliest memories are of playing in the garden and walking in the woods. Feeling fortunate to have stumbled upon clay, for over 30 years, Christy has often found herself awe-struck by the visual interplay of color, texture, pattern and natural form. This experience is ever changing, fleeting and unique. Often her designs reflect the moment it was created in, growing, evolving and expanding, much like the clay itself. “My exploration of form and color has carried me around and through the natural landscape. It is a personal journey, my relationship to the earth. It is my hope that each piece carries to you a part of that joy, bringing it into your home and into your life!”

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Sharon Lee

Fascinated with the surface texture of an object, Sharon Lee’s creates rustic stoneware pottery with warm earth tones that echo the natural surface of clay. Making each piece by hand with traditional techniques including: slab building, coil construction, pinching, Sharon tries to leave some evidence of the seams where she has joined the pieces of clay. She then adds any impressed designs that appeals to her, resulting in a unique, organic piece pottery. To accentuate the texture Sharon covers the entire piece with a coloring oxide then wipes off the surface so that only the indentations hold the stain. Sometimes she uses a glaze and sometimes she leaves the work unglazed. The pieces are then fired to maturation. The materials she uses are not toxic and her work is completely safe for use with food. Sharon studied art at the Museum School in Boston and received an MFA from Tufts University. Her main focus was printing, specifically intaglio printing of any kind (etching, collagraph, wood cuts, etc.) that would emphasize the surface texture. Surface texture continues to interest her and has become a main focus in her ceramic work. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and New Hampshire Arts Association, Sharon’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Naomi Lindenfeld

Naomi Lindenfeld’s elegant colored porcelain pieces are both functional and decorative, intended for daily use as well as for special gatherings. Inspired by her love of dance and patterns in the natural world, Naomi uses various techniques to experiment with color to create different moods and unique patterns. The primary process involves layering colored clay into a block. Patterns are created by pressing tools down into the block and then slicing it, or rolling out the layered clay, carving away strips, and rolling it flat again to create a multi-dimensional effect. The clay is then hand built into its finished form, or thrown on a wheel. Naomi often carves into the surface, which reveals mesmerizing striations of color. A member of the NH Potter’s Guild and an award winning juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Naomi has been the featured artisan in fine craft galleries around the country.

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Devitt Liptak

With inspiration from Pre-Columbian and Egyptian vessels, the patterns of snow drifts, and the granite walls of New Hampshire, Devitt’s pottery takes its form with a focus on the details of the shape, feet, handles, surface, and volume. Wheel thrown, altered, handbuilt, or a combination of all three are Devitt’s pottery building techniques. Fascinated by texture, she will mark, scrape, stamp, and apply or take away clay from the surface of a pot. The process is finished with firing techniques that include electric, pit, raku, smoke, and wood fire. Devitt received a BFA from Kent State University and has furthered her studies with workshops and intensive studies including Native American Clay, Techniques, and Firing classes. Devitt is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and New Hampshire Potter’s Guild.

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Adam MacMillan

Adam MacMillan of Surfside Ceramic Studios works alongside his family creating stunning crystalline glazes on porcelain pottery. A high fire glaze process, crystalline glazes can be extremely difficult to produce, with only a few potters working in this technique. A combination of specific glaze formulation, application, and firing techniques, despite meticulous attention to detail, the results are often unpredictable. Firing the glazed work at about 2000 degrees Fahrenheit, the crystals that grow on the pottery are just like gems found in nature, with no two exactly alike. All of the pieces are hand thrown or slab formed and each is truly one of a kind. The crystals are permanent and will not fade or change over time, but due to the texture and porous nature of the surface, these pieces should not be used to store food. Adam, who studied mechanical engineering, is naturally drawn to working with clay. He enjoys the technical aspects of ceramics and has been making pots for 15 years. With a combined experience of over 90 years working in clay, the MacMillan family’s beautiful work can be found in galleries in Massachusetts and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Ty Minton

Ty Minton, a native of New Mexico, first studied art with his mother, Helen L. Minton, an accomplished Southwestern oil painter. He continued his art education at New Mexico State University and the University of Colorado where he studied botany, art and chemistry. Although his major work is in clay, Ty has worked in wood, handmade paper, fiber, metal, paint, graphics and photography. Much of his work reflects the influence of his interest in Southwestern Native American design and technique. Many of his clay works are finished with hand polished fine clay slip (Terra Sigellata) and painted with intricate stylized animal and plant designs. In addition to his artwork, he holds a doctorate in environmental studies. He views his combined career of environmentalist/artist as a natural outcome of his interest in both the function and the form of the natural world. Ty Minton is a juried member of the League of the New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Irina Okula

Irina Okula’s inspiration for the creation of her clay objects goes back to her long interest in Native American pottery. She loves the polished surfaces they produce without glazes and uses many of their techniques of construction and firing. After visiting pueblos in New Mexico and Arizona, Irina marveled at the beautiful landscapes. Her work echoes these influences. Large open bowls are thrown and then used as a canvas. Irina collects natural combustible materials to use in the firing process. The materials are placed in and around each piece where the fire and combustibles will dance upon the clay leaving exciting random marks. The patterns invoke the fiery chaos of nature, contrasted with the calm and serene patterns of cloudy skyscapes and geologic formations. Each bowl is one-of-a-kind and goes through many firings. Irina received a BA in Art from Fontbonne College and a MFA in Ceramics from Southern Illinois University. Irina is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Malea Rhodes

Malea Rhodes is a graduate of East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. She has studied ceramics, surface design and firing methods since 1997, honing her craft in wheel thrown porcelain with attention to delicate surface treatments. Each pot is thrown on a potter’s wheel, trimmed, carved, inlaid and scalloped by hand. No two pots are ever exactly alike. Some pieces have raised details, called slip trailing, added while the pots are still damp to the touch. The process for a single pot from start to finish takes around 10-14 days including firings. Each piece is fired twice in her kiln to ensure durability. Most glazes are mixed in house and all are food safe.

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Cathy & Dave Robinson

For over 45 years, Dave and Cathy Robinson have created works of beauty for use in our everyday lives. Their colorful, functional and decorative pottery is characterized by their signature band of multiple colors that flows across and around their pieces. Inspired by nature, the Robinsons’ designs often evoke the rolling hills of New England, the ocean or sky. While largely self taught, the Robinsons’ art was influenced by an earlier generation of New Hampshire potters who were essential to the formative development of their craft. Cathy and Dave opened Robinson studios to the public in the mid-60’s. Their home, studios and kilns, which they built themselves, are located on 30 wooded acres surrounded by the foothills of the White Mountains. The Robinsons are members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Steve & Sue Russell

The Russells believe that through the artist’s skill, aesthetics and passion, clay can be transformed into three-dimensional object of art. The couple have been influenced by backcountry camping trips to the canyon lands of the southwest, Art Nouveau and Deco, psychedelic poster art of the 1960’s and their admiration of ancient and modern pottery. The Russells’ pottery includes bowls, casseroles, drinking vessels, French butter keepers and vases. They also make stunning Raku fired vases with dramatic swirls of intense color. Many of the pieces are incised with botanical or free flowing geometric designs. Steve is a native Californian. There he met Sue, born and raised in New Hampshire. In 2003, they moved to New Hampshire where the natural beauty of their surroundings created a peaceful space in which to live and work. The Russells are members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Sibylle & Ron Tornow

The graceful shapes and elegant sumi-e style of brush work of Sibylle's pottery has long been inspired by nature and her love of flowers. For years, the popular Peach Blossom and Blue Leaf pottery have been added to collections. A new style, the Botanical Impressions, is decorated by pressing Sibylle's own herbs, flowers and leaves in wet clay. Sibylle established her pottery business in 1981. She was introduced to clay by a friend. Sibylle says, "touching the clay for the first time gave me a feeling that I enjoy today." In 1986, her husband, Ron, joined her. Ron and Sibylle both studied fine art and graphic design in Europe and the United States. A watercolor artist, Sibylle has also studied fashion design at the Fashion Institute of Technology in NYC. The Tornows are members of the New Hampshire Potters Guild and the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Lars & Connie Turin

Ceramic artists Lars and Connie Turin of Lars Turin Clayworks began their collaboration both professional and in life in 2012. Prior to meeting Connie, Lars worked as an art instructor, but his first love was always creating pottery. Working under the guise of “Hillplace Pottery,” Lars perfected his technique while also teaching and raising his family. Connie’s fascination with ceramics began in high school. She spent her summers as a potter’s apprentice, only to shift gears and head in other directions until she and Lars began collaborating. Utilizing his skill on the potters wheel, Lars creates incredible one-of-a-kind textural vessels by employing a technique that forces the clay surface to fracture as he expands and refines the form. Working in a variety of clays and pottery techniques, Lars unique sculptural pieces are often created with a central theme, connecting nature and people while highlighting the dynamics between them. Connie focuses on a variety of hand building methods. Like Lars, she uses the fracturing technique to create more organic vases and bowls. Inspired by color, Connie’s interest in surface treatments can be seen in her intricate sgraffito pieces and hand painted ‘story’ cups and bowls. Living and working in Southern Maine has captured the hearts and creative minds of the pair who continue to explore both the coast of Maine and their love of ceramic fine art and craft. Members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, their work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Sam Wild

Sam Wild works in porcelain with ball clay added, which is easier to use than straight porcelain. All of his pots are thrown on the potter's wheel and decorated with impressed and applied texture and motifs while the pots are still on the wheel. Because most stamps and molds can't be applied to a freshly thrown pot due to the fact that they would stick, Sam dries the pots somewhat with a torch as soon as they are thrown, prior to beginning to decorate them. The frog, beetle, and gecko designs are made from molds created by Sam. He adds these creatures to his work by placing the mold on the pot and pressing extra clay into the underside or inside of the pot, then pressing the surface of the pot into the mold. Sam graduated from Sandusky High School, Sandusky, Ohio, in 1960. He then spent 3 years in the U.S. Navy, traveling to Japan, Australia, Thailand and other Pacific destinations. After his discharge from the Navy, he earned his Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Fine Arts from Ohio University. In 1971, he established a home and studio in Potter Place, a village of Andover, New Hampshire, and lived there for 31 years, moving to Wilmot, New Hampshire in 2002.

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Prints/2-D

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Blueberry Cove Creations

Cathy Provoda of Blueberry Cove Creations creates Eco-friendly watercolor note cards inspired by nature. An outdoor enthusiast, Cathy enjoys gardening, hiking, swimming, canoeing, kayaking or walking. Her love of the natural world is reflected in much of Cathy’s imagery. If she can’t be outdoors, she is inside painting. She confesses, “If someone were to ask me what do you think about the most, my response would be the next painting I am going to paint." Cathy’s inspirations usually come from an experience she’s had. Whether it is a chance encountering with a Mallard duck or a flock of chickadees that flit from branch to branch, Cathy always keeps an eye out for new subject matter. Cathy’s cards are printed on recycled paper with soy based ink and come with a white envelope, tucked into an eco-clear compostable sleeve.

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Mary Borowski

Creating beautiful photographic cards featuring stunning scenery, wildlife, the seacoast and more, Mary Borowski of Mary B. Creations knows just how to take the perfect shot! Faithfully capturing the subtleties of light and shadow, nuances of the landscape and exciting wildlife inhabitants within, Mary has captured a vast array of subject matter. One of her favorite shots, featuring a loon, Mary just happened to be at the right place at the right time. She recalls that the loon landed right next to her boat and she was able to grab her camera and get a photo. With a keen eye for color, design and just a little luck, Mary’s note cards are miniature works of art.

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Matt Brown

A self-taught printmaker, Matt graduated from Harvard College, magna cum laude. Inspired by the ukiyo-e prints of Hiroshige, Harunobu, and others, Matt has adopted the traditional Japanese approach to woodblock printing. A “low tech” printing method, materials include rice paste, dry pigments, sumi ink, and water; multiple carved blocks, a hand-held baren and brushes are the printing tools. Matt loves the process of making these prints: “the way pictorial simplicity is encouraged, the way an image is separated into parts and put back together, the way the translucent colors blend and juxtapose, the way the wood interacts with the paper.” Each of Matt’s prints begins as an original drawing pasted face down on the first or “key” block. Once carved, impressions of the “key” block become the notches to help the registration to be accurate. Matt presses moistened paper onto the colored blocks to absorb the pigment using a traditional hand held flat disc called a baren. In addition to color woodblock printmaking, Matt also makes black and white prints using oil and inks, with a press or a baren. All prints are signed, numbered as part of a limited edition and dated with the actual month the print was made (an entire edition is not often printed at the same time).

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Kathleen Buchanan

Fascinated by relationships and her connection to the natural world, Kathleen enjoys observing the local landscape and its inhabitants. She sees these subjects not only as appealing compositional elements, but as metaphors for the human experience. Collagraph printing, with all its intricacy and subtlety, fascinates Kathleen. A collagraph is a handmade print created by rubbing ink on a collage printing plate and applying pressure to transfer the ink to paper. Kathleen uses Bristol paper and acrylic medium. Once the plates are made, they are inked with an oil based etching ink. Excess pigment is wiped away using a tarlatan (starched cheesecloth.) An etching press is used to print the plates one at a time, generally working from light to dark. The inked plate is laid to rest on the press bed with paper on top and felt blankets over the paper to cushion the plates as they run through the press.

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Carve Designs

Using beautiful designs made with Japanese origami paper, Paige Canfield of Carve Designs Vermont creates nature inspired note cards, bookmarks and calendars. After years of working as a furniture designer, making cards only for friends and family, Paige took a career detour and founded Carve Designs in 2012. Inspired by nature, many of Paige’s designs reflect her affinity for the natural world. Several years ago, while working in an art supply store in Oakland, CA, Paige came across Japanese Chiyogami paper and fell in love. Featuring many wonderfully decorative patterns, the Chiyogami paper seemed a natural fit for Paige’s work. Having grown up in the mountains of southern New Mexico, the imaginative spirit of that place has never completely left her. Yearning to leave the hustle and bustle of the urban world, Paige eventually settled in Calais, Vermont. Her beautiful notecards can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Jackie Cunningham

Passionate about painting, Jackie Cunningham’s representational work focuses on the beauty of a particular scene. Aiming to make people smile when they view her work, Jackie’s inspirations come from textures and “aromas.” She loves to paint flowers until you can smell them or take with you for a walk on a sunny day through a sunny pasture and smell the fresh air. “Mostly it is the local color of my subject and the lovely touch of its complementary color that gets me excited.” Sometimes everything else is put aside so she can paint the subject, at that very moment then and there. Living in New Hampshire, Jackie feels fortunate to have so many wonderful scenic areas to paint. Having painted professionally for the past 13 years, Jackie is a member of the Newburyport Art Association, Andover Artists Guild, Rockport Art Association(Contributing Member) and Seacoast Artists Association. Having received many awards for her work, Jackie’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Soosen Dunholter

Known for her minimalist style that focuses on the interplay between form, color, and line, Soosen Dunholter creates unique hand-pulled prints, encaustic and mixed media work. As an abstract artist working in many different mediums, Soosen enjoys the confluence of chance and experimentation. Her unique designs unify her love of color and pattern with her desire for storytelling. In love with the artistic process, Soosen focuses her attention initially on creating surface texture, then she continues to rework and add imagery with hand-pulled prints, scraps of antique papers, pencils, paint and/or direct transfer techniques. Soosen also creates whimsical encaustic pieces that feature her fanciful laundry line art. Soosen is a member of the Monotype Guild of New England, a Juried member of the New Hampshire Art Association and Cambridge Arts Association, board member of Friends of the Dublin Art Colony and The Healing Arts Gallery at Monadnock community Hospital. An award winning artist, Soosen’s work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions, in galleries and cultural centers throughout the country.

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Victoria Elbroch

Victoria Elbroch has lived a life rich and varied in culture, color and experience. Born in Chesire, England, she grew up in India and Pakistan and returned to the UK where her family settled in the picturesque region of East Anglia, which provided Victoria's first inspiration for her art. She married Larry Elbroch, and they moved to the United States and raised their family. Victoria studied at the Lock Haven Art Centerin Orlando followed by training at the University of Oklahoma. Studying and working with Loraine Moore influenced and transformed Victoria's knowledge and understanding of the art of printmaking. The family settled on the coast of Maine where Victoria continues to draw inspiration. Her years in and around New England have provided a wellspring of material and she continues to win awards for her work. Victoria is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and the New Hampshire Art Association.

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Ann Eldridge

Creating stunning intaglio prints, J. Ann Eldridge ‘s work celebrates the simple beauty of our natural world. An artist and conservationist, Ann believes she is merely a reporter recording the course of her days. Her work not only reflects a keen eye for observation, but an appreciation and passion for art. Drawn to the immediacy of drawing, Ann sees printmaking as an extension of the medium. Involving many stages, Ann’s prints begin with a single copper plate that is heated to allow a beeswax/asphaltum varnish to coat the surface. After being smoothed with a roller, Ann smokes the surface black with a candle. She then etches fine lines into the varnished plate with a needle, exposing the copper. The plate is then set in a ferric chloride solution which etches the copper where the lines were drawn. After the wax is removed, the plate is inked and rolled through a hand operated press to print the image onto dampened paper. A native New Englander, Ann earned a BFA in Printmaking from the Massachusetts College of Art. Having studied botany and horticulture at the University of New Hampshire, Ann has also written and illustrated various publications, including a collaboration on a limited edition of handmade books based on ten Robert Frost poems. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Ann’s work can be found in galleries throughout the northeast.

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Michael Ficara

Photo artist Michael Anthony Ficara of Eye Candy Photo Work combines photography with a little ingenuity to create eye-catching pictures that challenge the senses. Enjoying photography as an avocation and inspired by the many wonderful elements of Mother Nature including her flowers, wild life, landscapes, townscapes and building structures, Michael has a distinctive way of capturing his subjects, having taken a number of photo images around his home area and on various trips including a 25 state photo tour called "The Great American Road Trip." Using an Olympus Digital Camera System, Mike relies on his photographic eye to capture unique snapshots for the viewer's pleasure. Getting "Up Close and Personal" with each of his subjects, many of Michaels images allow the viewer the chance to create their own photographic story. Having lived in New England his entire life, Micheal now calls Exeter, NH home.

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RGerberPrint

Richard Gerber

With artistic interests that cover a wide range of media, Rick Gerber creates stunning woodblock prints. Carving into a block of wood, Rick leaves areas exposed to pick up ink that is later rolled onto the surface. After carefully applying a sheet of paper onto the wood block, Rick transfers the ink to the paper by passing the block through a steel etching press. The image gradually emerges as the printable areas of the wood block are slowly whittled away. The finished result is a piece rich with color, texture and movement. Rick has studied at the Art Institute of Boston and Monserrat College of Art. His work has been published by the Orvis Company and Gray’s Sporting Journal, as well as other publications. An ‘Arts for the Park’ bronze medal winner and Blanche Colman Grant recipient, Rick’s work can be found in corporate and private collections across the Northeast and the American West. Rick lives and works in Fremont, NH.

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Don Gorvett

Creating reduction woodcut prints that echo the abstract geometric shapes and distant outlines of Northeastern architecture, Don’s work is both powerful and beautiful. Don’s prints evolve from a drawing (usually from life) that he transfers to a plank of wood. He then carves into the wood block, leaving exposed areas that pick up ink, he later rolls onto the surface. After carefully applying a sheet of paper on pins at the end of the wood block, Don transfers the ink to the paper by passing the block through a steel etching press. The image gradually emerges as the printable areas of the wood block are whittled away. The finished result is a piece rich with color, texture and movement that captures the energy of the landscape, without diminishing its beauty. A graduate of the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Don’s work can be found in galleries throughout the east coast.

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CGreenPrint

Catherine Green

Inspired by the timeless elegance of the Renaissance period, Catherine produces stunning imagery that emphasizes color, form, pattern and detail. Her work, which often features natural elements in the New England landscape, reflects her mastery of the silkscreen process. Silkscreen (also known as serigraphy or screenprinting) is a stencil based process of printmaking in which a design is imposed on a screen of silk or other fine mesh. Using a tool called a squeegee, ink is passed through the open areas of the stencil creating precise designs on the printing surface. Several stencils can be used for a multi-colored print. Catherine is involved in every part of creating her prints, from the conception of the work to its intricate execution. Due to the complexity of an image, Catherine can use as many as forty-five separate hand cut stencils and may take up to six months to complete a single print. Originally from Montana, Catherine eventually settled in Southern New Hampshire. Receiving her BFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, Catherine has done graduate work at Tufts University. In addition to printmaking, Catherine has also worked as a graphic designer, calligrapher and art instructor. She is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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BIversonFlower

Bruce Iverson

Bringing a 3,000 year-old tradition to life, Bruce uses a style called "hsieh-I" a spontaneous style of painting that allows him to capture images of the natural world. As per tradition, which encourages artist’s to wander outdoors, observe nature and then paint from memory, Bruce creates his work using traditional brush painting tools. Dubbed the "Four Treasures," these simple, yet elegant tools include: hand ground sumi ink, bamboo brushes, a carved inkstone and hand made rice papers. Though often appearing straightforward, the art of Asian Brush Painting demands a high level of skill, concentration and knowledge of the materials. Once the brush is committed to paper, there is no turning back or touching up— success or failure in an instant! Bruce signs each piece with the traditional red seal or "chop," a hand-carved stamp in Asian characters that designates the artist's name and studio. Having been painting in this manner since 1972, Bruce studied with master brush painters, Jean Shen, Hsiung Ju and Ning Yeh. A juried member of the New Hampshire Art Association, Bruce teaches various workshops in the medium. His work can be found in corporate and private collections in the United States, Europe, Canada and Australia.

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IslandDesignsCard

Island Designs

Chong and Judi Lim of Island Designs create beautifully embossed designs and handmade paper. Collaborating on images, the process begins with Chong drawing each design that he will later carve into a metal plate. Once the plate is carved, fiberglass is then cast into the plate to create a counter image. Judi then attaches the fiberglass counter image to a press, which she pushes down onto a sheet of paper to make an embossed design of the image. For the smaller images, color mixed with wax is sprayed onto a Mylar carrier that is placed wax side down over the counter. The heated plate melts the wax and transfers the color simultaneously as the paper is embossed. Larger designs are airbrushed and/or added to original watercolor paintings. Judi also makes handmade paper and embeds plant fibers into the paper mats using a heated hydraulic press. The Lims find the possibilities in combining various papers with pressed and painted colors very exciting. They enjoy expressing that enthusiasm and joy they experience in their creative adventures. Often their images are representational, sometimes they border on the surreal, with a style somewhere between Eastern and Western influences. Chong immigrated to the US from Korea when he was thirteen. Before long, he graduated from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design with a major in printmaking and moved with his wife Judi to Massachusetts. There he worked for a company creating plates to emboss names and logos inside shoes as well as plates for greeting cards, perfume boxes and other applications. Eventually, Chong and Judi moved to Great Cranberry Island off the coast of Maine to start a business creating plates for similar applications. A chance suggestion by an island neighbor prompted Chong and Judi to carve a metal plate to make their Christmas cards that year. Judi also studied printmaking and painting in college. Their artwork can be found in galleries throughout the Northeast and Midwest.

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DJohnsonTree

Douglas Johnson

Creating beautifully elaborate and meticulous works of art out of seed (or small) beads, Doug Johnson’s work can contain as much as 300,000 individual beads. Having first come into contact with the beading process in the 1970’s, Doug’s work expanded from stringing necklaces to weaving elaborate works of art. Working from various sized looms he created to accommodate his ever growing and detailed bead art, Doug works from sketches, photographs, or for highly technical pieces, bead graph paper where he can map out his ideas. Learning to work with beads as a way to pass the time, Doug soon became fascinated with the medium. Over the decades, his simple hobby grew into an award winning passion. Having been featured on NH Chronicle, Doug’s work has also been exhibited at art shows in Boston, Cape Cod and can be found in galleries across the country.

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ALazloDuckCard

Anne Laszlo

Through her travels, Anne Laszlo has developed quite the photographic eye. Creating beautiful photographic cards featuring both local and foreign architecture, fauna, birds, animals and more, Anne’s photos are miniature works of art in card form. From Guatemala and Spain, to right in her own backyard here in Exeter, Anne faithfully captures the subtleties of light and shadow, nuances of the landscape and exciting wildlife inhabitants within. She is particularly drawn to birds and features many different species in her work. Having captured a vast array of subjects, Anne’s cards can be used for any occasion.

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CLummusPrint

Carol Lummus

Carol Lummus creates imaginative Intaglio limited edition prints that poke fun at social conventions. Carol’s work is appealing both visually and intellectually, as she couples distinctive softly colored images of quirky characters with titles that are witty and thought provoking. Carol’s Intaglio process involves her lines on a copper plate through a resist. The inked plate is printed one at a time on archival paper, signed and numbered. Carol originally studied and worked as a painter. It was not until she taught herself how to use an etching press, that she discovered the perfect medium for her passion for drawing and light hearted social commentary. Carol is currently one of the leading printmakers in the country and is listed in “Who’s Who in American Art.” Her work is in galleries and exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad, including the Currier Museum of Art and the National Association of Women Artists.

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PCLumpkinsTheSky

Peggy Clark Lumpkins

Painting intricate close-ups of flowers, dazzling seascapes and scrumptious vegetables, Peggy Clark Lumpkin's work reflects her intent to preserve, and raise awareness to, the stunning scenery around us. Peggy’s work begins with the planting of a seed, bulb or twig, watching the sprouts mature, waiting sometimes years for the flowers to develop, until that one special bloom reveals itself. She then studies the blossom, first making several quick sketches before moving on to more detailed drawings and photos. After stretching and priming the canvas, Peggy draws directly on it before reaching for her paintbrush. Layers of paints and glazes slowly build up on the canvas, the process often taking a year or more, before the final image emerges. Working on several pieces at a time, there is never an empty easel in Peggy’s studio. Born in New York City, as a youth Peggy had a passion for drawing. At the age of ten, Peggy began going to a private art school where she learned to paint with oils. From there she attended the High School of Art & Design, followed by a year at The Academy of Art College in San Francisco and another year at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn N.Y. With flowers being Peggy’s most painted subject matter, in 1987 she moved to Maine where she built a garden of endless inspiration. After a 14-year stint working with woven tapestries, Peggy returned to painting in 2001. With both subtle and dramatic shifts in color and luminosity, Peggy’s work is not only awe-inspiring, but provides a unique snapshot of the natural beauty that surrounds us.

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MigrantWindsSilkScreenCard

Migrant Winds

Connie Barbour of Migrant Winds creates stunning silkscreened art with many themes about the human spirit, as well as a few other subjects that inspire me. Seeing the visual world as patterns overlapping and set in front of her, Connie tries to faithfully recreate these elements in her work. Each theme uses different patterns that are achieved through the silkscreen process. Also known as serigraphy or screen-printing, Silkscreen is a stencil-based process of printmaking in which a design is imposed on a screen of silk or other fine mesh. Using a tool called a squeegee, ink is passed through the open areas of the stencil creating precise designs on the printing surface. Several stencils can be used for a multi-colored print. All of the printing is done by Connie herself, “with TLC on acid neutral paper so that the prints can last for years.” Connie’s work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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WMitchellWinterPrint

William Mitchell

William Mitchell has been working on serigraph prints of the New Hampshire landscape since 1983. Bill gathers inspiration for his prints while hiking and skiing in New Hampshire. Each serigraph is printed by hand using traditional screenprinting techniques. Bill uses only one screen to achieve his prints using the block-out fluid method. After printing a color, the corresponding area of the screen is filled with glue or lacquer. The next sequential color is then printed on top of the previous. Bill enjoys demonstrating this process at craft fairs and teaching classes with the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Bill is a juried member of the League of New Hampsshire Craftsmen.

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BPeckWinterPrint

Bruce Peck

Bruce Peck is an American printmaker who was born and raised in India. He holds degrees in Political Science and Biology, but pursued a career in etching after taking a printmaking course at Southern Illinois University. He has been making etchings for over 20 years, exploring in detail the beauty and character of the New England landscape. Bruce etches and prints all of his copper plates himself and hand colors the resulting prints. He is committed to creating etchings of the finest quality using traditional techniques and modern archival materials. The artist works from his printmaking studio in E. Topsham, Vermont and is represented by galleries in New England and India. He has also produced numerous etchings of India where he lives for part of the year. Bruce creates his etchings by drawing the image with a needle on a copper plate that is covered with an acid resistant coating. The plate is then placed in an acid solution to etch the lines drawn by the artist. The plate is cleaned and covered with ink. The excess ink is wiped off carefully, leaving some ink trapped in the etched lines. The inked plate is placed on the press bed, covered with paper, and pulled through the press. The heavy pressure of the etching press forces the paper against the plate and transfers the ink to the paper to create the etching. After the print is dry, it is hand colored with watercolor. Bruce prints his etchings in limited signed editions on 100% rag print paper. Each original etching is hand pulled and hand colored by the artist. Framed pieces are mounted with acid free materials in black metal frames. Bruce's etchings are also available in black and white without the handcoloring.

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HPhelpsPrint

Hannah Phelps

A northern New England native, award-winning printmaker Hannah Phelps creates relief prints that are a result of her continuous exploration of the local landscape and forces at work there. With either watercolor and a wooden spoon or oil ink and an etching press, Hannah creates stunning seascape and landscape prints using plein air paintings as inspiration and reference. Many of her prints are created using the white line woodcut process. Using a sketch Hannah draws on paper, she transfers the image onto a piece of wood. She then carves into the outlines of the piece creating the “white-lines” in the final print. The wood left untouched now stands in relief from the lines. Hannah attaches a piece of paper to the edge of the woodblock to ensure that it lays on the wood the same way each time she places it against the block in a process called, “registration”. Hannah then inks one shape with watercolor using a brush to apply the paint. She flips the paper down on the block then uses the back of a spoon to transfer the paint onto the paper. She repeats this process until all of the shapes are impressed on the paper. Once satisfied with the image, Hannah removes it and prepares for the next print. “The block can be printed several times, but no two will ever really be alike, so each piece becomes a combination of print and original painting.” A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Hannah’s work can be found in galleries and exhibitions throughout the country.

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ASanbornCalligraphy

Adele Sanborn

Combining her love of mixed media, watercolors and photography into meaningful messages, Adele Sanborn of Corningstone Design creates touching calligraphic art, often on her own handmade paper. Dedicating over 30 years to the fine art of lettering, Adele works at her studio, “Twiggs,” nestled on a hill overlooking farmland and the Merrimack River in Boscawen, NH. Surrounded by the idyllic scenery, Adele’s studio gives her the space and tranquility to create and explore new and diverse ideas in the craft of ink, paper and photography. A self-taught folk artist, Adele has been a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen since 1975. Trained as a technical photographer, Adele was delighted to discover alternative ways of developing photos, including Polaroid transfers and Lazertran copy material. "It's created a great way to combine my photography with my love of calligraphy," she explains. Born and raised in Long Island, NY, Adele received a BFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology and moved to Boscawen, NH in the early '70s. She and her husband dairy farmed together until 1984 when Adele started Cornerstone Design. Also a juried member of the New Hampshire Art Association and the WCA of NH, Adele’s work can be found in galleries throughout New England.

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MSmithBlueHeron

Matthew Smith

Matthew Smith of Quincy Pond Printworks is a printmaker. A former commercial fishing boat captain, Matthew now translates his love of the sea and admiration of marine life into etchings printed from copper plates. As the captain of the Charlotte G back in the 1980’s, Matthew’s mission was to catch and bring back as many fish as possible, as safely and efficiently as possible. Matthew made innovative nets to catch haddock and halibut in the North Atlantic. He put together the best fishing-boat crews to deploy the gear he made. He followed his instincts to go to places on the Georges’ Banks where the fish were, but the other fishermen were not. As an artist, he created a new way to make prints – copper block etching – that combines the top features of intaglio etching and relief printing to best portray the incredible color, depth and texture found in his work. Matthew gave up his life at sea for a life on paper, paper he impresses, one sheet at a time, with his copper block etchings of fish, crabs, turtles and all sorts of other sea and shore creatures. Matthew hopes that his works will be a gentle reminder of the magnificence of our oceans and the fragile circle of life on this planet we all share. Matthew is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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MMSweeneyPrint

Mary Margaret Sweeney

Mary Margaret Sweeney is best known for her beautiful etchings with details so precise and intricate that they are often mistaken for photographs. She is inspired by the New England landscape and one can sense Mary Margaret’s deep connection with all of her subjects. Her images of mountains, forests, coastal scenes, interiors and animals are both visually stunning and contemplative. Mary’s printmaking process begins with a metal plate (copper, zinc, or brass) which is covered with an acid-proof coating. She sketches onto the plate and once the process is complete, ink is rubbed into the etched lines. The surface is wiped clean and the plate is printed. Each signed and numbered hand pulled print is an original work of art. Mary studied at The Chicago Art Institute and the University of New Hampshire. Her work is exhibited nationally and internationally. Mary Margaret is a juried member of Boston Printmakers, the New York Society of American Graphic Artists, the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and the New Hampshire Art Association.

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Joan Szoke

Noted for her unique botanical arts including pressed flower illustrations, pen and ink and watercolor nature prints, Joan Szoke of Remembered Gardens relies on her musical training for the composition of line, form, harmony and contrast in her work. Her beautiful flower pieces are delicately arranged into unique designs. Using only real flowers and plant materials in her art, Joan uses a wide range of flowers grown from seed. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Joan has not only taught workshops about the pressed flower technique, but also displays her work at galleried throughout the state.

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Carol VanLoon

Carol Van Loon is a black and white photographer who sees a world full of contrasts, forms and patterns. Using her vision to capture evocative scenes of environments and structures, Carol’s work conveys stillness, permanence and sometimes abandonment. Growing up on a farm in western New York, Carol was surrounded by the scenic beauty of rural life. This farm shaped her vision and became her first photographic subject. After the loss of her mother and a dear friend, Carol abandoned her photography in mourning. Then, after taking a spontaneous journey back to her roots, her memories conjured long forgotten stories. As she took photos of barns, the subject matter of her youth, she realized that as much as she had strayed from her beginnings, “the sensibilities that were formed there could lead me to the next chapter of my life.” By combining the many images she had taken and the story of her journey, Carol’s Barn book came about. The book pays homage to the gifts her parents gave her, the farm she grew up on and the vanishing landscape of my childhood. Earning a BFA in Photography from Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, NY, Carol is a member of the New Hampshire Art Association, the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists. Her work has been shown in numerous group and solo shows.

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WildIvyDesignsBirdCard

Wild Ivy Designs

Suzan Scribner-Reed of Wild Ivy Designs creates collaged paper jewelry and precious note cards. Her jewelry, comprised of found recycled papers she embellishes with paint, antique beads, semiprecious stones, hand turned findings, and gold filled and sterling silver wire features her original images. Inspired by nature, her beautifully collaged bird designs are also featured on her note cards. Having worked as a jewelry designer since 1994, Suzan has been working with paper since 1991. A member of the Maine Crafts Guild, Suzan’s work can be found in galleries and art shows throughout the east coast.

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WoodfieldPressCardSpring

Woodfield Press

Reminiscent of Beatrix Potter and Tasha Tudor, Cindy Hendrick of Woodfield Press creates whimsically illustrated cards featuring animals and delightful captions. Growing up in the hills of western Connecticut in a pre-revolutionary farmhouse, Cindy was surrounded by hundreds of acres of woods and fields to explore and observe the many animals that lived there. In addition to observing the many wounded animals that found themselves coming in and out of her home, Cindy also studied family pets for her childhood drawings. Brought up in a creative environment, both of Cindy’s parents were painters, with her father also working as a cartoonist. His series, “The Mountain Boys" appeared in various magazines and syndicated newspapers from the 1930s through the 1960s. Cindy employs the same techniques her cartoonist father did while working on a strip. Creating her illustrations on an old wooden drawing table with a metal base and an attached swivel shelf, Cindy spreads out her watercolors on a big butcher’s tray. Having studied art at UNH, the Manchester Institute for the Arts and privately with many accomplished painters and artists, Cindy’s wonderful cards can be found at shops across the country.

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MYoungCalligraphy

Marilyn Young

Marilyn Young is a skillful and talented calligrapher and lettering artist that creates beautiful calligraphic art, often with delicate imagery. Using watercolors, decorative papers and various colored inks, Marilyn’s artwork features graceful scenes and meaningful messages. With a variety of quotes, from one’s love of books, to an appreciation for nature, Marilyn’s work represents a number of themes. Living and working out of her Stratham, NH home, Marilyn’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Glass
Kathy Blackmer

Kathy Blackmer of “Our Glass Studio” creates both functional and sculptural pieces of art glass. Taking inspiration from her surroundings, Kathy enjoys depicting various places she has seen or experiences she has had through her glasswork. By combining color and texture, she can create a plethora of unique patterns, resulting in work full of movement, depth and dimension. Working with either stained glass or warm (kiln-formed) glass, her process can vary. Creating a stained glass piece involves cutting and fitting the glass pieces precisely, wrapping each piece of glass with an adhesive copper foil and then soldering them together along the length of the seams. Kathy then cleans the work and applies a Patina finish. Her kiln formed glass technique varies depending on whether the artist is fusing two or more layers of glass or slumping (heating glass at lower a temperature to achieve a desire shape.) The slumping process often involves the use of a mold to form the glass. Having worked with glass since 1981, Kathy combined her love of the medium with a Business Technology degree. Creating, “Our Glass Studio” in 1989, she teaches classes in stained and fused glass, sells raw materials & displays her own creations. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Kathy’s work can be found in galleries and private collections throughout New England.

KBlackmerGlassShadowBox

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Bruce Cobb

Creating a variety of hand-blown glasswork, including vases, bowls, candle sticks, ornaments and delightful birds, Bruce Cobb works without a helper or use of any molds. Relying on a technique based on the 19th century American Lily Pad Design, Bruce gives his pieces a contemporary twist, with the design taking on a wave-like pattern. In addition to being decorative, the design elements also perform as grippers making it less likely for an item to slip out of one's hand. They also provide extra sturdiness to the work. Bruce began his training in glassblowing in 1976, as an apprentice at the Pairpoint Glass Company in Sagamore, Massachusetts. The work fascinated him and he advanced rapidly through the stages of apprenticeship. In 1981, he moved to New Hampshire to work as an assistant to Richard Harkness, a glassblower in Epsom. It was there that he applied the production-oriented techniques learned at Pairpoint to a studio situation, with the freedom to work with many different styles and a wide range of colors. In 1983, he took a job at a printing company, while working on building the glassblowing equipment he needed as time and money permitted. Finally, he began his own studio in Pittsfield, NH, becoming a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen shortly thereafter. Bruce’s work can be found In fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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Trish Dalto

Trish Dalto began blowing glass in 1989 as a student at Franklin Pierce College. Right away she knew that it would be challenging and very hot, but she was hooked. Trish started working for another glass blower where she began to produce and sell her own designs. Her first studio, North Country Glass, was opened in 1995, with a partner. Their hand-blown glass pieces sold locally and across the country. In 2012, Trish went out on her own. Her production includes a range of decorative and functional glass vases, bowls, tumblers, paper weights and ornaments. All of the pieces are original designs, free formed and one-of-a-kind. Trish is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

TDaltoVase

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Erin Finney

Erin Finney of Erin Finney Glass Designs creates unique kiln fired glass jewelry and mosaics. Having grown up in West Virginia, after college Erin spent time absorbing the artistic influences in San Francisco before settling in Northern New Hampshire. Starting her business in 1990, Erin an elementary school teacher and artist, creates her work along side her dog Luke in the mountaintop studio that she and her husband built. The vibrant periwinkle and yellow studio is surrounded by nature and is both the perfect place for Erin to create her beautiful art and a testament to her passion for color and life. Erin's initial jewelry designs were based on the traditional stained glass copper foil method commonly known as "flat glass." The vision to design earrings using combinations of layered glass with individual movement was the impetus for exploring alternative processes, such kiln firing, commonly known as "hot glass." Erin has participated in numerous glass and jewelry making workshops taught by master craftspeople. Having always been enamored with mosaics, in 2013 Erin was awarded a scholarship by the League of New Hampshire Craftsman to participate in a mosaic mural workshop with Isaiah Zagar of Philadelphia's Magic Garden. Erin now creates individual thematic mosaics as well as mosaic murals working collaboratively with individuals to create custom pieces of special places, pets, people and things. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsman, Erin’s work can be found at many galleries throughout the country.

EFinneyEarrings

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Mark & Kathleen Frank

Mark and Kathleen Frank of Renaissance Glassworks create traditional and contemporary stained glass art pieces ranging from jewelry boxes and lampshades to hanging panels, mirrors and windows. Each one of their designs is handcrafted, and when added to a room, illuminates its surroundings with a brilliant spectrum of color and light. “The magical look of beveled glass, when combined with clear textured or colored glass, will add drama to any setting.” Flowers and trees, butterflies and dragonflies, geese, loons and fish are all beautifully depicted in glass. In addition to creating one-of-a-kind designs and custom work, the Franks also restore vintage stained glass pieces. Mark and Kathleen began their careers in glass in 1981 and their studio has produced some of the finest examples of stained glass artwork. The Franks are juried members of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

MKFrankGrapes

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Karen Gola

Inspired by art glass, Karen Gola of Gola Glass creates unique kiln formed glassware that ranges from functional to decorative. From her tableware to her delicate seagarden collection, Karen’s work has an ethereal quality, with soft hues and sophisticated textures. Designing each piece individually, Karen’s creative process involves cutting, layering, fusing, grinding, slumping and sandblasting. Each piece is 100% glass with no paint or other materials. Born in North America’s historic center of glassmaking, Pittsburgh, PA, Karen has been long interested in medium. With degrees in Psychology and Civil Engineering from two universities, Karen’s career has ranged from counseling autistic children to managing the construction of interstate bridges. Starting in the 1970's, Karen began pursuing her glass passion making stained glass window hangings and lampshades. After being accepted to the Corning Glass Studio in New York where she worked with several renowned glass artists, Karen became increasingly interested in kiln formed glass. Turning her hobby into a full time profession, Karen is a member of the Maine Craft Association, the Maine Craft Guild and the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. Her work can be found in private collections across the United States, Great Britain, France and Canada.

KGolaBlueRimmedBowl

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Konrad Hunter

Maine artist Konrad Hunter blends traditional and modern materials to create his elegant glass icicle sun catchers. His custom blend of dichroic and transparent glass captures the prism-like quality of a natural icicle. “When I work, I turn out the lights. The glass glows an orange or red when it is hot. Besides being beautiful, it is a great indicator of glass temperature. This in turn informs me on the right moment to make a move. Timing is everything but after the first hour or so it all flows into one long dance. There is a natural elegance to the entire process.” Konrad began working with hot glass after attending Penland School of Craft in 2000. He spent several years perfecting his craft before moving to Northern California where he worked as an assistant glass caster. After graduating with a degree in mathematics from Humboldt State University, Konrad moved back to Maine where he continues to work as an independent artist. When not glass blowing Konrad can be found exploring Baxter State Park or Acadia , for which he designs his own camping equipment.

KHunterOrnaments

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Alex Kalish

Born and raised in New York City, Alex was introduced to hot glass in 1985 and it was love at first sight. Alex began blowing glass as a student at Franklin Pierce College. After graduation, Alex worked for a New Hampshire glass blower where he began developing his own designs. Eventually Alex built his studio and his glass blowing equipment. He created unique glass designs including his popular stemware and vases, ornaments, and one-of-a-kind jewelry. Alex’s work over the years has grown to include home lighting and collaborative sculptural installations. All pieces are hand blown without the use of a mold. Each piece is individual and unique. No two pieces are ever the same. Alex is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

AKalishChampagneGlass

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Jordana Korsen

Jordana Korsen creates beautiful and unique hand blown glass with clean lines that is both functional and sculptural. While incorporating her sense of humor in her work, the glass pieces are still polished, controlled, and technically sound. Her brilliant vases, pitchers, plates, bowls, paperweights and ball ornaments reflect her personality which she describes as “spontaneous, whimsical and free.” Jordana uses the rich history of blown glass as well as her own experiences for inspiration. The precision of Italian glass making remains an influence; however, when energized by the creative possibilities in the studio, she feels anything can be accomplished. Jordana studied fine arts at Franklin Pierce College and with production glass artists at Corning, Haystack and Penland School of Crafts. She is currently the head of the glass program at Franklin Pierce College. Jordana is a member of the League of New Hampshire and League of American Craftsmen.

JKorsenGoblets

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Cheddy Moller

Cheddy Moller’s beautifully stained glass features landscapes, flowers, waterfowl and other New England birds in her unique three-dimensional designs and glowing colors. Cheddy’s exquisite designs and fine craftsmanship result in heirloom quality stained glass that will bring decades of enjoyment to its owner. Creating with glass is a long process. The glass is carefully chosen for each composition according to texture, color and opaqueness. Three patterns are made and then the glass is cut piece by piece with cutters and grozing pliers. The pieces are sanded, wrapped in copper tape and fitted back on the pattern. The work is then brushed with flux and soldered together, which is an art in itself! After cleaning, patina is applied to the solder in the final step. Cheddy always loved making things “pleasing, colorful and different.” As a child she studied oil painting and composition. As an adult, designing clothing was her priority. Motivated by the desire to have a stained glass lamp over the dining area table in their new log home, Cheddy enrolled in an adult education course to learn the basic skills of stained glass. By the end of the course, Cheddy had a new lamp and was “totally hooked” on her new hobby. After over 30 years, Cheddy still enjoys creating new deigns as well as the physical work this entails. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Cheddy’s work can be found in galleries across New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine.

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Hope Murphy

Hope Murphy is a fused glass artist specializing in lighting. Although her background is in carpentry and cabinetry, in recent years Hope has been drawn to fused glass. Preferring to make functional work including, but not limited to: ceiling lights, tiles and nightlights, every piece Hope creates is a unique work of art. Using a kiln to fire her glass at high temperatures to form a base to apply a variety of naturalistic images, Hope allows the glass to cool before cleaning and prepping the surface for an image transfer. Printing the images on a high iron oxide transfer paper, she then carefully cuts and layers each part of the image to fit onto the glass. There is a three-fire process the glass goes through before the image is successfully fused onto the glass. Living in southern Maine with her husband, son and yellow Lab, Hope is a member of the Maine Crafts Association and League of NH Craftsmen. Her work can be found in fine craft galleries and shows throughout Maine and New Hampshire.

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Eve Passeltiner

Eve Passeltiner has been traveling since she was three weeks old, making and selling art since she was six years old, and studying science since she was ten. First introduced to stained glass while she was the founding director of The Moab Arts & Recreation Center in Utah, it wasn’t until Eve visited Bermuda that she discovered kiln-formed glass. Inspired by the vibrant landscape of Utah, Eve strives to capture that subtle dynamic in her glass art. Her childhood in New York City, travels around the world, and fascination with Native American arts have also influenced her designs. Eve has taken classes with master glass artists at The Studio at The Corning Museum of Glass and at Worcester Center for Craft. In addition, she studied sculpture at The Arts Students League of New York, ceramics at the Hui No’eau Visual Arts Center in Maui and textile arts with many individual artisans.

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Michael Trimpol

Michael Trimpol of Little River Hot Glass began his career as a glassblower in 1983 at the Sheridan College School of Craft and Design in Mississauga, Ontario. From his studio in the mountains of Vermont, he has continued to refine his skills by creating beautiful blown glass and participating and hosting glass workshops with leading glass artist from around the world. According to Michael, “I have a strong preference for objects of a personal scale and with potential utility. A vessel with a lid or stopper has always been of most interest. Color and pattern are also important, either a single pure color highlighting form or a more complex mixture to create patterns. I am proud of the final product but the actual process of creation is what I find most satisfying.”

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Caterina Urrata

Passionate about glassmaking, Caterina Urrata and David Weintraub of Fiamma Art Glass create a wide variety of work that range from sculptural to functional. From linear threadlike patterns to dynamic colors and forms, each one their pieces capture the fluidity of molten glass, preserving the fleeting moment. Initially working as professional flameworkers, a technique that involved the manipulation of glass through the use of a torch, the pair branched out into glass blowing, casting and other traditional processes. This is reflected in work that is often technically complex while still aiming for simplicity and elegance in design.

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Peter Vanderlaan

Passionate about glassmaking, Mary Beth Bliss and Peter VanderLaan create a variety of work that ranges from functional to sculptural. Each of their creations, whether it is Mary Beth’s jewelry or Peter’s blown works, convey an appreciation of technique, complexity of color, and a keen eye for the aesthetic. The couple’s earliest work combined Peter’s magnificent blown forms with Mary Beth’s intricately etched glass layers. A vast spectrum of technical and design possibilities were further explored by the duo for both individual and joint work. Mary Beth and Peter began working together over 30 years ago when they designed and built a glass studio and shop in La Cienega, New Mexico. Guadalupe Glass was founded in 1993 where they built a reputation creating incredible works of glass. The couple was drawn to New Hampshire where Mary Beth spent her teenage years farming trees with her parents. Mary Beth and Peter are members of the League of NH Craftsmen.

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Tim Ward

Putting a new spin on an old medium, Tim Ward has developed a new method for using stained glass to portray stunning scenery. Eliminating the lead or copper that is traditionally used to join stained glass pieces together, Tim’s method allows the colors and patterns in the glass to shine, allowing him to achieve a sense of realism often lost in this medium. His production technique is equal parts painting and sculpture. Works are composed of one or more layers of glass pieces that are cut and refined to create a precise fit and then bonded together to a background piece of glass. Tim also makes picture frames and furniture to house each piece. While studying for degrees in science, Tim was also able to learn studio painting techniques in college. He is a self-taught woodworker and furniture builder and was introduced to classical stained glass techniques by a friend. His unique methods of glass work evolved over time as he increasingly sought to improve the representational qualities of stained glass. His love of the natural world led him to wildlife art. His love for the workshop led him to design and create furniture and picture frames.

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David Weintraub

Passionate about glassmaking, Caterina Urrata and David Weintraub of Fiamma Art Glass create a wide variety of work that range from sculptural to functional. From linear threadlike patterns to dynamic colors and forms, each one their pieces capture the fluidity of molten glass, preserving the fleeting moment. Initially working as professional flameworkers, a technique that involved the manipulation of glass through the use of a torch, the pair branched out into glass blowing, casting and other traditional processes. This is reflected in work that is often technically complex while still aiming for simplicity and elegance in design.

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Wood

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David Beffa-Negrini

Creating fine wooden jigsaw puzzles, David's work is skillfully crafted on a scroll saw with a very thin jigsaw blade. Custom cut by hand, each jigsaw puzzle is a unique work of art. Continuing the time-honored tradition of puzzle making, David uses a special blend of basswood backed by a double-thick layer of mahogany veneer. Incorporating a variety of techniques to challenge puzzlers including false edges, drop-outs and cutting along the color lines, each puzzle contains David's signature "jester" piece that is often a reflection of the overall design. After cutting the puzzle, David carefully hand-oils, waxes and polishes each piece for a flawless finish. An avid puzzle collector, David noted that there was no comparison between the qualities of his antique wooden jigsaw puzzles to the contemporary cardboard variety. In 1997, David founded Fool's Gold Puzzles where he could uphold the tradition of hand-cut wooden jigsaw puzzles. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, David is also the editor (and past president) of the Association of Game & Puzzle Collectors.

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Donald Briere

Using domestic and exotic hardwoods along with semi-precious stones, Donald Briere creates segmented woodturnings that range from just a couple of pieces to those with thousands of individual elements. Donald’s preferred woodworking method, called segmented turning, involves gluing together various blocks of wood or semi precious stones to produce patterns, then putting the glued work on a lathe to contour the edges and produce a smooth finished product. A meticulous process, Donald must ensure that there are no gaps between the individual segments of wood. The finished result is a piece rich with color and pattern. Woodturning is Donald’s passion, he has said, “Watching the piece come alive in the final turning stages is breathtaking to me.” Having created unique designs for well over 15 years, in 2009 Donald’s efforts paid off when he won “Best in Show” in the “Living With Crafts" exhibit at the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen's annual Fair. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Donald’s work can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Corwin Butterworth

Corwin Butterworth expertly crafts fine furniture and home accessories primarily from North American hardwoods, cherry, walnut and maple. Using a combination of century’s old hand techniques and modern machinery, Corwin’s work is a seamless blend of timeless elegance with contemporary appeal. Initially a studio art major, Corwin fell in love with woodworking after taking a summer class at the Rhode Island School of Design. After an apprenticeship with his instructor and an intensive twelve-week course at the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Rockport, Maine, Corwin felt motivated to start pursuing woodworking full time. His work can now be found in galleries and homes throughout New England.

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Rick Carlson

Rick Carlson creates stunning pens and shaving kits out of wood and acrylic. All of Rick’s work is handcrafted on a lathe. Transforming a rectangular block of wood or acrylic into an elegant finished piece is a time consuming and delicate process. Turning each piece individually, Rick slowly whittles away the wood until the desired thickness and shape is achieved. The turned piece is then sanded smooth with progressively finer abrasives. To protect the surface of his turned work, Rick applies a high-gloss finish that gives the piece an elegant and sophisticated feel. Like all good works of art, no two pieces are alike.

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Noah Cote

Wood worker, Noah Cote creates stunning turned pens, envelope openers, key chains and more out of beautiful maple wood. The wood, taken from a diseased and dying century-old sugar Maple tree that stood in front of the Robert Frost farm in Derry, NH, was thought to be the inspiration for Frost’s poem, “Tree at my Window.” Noah has been lucky enough to be issued some of this precious wood for use in his work. Using a lathe, every one of Noah’s pieces is meticulously hand-turned. He then uses a clear finish/oil on most of his pieces to enhance the natural beauty of the wood. Noah’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts and the Robert Frost Farm gift shop.

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Jack Curran

Jack Curran of Paddock Way expertly crafts treasure boxes in different combinations of native and exotic woods including: Bubinga, Cherry, Padauk, Sapele, Walnut, Curly Maple and more. All of his boxes consist of a primary wood (which comprises the bulk of the box) and an accent wood. Inspired by the Arts & Crafts movement, much of Jack’s work reflects simple, yet graceful forms and attention to detail. Having spent 30 years designing beautiful custom furniture, Jack believes his work is as much about the creative process as it is about the resulting product. Striving to achieve quality, Jack’s beautiful boxes and custom furniture not only reflect his artisanal skills, but are also unique pieces of functional art. His work can be found in fine crafts shows, galleries and private collections throughout the country.

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Scott & Ian Duffy

Scott and Ian Duffy’s family business, Rockledge Farm Woodworks, creates individually hand crafted fine furniture and home accessories primarily from native Vermont hardwoods. At Rockledge Farm it’s all about the wood. Most of their work is made wholly or in part using “figured” hardwoods such as Birdseye and Curly Maple, Black Walnut, Cherry, Flame Birch, and Burls which are all locally grown and sustainably harvested. “We believe the most beautiful wood furniture and gifts are those in harmony with nature.” The pair have an extensive line of home accessories and unique gifts including single plank cutting and serving boards, a full line of cherry serving pieces, handsome chess boards and chess pieces, boxes, bowls, lamps and much more. The Duffy family has a heritage of woodworking at Rockledge Farm in Weathersfield, Vermont. Four generations ago they operated a mail order business involving wood furniture. Today Rockledge Farm is a small, family operated business located on their 200 year old “hill farm”. Although barns have been converted for their wood working business, they still have livestock on the farm! One of their barns is a storehouse of rare pieces of wood. A piece may sit for years until it “speaks” to them, and “the proper use for that wood becomes apparent.” Rockledge Farm Woodworks’ finely crafted products may be seen in their Gallery and in select galleries around the nation.

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Tim Elliott

Tim Elliott, a wood turner, has been turning wood for over 25 years. He skillfully turns distinctive vases and bowls and is well known for his hollow-form work, which is often decorated with chip-carved designs. Tim’s shapes are innovative yet graceful, often providing a pleasant surprise with an unique contemporary design. Whether carved from a single piece of wood, such as curly maple, black walnut, mahogany, or Russian olive, or from a combination of woods, all of Tim’s beautiful forms compliment the natural features of the wood. Tim’s work has appeared in regional and national shows and he has published articles on wood turning projects in the United States and abroad. Tim also demonstrates turning and chip carving throughout New England.

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Robert Englund

Dr. Robert Englund, Internist and Woodturner, has been turning wood on his lathe for more than twenty-five years. At first, he made pieces as time allowed. Now that he is retired from his medical practice, he is able to spend more time at his craft. Robert turns wood into lamps, bowls, and hollow vessels. His lamps are designed so that bark and the split surfaces from the woodsplitter are included in the base. The bowls are designed to highlight the natural edge of the bark. Robert likes to show the interface between the heartwood and sapwood, unique grain patterns in the wood, bark inclusions, and segments of arrested decay. Robert is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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William Frost

William “Bill” Frost has specialized in lathe-turned objects of exceptional quality for functional use or decorative display. He works in a broad range of foreign and domestic hardwoods with unusual grain patterns and colors. Most of what Bill creates is one-of-a-kind pieces for discriminating buyers and collectors. Bill’s work has been shown in invitational and juried exhibitions across the country and several of his pieces are in permanent collections. In 2003, trustees of the Robert Frost farm in Derry, NH cut down a diseased and dying century-old sugar Maple tree. Some of the wood has been issued to Bill, 4th cousin of Robert Frost. Bill has been creatively turning his half dozen 6-foot long slabs of maple into highly collectible and treasured pieces. Bill, a retired engineer, has been a member of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers and is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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Frye Measure Mill

Now an historic landmark recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Frye's Measure Mill has been water powered since the 1850's. Some of the Mill's first products — including round and oval pantry boxes, measures, and piggins — are still being produced on much of the original water powered machinery. Examples of Frye's oldest woodenware can be found in museums throughout the country. Many years ago, at the request of the Canterbury, New Hampshire Shakers, shaker box reproductions were added to our collection. Because of the same dedication to excellence in quality and craftsmanship today, as in the past, Frye boxes remain sought after by collectors across the country. Striving for the "urge for perfection", Frye's Measure Mill follows documented Shaker traditions as outlined by historians Edward and Faith Andrews to painstakingly create Shaker boxes with native maple, hand bent around wooden shaping molds, and fastened with copper tacks.

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Jack Graceffa

Exotic wood craftsman Jack Graceffa creates a variety of exquisitely turned wooden objects including lidded vessels, segmented vases, ikebanas, jewelry boxes, pepper mills and more! After retiring from his dental practice, Jack soon became busy in his workshop after trying woodturning, Jack was immediately hooked as he has always been a manually inclined person. The comparison of woodturning to dentistry is not much of a stretch as many of the elements are similar, i.e. cutting, contouring, shaping, smoothing and polishing. Truly a labor of love for a retired dentist, Jack is now a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. His work can be found in fine craft galleries across the state.

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Ken Griffith

Intrigued by the enduring dedication and strong work ethic of the Shakers, Ken Griffith of “All Things Shaker” creates elegant Shaker Boxes, trays and carriers. Embracing the centuries-old craft, Ken uses various woods including bird's-eye maple, walnut or cherry to create his shaker-inspired work. Using hot water to soften a band of wood, Ken forms the traditional tail shapes on the end of the piece. Finding the wood has it’s own flaws and personality, Ken meticulously molds the water-softened band into the desired shape. He is careful not to rush this process as any haste could result in splitting the wood and ruining the box. Finishing touches are applied, including drilling and tacking the ends of the wooden band together to form the box shape. Using wooden forms to allow the piece to retain its form, Ken then leaves his creation to air-dry overnight. Initially pursuing a career in high-tech finance, earning a Master’s degree while steadily climbing the proverbial corporate ladder, Ken eventually became dissatisfied. Having a passion for woodworking, it was the simple Christmas gift of a father-son Shaker box class from his wife that completely redirected his path. Reigniting a long lost desire to work with wood, Ken left the hustle of the corporate world and began pursuing his craft full time. Forming “All Things Shaker” in 2012, Ken’s work can be found at trade shows all over the Northeast and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Thomas Hall

Working with a vast array of woods and other exciting materials, Thomas Hall creates stunning contemporary furniture that echoes the graceful elegance of the craftsmen period. The design process of turning ideas into a finished piece is very satisfying for Thomas. Whether working with a prospective client or on his own design, Thomas finds it prudent to build a full-scale model out of cardboard or MDF. Thomas designs his furniture using design elements found in other craftsmen pieces. Individually picking elements out of his vast collection of books and periodicals in his home library, Thomas can adapt current pieces to include any new inspirations or create a whole new piece to suit his overall design. Thomas pays particular attention to the quality of the finished piece. Feeling that not only is the design important, but also the piece’s overall construction, Thomas handcrafts his furniture with expert precision and care. His work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

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John Harris

John Harris began carving 30 years ago making working decoys from cork bodies and pine heads. He took several classes with Steve Brittel, a well-known waterfowl carver. The focus of these classes was on how to shape birds and complete the piece in a few days. Upon retiring as a high school teacher, John and his wife moved to Florida. He was able to devote more time to carving and exhibit his work. Initially, John carved decoys but has since expanded to shore birds, song birds and a few raptors. John carves with tupelo, and in the final stages of carving, diamond bits and a burning tool are used to texture the piece before painting it with acrylics. John is always on the lookout for driftwood as a setting for the pieces; most are found on fishing trips to northern Maine lakes. The lure of New England charm, children and grandchildren drew John and his wife back to their home in Kittery, Maine.

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Ian Johnson

Blurring the lines between art and craft, Ian creates precision woodwork including gear mechanisms, jewelry and small desk boxes, cutting boards and larger furniture items. Creating precise, well-constructed pieces inspired by early American furniture, Ian’s work is not only a craft due to its functional nature, but embodies meticulous attention to design, form and surface pattern. From his fine chests to his mechanical gears inspired to promote a fuller understanding of simple and complex machines, Ian’s work captures the visual complexity of movement while emphasizing the natural beauty of wood. Originally from Liverpool, England, Ian began working at Rolls-Royce where he endured a rigorous six year apprenticeship, working his way from the machine shop to the design office by earning an engineering degree. Having both a background in engineering and master craftsmanship, Ian began working in wood to make heirloom quality toys for his children. In 1995, he moved to Antrim, New Hampshire and formed Cogworks to expand his craft. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen, Ian’s beautiful woodwork can be found in galleries throughout the state.

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Rob Jones

Rob Jones is a Master Woodcarver who’s delicately crafted bowls, candle holders and other wooden marvels defy the conventional laws of craftsmanship. Impossible to make with a traditional lathe, Rob constructs each one of his unique pieces with a laser-cutting machine out of a single piece of Baltic birch plywood. He then carefully stacks each slice by hand, rotating the layers slightly to create an array of dazzling designs. Growing up in Lincolnville, Maine, Rob later joined the Navy as an Electronics Technician. Hoping to go to art school, he made several attempts at being an illustrator. Frustrated, he later returned to Maine as an electrician. In 2001, Rob began woodcarving, refining his skills as the years progressed with no formal education. This real world experience has lent itself to Rob’s innovative work.

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Ken Long

Intrigued with creating works of art with practical appeal, Ken Long creates a variety of turned pieces – platters, wine glasses, ornaments, and urns. Each piece of wood is selected for grain and color. Ken uses a lathe and turning tools to shape each piece, highlighting the inherent beauty of the wood. Ken draws inspiration from Shaker and Japanese woodworking, medieval European woodturnings, and pottery. Starting his career as a draftsman, Ken went on to create sound boards for concert grand pianos, eventually going back to school to become an EMT and then a Paramedic. Having first taken up woodturning as a means to make a Christmas ornament, Ken’s work has evolved, becoming more refined and elegant. With a focus on “living with wood,” Ken turns the medium into functional works of art.

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John McAlevey

John McAlevey’s furniture designs have evolved over the years into his personal and individual architectural style with clean graceful lines and broad appeal. He uses mostly domestic hardwoods, such as cherry, maple and walnut, and traditional joinery in the construction of his furniture. Mortise-and-tension joints are used where applicable, drawers are made with hand-cut dovetails and all the surfaces are scraped and hand-sanded. John uses a variety of finishes, but prefers a penetrating oil/varnish finish that allows the wood to obtain a deep natural color over a period of time. Recently John became interested in turning bowls on a lathe using solid pieces of green unseasoned wood from the New England forest, including cherry, maple, curly maple, ash and walnut. As the bowls dry they warp or distort slightly out of round, giving them a distinctive shape. Some of John’s bowls have a band of decorative carving. A few of these are milk painted in colors that compliment the natural wood tones. In 1962, John began to pursue the craft of woodworking and furniture design after seeing an exhibit featuring the work of contemporary craftsmen. He subsequently visited the workshops of these woodworkers and eventually worked in two of their shops. In 1965, John moved to Henniker, NH and became established woodworker designing and making furniture. He has been a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen since 1965 and was a founding member of the guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers. In 1993, John moved his home and workshop to mid-coast Maine where he continues to design and craft beautiful furniture, including custom woodworking.

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Richard Morgan

Richard Morgan of The Painted Bird creates one-of-a-kind carved wooden shore birds that are patterned after authentic early American hunting decoys. Handmade from native woods and hand painted to resemble the aged patina of the antique decoys Richard gets his inspiration from, no two birds are alike. Always having a keen interest in the arts, Richard who was born in Conneticut, spent a good part of his childhood in the southwest where he was exposed to a variety of art classes. After returning to New England to attend The University of Hartford Art School, where he majored in wood sculpture, Richard went on to work in antiques restoration. After a request to make several copies of an old waterlegs bird carving, Richard went on to create dozens of skillfully crafted bird decoys. His work has been featured in several decorating magazines, books and on the cover of an LL Bean catalog. A natural expression of his reverence for wood and form, Richard’s work also echoes his appreciation for the craftsmanship of the past.

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MysticWoodworks

Mystic Woodworks

Ray and Jamie Doubleday of Mystic Woodworks create functional wood products, each with a unique identity. Finding inspiration in where they live and the medium itself, Ray & Jamie’s work is often a direct reflection of nature — such as in their many leaf shaped boards. Other designs are a celebration of the wood itself as many of their designs highlight the natural colors of the varying woods. According to the artists, “the white of maple is striking in itself but when it is placed next to a piece of black walnut the combination becomes synergistic. Add the bright red of padauk, the golden tones of ash and oak with the earth tone of cherry and we have an explosion of beauty.” Celebrating 24 years of crafting high quality woodenware in beautiful mid coast Maine, Ray and Jamie are constantly surrounded by “spectacular natural beauty.” As an engineer, Ray is constantly looking for ways to improve their manufacturing process. Although the wood itself is a renewable resource, they don’t take their beloved medium for granted and try to maximize the use of the wood they acquire. “In everything we do we feel that it is nature, not we who is the artist.”

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Matthew Newton

Matthew "Matt" Newton of Fig Newton Wood Creations makes beautiful hand turned wooden bowls out of salvaged wood from fallen trees or those removed by lumber services. All of Matt’s bowls start their life as a raw, green log. Matt then cuts the log into segments with a chainsaw and mounts them on a lathe. After each piece is turned to a rough shape on the lathe, Matt sets them aside to dry. After about four to six months drying, Matt remounts each piece to finish turning. The lathe helps reveal each pieces own inner beauty and no two are alike as, according to Matt, “each tree has its own story to tell.” Having been woodworking for a number of years, Matt started out by making bookshelves and “watching every episode of the New Yankee Workshop.” Taking a course with Mike Dunbar at the Windsor Chair Institute peaked Matt’s interest in the medium and led him to the wonderful world of woodturning. After taking a class on making Windsor candle stands at Woodcraft, Matt began making these for friends and family. This eventually led him to try turning bowls. From then on, he was hooked, describing the process of seeing a bowl emerge from a plain log as “magic.” Working from his home studio in Hampton, NH, Matt’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Laury Nichols

Fashioning whimsical woodland animals and other custom sculptures, Laury Nichols truly enjoys the woodcarving process. A self-taught artist, Laury transforms ordinary blocks of wood into unique characters full of humor and personality. Laury prefers working with Northern white pine, basswood and occasionally cedar. Although wood carvers prefer using basswood due to its consistency and tight grain, Laury finds herself drawn to pine because it has greater variety and character. She also enjoys the sound and vibration of her tools make while carving into the wood. Because pine is more unpredictable and chip-out prone, Laury exercises extreme caution while carving fine details. After carefully carving each piece, Laury uses wood burning techniques to outline the carving before applying a base coat of colors. She then uses a variety of inks, paints, colored pencils and a final layer of clear nail polish to finish each piece. The multiple layers of color often give a raised look to Laury’s carvings. Carving for over 35 years, Laury sketches lots of ideas before choosing the best ones to develop. Relying a lot on her imagination, Laury is also inspired by classic children’s novels including, “The Wind in the Willows.” A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Laury has won several awards for her work. Her unique characters can be found in several galleries throughout the state.

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Wayne Noel

Wayne Noel is a custom woodworker with over 30 years’ experience in the craft. Using the traditional Shaker style and concept of utility as his backdrop, he adds unique accents to create individualized pieces that are both beautiful and functional. Wayne incorporates a combination of native New England hardwoods, such as oak, maple, cherry and ash, into his work. Conscious of the finite nature of such resources, Wayne repurposes smaller pieces of wood by incorporating them into the inlay of different, larger pieces. In this way, he works to maintain the sustainability of his craft while creating finished products that are as distinctive as the people who enjoy them.

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Joel Paul

Joel Paul of 13 Stars Design creates elegant shaker style furniture and other handcrafted items including cutting boards, tools and keepsake boxes. Using the natural properties of the wood to create timeless and harmonious, heirloom treasures, Joel takes comfort in knowing that he can create items that will stand the test of time. Inspired by Shaker furniture, Joel’s work echoes it’s simple, yet timeless design. Much of his work highlights the natural color and texture of the wood itself. Often astounded by the amount of workable material wasted during home renovations, Joel’s company prides itself on utilizing reclaimed materials. Working not only with local antique wood dealers to obtain rare woods such as chestnut, Joel also creates pieces made from local wood. This attention to design and materials results in some truly stunning pieces. Working out of his Salmon Falls studio, Joel’s work can be found at fine craft shows around the state and Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Susan Ratnoff

Working almost exclusively in hardwoods including: cherry, oak, maple, tiger maple, paduk, wenge and black walnut, Susan Ratnoff of Taking Shape Designs creates stunning fine furniture and home accessories. Inspiration for each of Susan’s individually handcrafted pieces comes from the very woods itself. Strongly influenced by the Shaker, Mission and Arts and Crafts movements, Susan combines the geometric aspects of those styles using contrasting woods that not only compliment the timber’s natural features, but accentuate them. Although Susan often uses clear finishes/oils on cherry, walnut and maple to enhance the wood's natural beauty, she will stain or paint other woods to provide a greater variety of color combinations and designs. A retired school administrator, Susan has been crafting woodworks for over 30 years. Although she thoroughly enjoyed working with friends on woodworking projects both large and small (homebuilding and finish carpentry under the guidance of a master craftsman teacher), she knew that pursuing a career in education would be equally satisfying and more practical. When she officially retired in 2008, Susan created Taking Shape Designs to allow her earlier training and passion for woodworking to blossom. Initially working solely on commissioned based projects, Susan has expanded her work to include one-of-a-kind cutting/serving boards, lazy Susans, mirrors, tables and a variety of other woodcrafts.

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Deanne Sanville

Drawing from traditional techniques, yet still incorporating her own unique features, Deanne Sanville of the Lilac Dragonfly creates stunning hand woven baskets. Incorporating hardwood bases inside the basket and runners on the bottom, Deanne uses fine hardwoods for the handles and lids. Rather than work with a mold, Deanne free-weaves her baskets, using an Indian cross-stitch, instead of staples or nails, to bind the rim. She then finishes each basket with brass tacks and rivets, and incorporates harness leather in some designs like her Lidded Baskets. Finally, Deanne rubs each basket with non-toxic lemon-bean oil that enhances the subtleties of the wood and allows the baskets to be food-safe.

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Gary Starr

Gary Starr turns Vermont basswood into a variety of birds and fish ranging from miniature bird ornaments to full-sized standing sculptures. Gary’s process begins by studying the bird or fish he’s planning. He draws preliminary sketches, often from photos, before he hand carves and paints each of his authentic creations. Gary’s exquisite decoys represent a large variety of birds such as ducks, loons, nuthatches, snow geese and sand pipers. He’s added game fish to his collection, including salmon, trout and bass. Gary’s style captures the simplicity in form of the “old decoy tradition” while incorporating observations of the birds and fish in nature. His wooden bird ornament selection of several different species has become a collector’s item throughout the country. Each of the carvings is created and signed by Gary in his Weybridge, Vermont studio. Gary grew up in a home that had over 2,000 decoys! In 1956, at 9 years old, Gary carved his first black duck with his father, Dr. George Ross Starr of Duxbury, MA. (who later wrote two books on carving and decoys.) Gary developed his skill largely at his father’s side. A graduate of Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration, Gary spent the first part of his adult life in the hotel and food services industry before becoming a full-time artist. It became important to him to reconnect with his family heritage. In 1986, Gary started his successful one-man company, “Starr Decoys.”

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David Taylor

David Taylor creates turned bowls, segmented wooden vases, wine stoppers, key chains and more from local hardwoods, including maple, cherry and ash. All of David’s bowls are turned in a variety of shapes and sizes and can be used in the kitchen or for display. His segmented vases, wine stoppers, pendants, key chains and more are created with a variety of woods for both everyday use and aesthetic appeal. Every one of David’s pieces are one-of-a-kind, signed by the artist and sealed with either a food-safe beeswax or clear finish/oil to accentuate the wood’s natural beauty. Working from his home studio in Kingston, NH, David’s work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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William Taylor

Designing beautiful jewelry boxes in a stunning array of styles, William Taylor enjoys featuring the wood's grain. Preferring highly figured woods with prominent natural features, each one of William’s meticulously designed boxes are solid wood, environmentally friendly and built to be passed on to other generations. Having grown up a farm boy in Illinois, William served aboard the USS Boston then went back to school and was hired as an engineer. He found his calling in X-Ray medical systems and spent 40 years in New England hospitals installing and servicing those systems. Believing that building things is in his DNA, after retiring, William found woodworking satisfied his need to create. A member of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers as well as the League New Hampshire Craftsmen, William’s jewelry boxes can be found in fine craft galleries across the state.

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Horace Varnum

Horace Varnum of Artasia produces intricate, handmade, fretwork wooden ornaments. Spending his time in the woodshop doing all the wood preparation, cutting and finishing, his wife Noella, the other half of the Artasia team, oversees the inventory, packaging and shipping. Cut on a scroll saw, Horace makes all his ornaments from New England rock maple. Once the wood has been selected and prepared to size, Horace glues the pattern to the face of the wood. He drills small pilot holes through specific locations where cuts are to be made. For each cut, Horace must painstakingly thread the saw blade through the pilot hole, reattaching it to the scroll saw arm and setting the blade tension. This step is repeated for each cut. The ornament is then carefully sanded, finished with a clear sealer and initialed by the Horace. Since 1993, Artasia has produced thousands of handcrafted clocks, wall hangings and fretwork gift items. During the mid 1990's, Artasia's line of fretwork Christmas tree ornaments grew in popularity and demand and by 1998 it was necessary to focus attention almost exclusively on its growing collection of rock maple ornaments. Now, with over 500 designs to choose from, Artasia offers one of the finest lines of hand cut fretwork ornaments available.

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T. Breeze Verdant

Creating beautiful designs with woods, Paua abalone and fine metals, T. Breeze Verdant’s work echoes the natural landscape with compelling colors and patterns. A self-taught marquetry artist, T. Breeze (the “T” stands for Tom) uses very thin veneers, creating elaborate images and landscapes on boxes, guitars, jewelry and small tabletops. Not one to continue producing the same item over and over again, T. Breeze works in cycles, with his designs constantly evolving. Marquetry is the art of applying pieces of veneer to a surface to form decorative patterns, designs or pictures. This process allows T. Breeze to work with rare woods without using much. "Little material travels through my studio doors," he says. "I like to work with veneers because there's no sawdust, no waste. They're sliced, not sawn. A piece of wood 1” thick produces 40 slices of veneer. I can create the greatest amount of beauty from the least amount of wood." T. Breeze’s aim has always been to create and share the beauty of wood while consuming very little of it. He started his woodworking experience by building a log cabin from his own trees and rocks and even built a second home using only materials from demolished buildings. This sentiment is carried on with T. Breeze’s art today as much of his work is made from scavenged and recycled woods. A jack of many trades, T. Breeze has been a full-time marquetry artist since 1988. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, his work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the country.

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Fiber
Nancy Adams

Creating unique scarves, handbags and other fashion accessories, Nancy Adams of Studio 25 also designs stunning mixed media encaustic work. Inspired by the limitless opportunities nature offers to explore color, texture and form, Nancy’s work contains original photographs that are digitally rendered into unique geometric patterns. Each image is then disperse-dyed onto white fabric, reflecting the beautiful natural colors of the original snapshot. Recently, Nancy also began creating encaustic works that combine hand-dyed fabrics and original photographic images with hot beeswax or resin. Nancy applies each image by either burnishing them off of laser-printed paper or by embedding printed tissue into the encaustic surface. She then uses additional wax to ensure every finished piece retains a luminescent quality. Having come from a long line of New England crafters, Nancy developed a strong appreciation for functional art. Inspired by fabrics after learning to sew in Junior High School, Nancy began creating traditional needlecraft work. Over the years, her fabric art evolved and Nancy started experimenting with dyeing techniques, free-hand quilting and computer-generated textile imagery. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsman, Nancy also holds a B.S. in Plant Science and a M.S. in Horticulture. Combining her love of crafts with her love of nature, Nancy’s work not only enhances one’s beauty but also reflects the natural splendor that surrounds us.

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Antrim Street Studio

Creating appealing Shibori scarves, Amy Meltzer of Antrim Street Studio has loved making things with her hands for as long as she can remember. Inspired by many things, the natural world, contemporary and indigenous art, and by architectural forms, Amy also finds creative inspiration listening to music. All Antrim Street Studio fabric is hand dyed 100% silk. Amy begins the dye process using powdered dyes in primary colors, enabling her to mix a vast array of colors. She creates patterns in the silk by using mechanical resist techniques, which involve shaping and compressing the fabric before submerging it in a liquid dye bath, so portions of it resist the dye. Each piece emerges from the dye bath with unique variations in color and texture. After unwrapping the silk, Amy washes out the excess dye with hot water and dyer’s soap. Often this process pleasantly surprises her as she can see, “how nature has had a hand in creating the results. Each piece is a constant delight.” For a number of years, Amy has worked in mixed media collage and printmaking, but was always drawn to working with textiles. After falling in love with the process of creating color on cloth at a fabric-dyeing workshop, Amy began dyeing cotton to use in quilts. When she discovered the Shibori techniques, Amy finally decided to try those methods on silk, and soon after, started Antrim Street Studio, in 2007. Her work can be found in galleries and shows throughout New England.

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Kiranada Sterling Benjamin

Kiranada Sterling Benjamin creates exquisite hand-painted silk scarves, scrolls and other extraordinary wall hangings, drawing upon her years of surface design experience in Japan. She skillfully applies traditional Japanese silk dyeing techniques, primarily Rozome, to her original contemporary work. Kiranada is a published author on Rozome, an ancient resist process, wherein she applies dyes over wax in a painterly fashion, resulting in a rich depth of color and patterns. She is known for her fine shaded qualities and masterful over dyeing. Kiranada has won numerous awards worldwide for her surface design on silk. She has exhibited, taught and lectured extensively in Japan as well as in the United States and beyond, as she is keenly interested in promoting the understanding of the history of textile processes and the people who use them.

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Renee Blanchette

Renee Blanchette weaves beautiful scarves and shawls in luxurious chenille, rayon, cotton and metallic yarns. Renee is as passionate about color is she about weaving. Renee works with color intuitively according to the emotions that the color of her yarn evokes in her. Renee’s love of weaving began on a cross-country trip during a college summer break when she fell in love with Navajo weavings. Some time late she was introduced to New Hampshire’s Harrisville Designs where she took a class in Navajo weaving with Tom Jipson. “The moment I touched the loom I knew I had found my life’s passion.” Renee has been weaving for 33 years. She now owns a big Swedish counter balance loom and works out of her home studio in New Ipswich, NH. She is a member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and sells her work in select galleries throughout New Hampshire.

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Lucinda Clarke

Lucinda Clarke of Winterworks Silk Scarves makes a variety of colorful silk scarves with different, stenciled shapes. She begins with an untreated white scarf made of satin silk. This silk has one side with a smooth, lustrous satin-like texture and one side that is similar to hobatoi silk. Water and a special (heliographic) light-activated dye is applied to the first side of the scarf. Lucinda’s hand-cut paper stencils are layed onto the dyed scarf and pressed down. Each stencil is individually cut with small scissors. The scarf is then placed under lights to activate the dye. Where there is a shadow cast by the stencil, the dye is not activated, and the designs are revealed. The whole process is repeated on the opposite side. The dye is heat set on each scarf. Lucinda’s technique evolves with each scarf that is made, resulting in the uniqueness of each scarf. The two sides of the same scarf are made somewhat different by varying the stencils as well as the colors from side to side.

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Jodi Clayton

Jodi Clayton of One Lupine Fiber Arts handcrafts gorgeous felt work scarves, wraps, capes and jackets from pure silk chiffon and pure Merino wool. Each piece is made individually with specific attention to design, drape, color and texture. These elegant pieces provide a beautiful fashion accent as well as practical warmth. Jodi’s business, One Lupine Fiber Arts in Bangor, Maine, has grown out of her love for wool and respect for the rich history of textile development and design. Hand felting is an ancient artistic tradition used in every corner of the world to create clothing, fine art, shelter and more. “Working with wool is, by definition, an exercise in sustainability, utility and balance. It is one of the many ways to live artfully in this world.” Jodi’s extensive hand processing ensures the uniqueness of each finished piece of felt work. Her products are comprised entirely of fiber from sheep raised in Maine by growers who value their flocks and rural life in Northern New England. She purchases her wool as raw fleece and hand processes it to create the washed, dyed, combed and spun fiber found in her finished work. Her rich color palette has enticing names such as Aegean, Bay Leaf, Moonlight, Cream Sickle, and Sweet Pea. Her light weight and winter weight scarves are available in many colors. Her “Fusion” Jackets and coats are available select stunning combinations such as “Plum Dragonfly” or “Ebony/Red Chili.” Jodi also creates a wide range of non-apparel felt items including: wall hangings, placemats, table runners, dog beds, juggling balls and felting kits. Felt is not only durable and beautiful, but it also adds a distinctive touch to any space.

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Sarah Drummond

Water, marshlands and mountains are all sources of inspiration for Sarah in the creation of her fabric landscapes. Through her unique layering technique, Sarah is essentially painting with fabric. She starts by laying out fabrics together using the gifts that can be found in the colorful printed pieces. She selects her perfect small swatches from a studio full of printed cottons, batiks, silks and metallic and upholstery fabrics. Sarah uses netting and freeform quilting techniques to add texture and hold the finished piece together. A graduate of UNH with a degree in art with an emphasis on weaving and textiles, Sarah designed fabrics for the garment industry. In her fiber collages, she captures the beauty of the nature surrounding her in an abstract assemblage of color and texture. Each piece is truly unique.

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Erda

Erda leather creates blatant contemporary handbags, totes, satchels and backpacks made from either delicious deerskin or rich chenille fabrics in vibrant colors and earth tones. Each bag is handcrafted with care, hand cut and then sewn from start to finish by the same person. The bags come in a variety of shapes, sizes and patterns. Fun designs conceal the practicalities: all the smaller ones convert to belt bags, many are reversible and most have lots of pockets. The artful embellishments on the leather bags make them even more unique. In addition to their ever-changing selection of standard fabrics, Erda has an enormous array of recycled fabrics. These swatches from high-end fabric mills, often just enough to make one bag. By purchasing one of these recycled fabric bags, the customer not only has a one-of-a-kind, but is also helping the environment! Since 1971, Erda has been making bags of deerskin and other soft leathers in rural central m Maine. Primarily a wholesale company, Erda supplies fine crafts galleries throughout the country.

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Robin Lown Gardella

Robin creates whimsical fabric and clay sculptures that resemble three dimensional paintings. Her fun fantasy creatures include: sparkling seahorses, snazzy snails, fabulous fish, dazzling dragonflies, swinging stars, beautiful bunnies, dashing dogs, a Pegasus and a daredevil Parachuting Turtle. A native of upstate and western New York, Robin appreciates the school system's comprehensive arts program which planted the seeds of her art career. Her family moved to central Maine in the 70's. She continued to take art courses at Springfield College in Massachusetts, where she developed her painting skills. Through her business, Galleria Gardella, Robin continues to paint New England scenes as well as whimsical and imaginative renderings and sculptures.

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Molly Grant

Molly Grant began leatherworking in her early 20's, first by working on her own and then by apprenticing at the Black Swan Leather shop in Portsmouth, NH, where she learned the basic skills of traditional leatherworking. Molly first saw Cordwainer Shoes when she was ten years old at the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen's Fair, known nationally as the oldest craft fair in the nation. She became a juried member in 1989 and participated by showing her line of handbags. There, she had the opportunity to meet Paul Mathews, owner of the Cordwainer Shop. Within a few months' time Molly was traveling to craft shows nationally with Paul and learning the Cordwainer art. Located on the same property as Wild Orchard Guest Farm, the Cordwainer Shop is a family-run, custom handmade shoe business that was started in the 1930's by the Mathews family. As the wife of second-generation Cordwainer Shop owner Paul Mathews, Molly Grant carries on the business today. Molly travels the country to select juried fine craft shows and still makes handbags, but the main business is footwear and teaching shoemaking workshops at the shop and at craft schools across the country.

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Rosalind Grant

Weaving beautiful and comfy scarves in a multitude of colors and patterns, Rosalind “Roz” Grant has long been surrounded by creativity. Her mother, Deborah Grant, was a potter, juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and an instructor at the New Hampshire Institute of Arts & Sciences ceramics department (now know as the New Hampshire Institute of Art). Her mother’s deep affection for craft and craftsmen alike inspired Roz to create. Using rayon, a versatile fiber that mimics the feel and texture of silk, wool, cotton and linen, Roz’s scarves are truly unique and functional works of art!

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Barbara Herbster

Fascinated by the natural world, Barbara’s hand woven pieces reflect her interest in capturing its infinite color spectrum. Barbara’s newest series further explores this concept, featuring works that echo the vibrant hues of lands Barbara has visited all around the world. Having found weaving an endless outlet for her creativity, Barbara focuses on creating fabrics with a clean, simple appearance. From her hats to her scarves and shawls, each design is asymmetrical while maintaining a sense of balance and intrigue. Earning a B.S. in Education from Montclair State University, Barbara has taught weaving for over 35 years. Having shown her work in galleries throughout New England, Barbara's creations are more than just mere fashion accessories, but wearable works of art.

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Priscilla Hodgkins

Priscilla Hodgkins of Great Island Knitters foisted a lot of ill-fitting sweaters on her family before mastering the art and craft of hand knitting. Her woolen hats, Mobius scarves, and baby sweaters reflect her appreciation for color and fine construction. Having grown up in New Castle and after graduating from the University of New Hampshire, Priscilla moved to New York City where she worked as a medical social worker and then as a commercial producer for live TV spots. She then moved to San Francisco where she worked as a medical secretary for many years, then opened her own computer consulting business and later worked as an IT Manager at a large bank. Around this time Priscilla took up writing. Two years later she moved to Vermont and in 1991 became the Associate Director of the graduate program in creative writing and literature at Bennington College. She is now semi-retired, living once again in her old home town where she is the Town Clerk and Tax Collector and teaches creative writing at the local library. Like her job history, Priscilla’s knitted creations are eclectic, often mixing two or more cultural motifs. Her tams have subtle intricate designs, some of the Mobius scarves resemble fine tweeds and others have bold color stripes. Her skufia hats are inspired by the Eastern Orthodox monks at a monastery where she sang in the choir. Pricilla’s heirloom quality work not only has a wide aesthetic appeal, but are true knitted treasures. Her work can be found at Exeter Fine Crafts.

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Jennifer Kiarsis

Jennifer Kiarsis of Under the Table Rugs creates beautiful hand braided rugs. She uses primarily vintage wool yardage that has been washed, ripped and felted. With an ever-changing collection of wool, every one of Jennifer’s rugs is a unique piece of art. Jennifer loves to work with wool saying, “It has great texture, depth and is naturally water and stain resistant.” Having been braiding for about ten years, Jennifer specializes in area rugs in various shapes for all uses, tablemats, practical pretty baskets and chair pads. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Jennifer’s rugs have been shown in galleries and shows throughout the state.

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Anne Kratz

Anne Kratz creates beautiful braided rugs with a rich and varied palette of colors and fabrics. Braiding together various fabrics that include solid colors, plaids and tweeds, Anne creates unique rugs with depth and texture. Keeping this great tradition alive, braided rugs were a staple in early, Colonial American culture. Settlers used scraps of clothing and other excess materials to make a floor covering that would provide warmth and protection for the home and it’s inhabitants. All of Anne’s rugs are hand-laced in the traditional manner, yet are contemporary in style as many are made with bright, fun colors and interesting visual patterns.

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Jane LaBelle

Creating fiber pins, hats and bags with a funky, yet sophisticated air, Jane LaBelle of Cool Warm Hats work is as fun to wear as it is functional. Jane creates each one of her unique works out of designer fabrics and high quality polar fleece, an innovative fabric that is manufactured from recycled plastic soda bottles. Just think the bottle you throw away today could become a Labelle hat tomorrow! Jane’s work is available in a diverse range of styles, color combinations, fabrics and textures. Many of Jane’s hats are reversible and most are decorated with contrasting trims, buttons, funky ball-fringe or a handmade fiber pin. Made with specific attention to detail, Jane’s eclectic work provides a unique fashion statement, while keeping you cozy and warm! A tenured member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Jane’s colorful hats can be found in fine boutiques nationwide and at juried craft shows.

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Barbara Lally

Barbara Lally of Shibori Bound has immersed herself in many art mediums including but not limited to pysanky (Ukrainian egg decorating), quilting, painting, silk screening, batik, enameling, jewelry and metalsmithing as well as, shibori. All of her artistic experiences have helped influence Barbara’s use of design and color in producing her beautiful shibori scarves. Barbara enjoys working with silk and dye, feeling that the process combines all the other media she has worked on in the past. From metal enameling to pysanky on eggshell, color and texture have always fascinated Barbara. “The soft luxury and the glowing colors of silk shibori make my heart very happy.” Barbara particularly enjoys resist techniques and can be quoted as saying, “I can’t resist any resist techniques!” A long-time member and state juror in the League of New Hampshire Craftsman, Barbara’s work can be found fine craft galleries throughout the state. She has also recieved nationwide recognition for her meticulously detailed, gorgeous eggs, which have been sold in many fine craft galleries and photographed by Yankee Magazine and other publications.

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Betty Lathrop

Betty meticulously hand paints her original designs on silk to create stunning wearable art, wall hangings and silk screens. Betty’s designs, whether realistic or abstract, are inspired by her beautiful gardens and her travels throughout New England. Her vibrant scarves often feature lush flowers with large blossoms that flow over the silk such as poppies, irises, lilies, and tulips. Other favorite motifs reflect her love of the Seacoast such as sailboats, whales and herons. The edges of many of Betty’s pieces are “sculptured” rather than straight as they follow the intriguing shapes of her designs. Originally Betty exclusively painted silk scarves until she began making matching earrings to create boxed “Gift Sets”. Recently she has expanded her work to include multi-layered scarves and three-dimensional wall hangings, each layer of which is painted differently, resulting in elegant one-of a kind signed works of art. Betty’s experience with surface design began in her school years. She taught art in public schools at pre-school through university levels prior to establishing her business, Harborside Fabric Design, 20 years ago. Her work is shown in fine craft shops and fairs throughout New Hampshire and beyond.

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Elizabeth Nordgren

Elizabeth Nordgren creates lovely hand-painted silk scarves that feature fluid florals and abstract designs in a wide array of colors. Elizabeth is also well known as a masterful and innovative weaver. A native of Schenectady, New York, Elizabeth graduated from Syracuse University with a BFA in painting. After working as a commercial artist, Elizabeth moved to New Hampshire and began her fascination with manipulating colored yarns. Most of her current work is done using the painted warp technique, which grew out of her frustration with the limitations of traditional loom weaving. In some of her work, Elizabeth pours textile inks onto a single layer of warp; however, most often the warp is divided into two halves and hand-painted. The two halves are then woven together into a single wall hanging with intriguing textures that is visually mesmerizing. Elizabeth has won numerous awards for her weavings and has exhibited her work in juried craft shows throughout New England and beyond.

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Mary North Phillips

Mary North Phillips, creator of Posh Pockets, works out of her Exeter, New Hampshire studio, creating elegant collections of handbags, with a variety of fabrics and styles, to suit all tastes. Every one of Mary’s limited edition, handcrafted bags are made with high quality fabric or leather personally chosen by the artist herself. Each bag, with sizes ranging from small clutches to large totes, is fully lined and many include hand-made dust bags for storage. With a Master of Fine Arts in Sculpture from the University of Wisconsin, Mary approaches the design of her bags as if she were creating a three-dimensional piece of art. Inspired by volume and form, Mary’s handbags have clean lines that reflect modern, architectural shapes, while maintaining an overall classic appeal. More than an everyday accessory, Mary’s unique handbags are functional works of art.

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Allison Randall

Allison Randall of Friendly Goods has been designing and making her distinctive cloth Soothing Toys for over 35 years. She initially created them for her own children and as gifts for them to give at birthday parties. The creations were enthusiastically received and Allison’s business began as enthusiastic parents wanted to buy the items she made. Much of the cloth Allison uses is recycled or re-used, either from old or cast-off clothing, or given to her by friends or acquaintances who knew Allison liked to sew. Her designs and materials work together to comfort and delight people of all ages, adults and children alike. Believing that it is important to take care of adults much in the same way as children, some of Allison’s toys go to hospice patients or others in distress, to lighten their hearts in difficult times. The feel of the toys, soft and giving, is as important as the design. These toys are not to be put on the shelf and forgotten. They are for holding and squeezing, for hugging and feeling. Allison choose the name, “Friendly Goods,” to express all this and to also pun on the fact that she is a Quaker or “Friend.”

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Wen Redmond

Working from a process that involves an ongoing dialogue between her chosen media, intuition and innovative fiber photography work, Wen creates stunning mixed media fiber art including scarves, encaustic works and her well-known, unique wall pieces. Merging photography, digital printing, collage, surface design and fiber, Wen creates one-of-a-kind works of art. An experienced quilter, Wen’s work is often biographical or journalistic in nature as she works out of insight, inspiration, feeling and reactions to the outer world. She often works in layers, using non-traditional quilting techniques to transform scraps of fiber and photography into contemporary works of art. Wen has created several signature techniques including: Holographic Images, Textured Photographs, Digital Fiber and Serendipity Collage Technique. She delights in creating dialogue, changing perspectives and perceptions of fiber. Lately, she has extended her media to create stunning encaustic works that combine fabrics and original photographic images with hot beeswax and resin. Wen has won numerous awards for her work, recently including: 2nd place at the Infinity Art Gallery, Best in Fiber at the 2012 League of NH Craftsmen, “Living with Crafts” exhibit, “Best in Two Dimensional Design,” at a 2011 League of NH Craftsmen Show and was a Niche finalist three times. A juried member of the League of NH Craftsman for over 20 years, she has authored many articles that have been published in books and magazines, appeared on DVD workshops and been featured on Quilting Arts television. Wen’s work can also be found in galleries, juried and solo art shows, internationally.

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Arlene Simon

Using elegant fabrics in a variety of textures and weights, Arlene Simon of Davina Designs creates beautiful scarves, arm warmers and hats. Each Art-to-Wear hat is hand crafted. The hats are made of unusual fabrics that are visually interesting in colors and textures that coordinate with most winter coats. The inherent properties of each unique fabric determine how the hats will be constructed and whether they are 3-season hats or primarily cold weather wearable. Arlene Simon is a self-taught craftsman with a background in textile design and business. She studied at Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science and New York University Stern School of Business. Previously Arlene designed and manufactured children’s outerwear. Additionally, her background working in architecture lends structural lines and defined shapes to her designs.

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Andrea Williams

Inspired by geometric forms and the use of shadows to create depth and texture, Andrea Williams of Crystal River Weaving designs stunning textiles with dynamic patterns. Enthralled with both the art and science behind the weaving process, Andrea literally paints with fiber to transform an ordinary material into a versatile object of incredible strength, beauty and meaning. Using traditional weaving techniques combined with specialty designer yarns, metallic Lurex and high quality commercial fabric, she carefully laces these materials together using a loom. The final result is as miraculous as it is calculated, a work of art that blends fiber, color, technique and structure. From her table runners and matted textiles to her artisan notecards and gift tags, each piece is unique. A native of Chicago, Andrea had a wide and varied work experience, ranging from being a first-grade teacher to a psychologist, systems analyst and published author. In 1996, she pursued her interest in weaving, attending the Springwater Fiber Studio in Alexandria, VA. In addition to advanced educational degrees from the University of Chicago and University of Maryland, Andrea later earned a degree from the Professional Crafts Program at Haywood Community College in Clyde, NC. Her work has won many awards, including People’s Choice at the NH Weavers Guild 75th Anniversary Show.

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Mixed Media

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Nancy Benjamin

Combining two time-honored crafts — embossing and reverse painting, Nancy Benjamin of Shades of Excellence creates one-of-a-kind lampshades. She begins this process by carving a natural image into vinyl tiles. Once a lampshade form is cut, she then presses the lampshade paper into the hollowed area permanently capturing the design. Using watercolors, Nancy hand paints each embossed design on the reverse side of the lampshade adding color and depth. Using a transparent paper, Nancy lines the inside of the lampshade to protect the design and complete the creation process by assembling the lampshade. Lastly, Nancy frames the lampshade’s top and bottom rim with nature’s art trim and adds her initials as a finishing touch. Once the light, natural or otherwise, shines through, the image is brought to life and can be enjoyed in every season. After 26 years in a corporate environment, Nancy promised herself that she would find a passion centering on her love of nature and interest in arts and crafts. After discovering that lampshade making satisfied part of her need, she experimented with Embossed and Reverse Painting to not only create a unique line of shades, but express her love and appreciation for the New England landscape. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Nancy’s work has been featured in Accent Magazine and NH Magazine. She also created twelve lampshades as a part of the interior design effort for a This Old House project.

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Arra David

Inspired by New England’s beautiful beach stones, Arra David and Anne Johnson of Seastones are longtime New England rock hounds. Creating functional artwork in stone, including stemware, food servers, wine racks, sculptures and more, their love for Mother Nature inspires Arra and Anne to create items that brings the outdoors in. Crafting each piece with attention to detail, quality, and respect for nature, working with stone calls for custom fixtures and techniques. Arra, an engineer and serial inventor, says it's part of his "normal care and feeding" to put him in the workshop and let him make new products and tools. Anne is an artist with a keen eye for balance and harmony. She enjoys combining the endless varieties of nature's materials into pieces that will not only accentuate homes, but keep people connected to their environment. To keep beaches and forests as they are, Anne and Arra "plant" a new quarry stone in the water to replace each one gathered and they plant ten times the number of trees harvested for their work. Based in Windham, NH, Arra and Anne created Seastones in 2003, where they continue to this day blending stone art with the practical ingenuity — a well-known New England trait.

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Deluo Naturals

Curious in what products she could produce from her beekeeper brother's honey and beeswax, Diann Sherbak of Deluo Naturals started making soaps and lotions as a hobby. From this initial success, Diann grew confident in the demand for high quality, handcrafted, all natural bathing products and Deluo Naturals was born. Diann’s approach is quite simple. She hand makes all of her natural soap blends and body care products using only natural ingredients — no artificial coloring, synthetic scents or animal based oils. With the combination of all natural moisturizing oils, butters and essential oils, Diann’s soaps are sure to please the mind, body and spirit.

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Jan Drygulski

Artist Jan Drygulski creates whimsical collage cards that often feature animals or other amusing accents. Using torn bits of various colored papers, Jan skillfully turns the paper scraps into fanciful cats, dogs, bears and other delightful subject matter. The cards are blank on the inside, allowing you to come up with your own personal message. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Jan is also involved with the Newbury Art Association. In addition to teaching workshops in her chosen medium, Jan’s work can be found in fine craft galleries and has been featured in solo exhibitions throughout New England.

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SDuganWeavedBasket

Sharon Dugan

Sharon Dugan creates fine handmade baskets from trees right here in New England. A labor-intensive process, Sharon starts with a log of wood, painstakingly removing the bark, then pounding the length of the log repeatedly to separate the growth rings into long strips. Removing the splint from the log is just the beginning, each piece of the rough “tree run” must be peeled lengthwise one or more times to expose the satin inner face. The back rough side is scraped or sanded smooth and then the splint is slit to the necessary width. Sharon then weaves the splints into the base of a basket that she later mounts to a wooden mold to finish weaving the piece to the desired height. The final steps are to dry the basket, pack down the weavers, weave in a binder, and lastly, fit and lash the appropriate inner rims, outer rims and handle. Having a deep appreciation for nature that developed during her childhood, Sharon learned basket weaving from her mother using dyed reed, grapevine, palm tree racemes and other natural materials. Later becoming a graphic artist, Sharon experimented with photography and needlework, but was always drawn towards wood. After seeing a fine black ash basket at an art show at Plymouth State College, Sharon realized she had found the perfect medium. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Sharon’s work can be found in fine craft galleries throughout the state.

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JEmiloSanta

Julia Emilo

Creating hand painted gourds in a variety of subjects, Julia Emilo stumbled upon the craft while on a trip to New Hampshire. Without any formal training, she began experimenting with the process, taking about a year before she became comfortable drying out the gourds. Emilo's initial creations were all depictions of Santa Claus, as the size of the gourds made them perfect Christmas tree ornaments. As demand for her work grew, so did her product line which now includes: dogs, cats, giraffes, elephants, snowmen, mermaids and various human beings. Julia begins each gourd with the drying process. After each piece has dried, Julia soaks the gourds in warm, soapy water and scrapes them clean. After sanding each gourd smooth, Julia begins decorating them with acrylic paint. She then finishes each piece with butcher's wax, which makes the creation waterproof and shiny. Although she was brought up in a fairly creative environment, Julia never imagined she would become an artist. Working at her family's business, the Waybury Inn, Julia occasionally took on creative projects. After discovering painted gourds, Julia found her niche. Now working exclusively in the medium, her work can be found in galleries throughout Vermont, New Hampshire, Cape Cod and Seattle.

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TEmrickSlateBirdhouse

Terry Emrick

Using recycled slate roof shingles, wood, found objects and copper, Terry creates whimsical sculptures and birdhouses that are not only avian abodes, but beautiful works of art. Terry's enthusiasm for creating is evident in each of his one-of-kind sculptures and birdhouses. Everything is inspirational to Terri and everything he does lends itself to his work. Using salvaged materials Terri transforms the discarded elements into something new and exciting. Inspired to create his unique birdhouses from a left over pile of slate, Terry went through some trial and error before becoming comfortable enough with process that he found it to be fun. A Michigan native, Terry earned his MFA from Michigan State University. Working as both a professor and potter throughout the 70's and 80's, Terry's work evolved, becoming more sculptural in form and post-modern in style. In the 90's, after a brief stint in Florida, Terry settled in Maine where he currently works and resides. His work has been shown all around the country including at the Smithsonian Institute. Individual works of art, Terry's birdhouses stand out from the flock.

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EHopeCollageCard

Elizabeth Hope

Elizabeth Hope of Elizabeth’s Ephemera enjoys creating collages because of the joy they bring. Inspired by the textures in nature and the colors of found objects, Elizabeth likes to accentuate these details in her work. The nubbly arm of a starfish or the orange of a butterfly’s wing can be the foundation for one of her collages. Elizabeth enjoys playing with proportions and combining several patterns with related elements into a single cohesive piece. Recently, stamps, coins and vintage books are inspiring her. Paper has long been one of her favorite medium and Elizabeth has been making cards (and other things) since she was a girl. After studying the classics in college, Elizabeth was an executive recruiter in the healthcare and technology sectors for almost a decade before her paper craft hobby became more serious. By 2003, she was selling her cards at upscale stores in southern California and contributing to Leisure Arts books. Laughing Elizabeth’s Ephemera in Maine in 2009, Elizabeth expended his collection to include gift bags and journals as well as framed assemblages and later on paper cones. A member of United Maine Craftsmen, the Society of Southern Maine Craftsmen, Yarmouth Arts and part of the Maine Made/America’s Best program, Elizabeth’s work can be found at select stores, galleries and juried shows throughout the country.

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SeaStoneWineGlass

Anne Johnson

Inspired by New England’s beautiful beach stones, Arra David and Anne Johnson of Seastones are longtime New England rock hounds. Creating functional artwork in stone, including stemware, food servers, wine racks, sculptures and more, their love for Mother Nature inspires Arra and Anne to create items that brings the outdoors in. Crafting each piece with attention to detail, quality, and respect for nature, working with stone calls for custom fixtures and techniques. Arra, an engineer and serial inventor, says it's part of his "normal care and feeding" to put him in the workshop and let him make new products and tools. Anne is an artist with a keen eye for balance and harmony. She enjoys combining the endless varieties of nature's materials into pieces that will not only accentuate homes, but keep people connected to their environment. To keep beaches and forests as they are, Anne and Arra "plant" a new quarry stone in the water to replace each one gathered and they plant ten times the number of trees harvested for their work. Based in Windham, NH, Arra and Anne created Seastones in 2003, where they continue to this day blending stone art with the practical ingenuity — a well-known New England trait.

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JLemaireBatikEggs

Judi Lemaire

Judi Lemaire creates brightly colored Ukrainian Eggs in a multitude of patterns. Specializing in the Batik egg decorating process, Judi using dyes and wax resist, building up her colorful designs on the eggs surface. Over the past thirty years, Judi has studied the traditional Ukrainian designs and developed her own unique style using both traditional and modern methods. She contributed to several exhibits including the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen’s “Once a Child”, “It’s all Black and White” and a juried exhibition at Colby College’s Marian Graves Mugar Gallery. She also facilitated a program at the Gilford Middle High School, where one hundred students designed and decorated Ukrainian Eggs. A member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Judi’s brightly colored eggs can be found in galleries throughout the state. She also teaches her craft to small groups in local workshops and her work has been presented in New Hampshire Magazine.

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WLiffSculpture

Walter Liff

Working in steel, aluminum or copper, Walter Liff of Steeling Nature creates one-of-a-kind metal sculptures inspired by his love of nature. An avid naturalist, Walter’s work encompasses a range of themes including graceful representations of birds to whimsical depictions of flying pigs. Walter’s interest in metalsmithing began when his son Paul took a welding course in high school. The two developed a strong bond over the craft and when Paul died of multiple sclerosis, Walter continued to make his beautiful sculptures as a tribute to his son. Walter is now recognized as an award winning artist and has been featured in several publications and television appearances. His work can be found in private and corporate collections throughout the United States and Europe.

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SSmithMarbledCard

Sarah Smith

Using the technique paper marbling to create dazzling colors and textures on her notebooks, gift cards and more, Sarah Smith is carrying on an ancient tradition. Paper Marbling is the process of floating paint on a medium of carrageenan (a sea weed extract) and water. The paint is then drawn with a series of tools to produce a wide variety of one-of-kind prints. No two are alike and each one is a unique work of art. The art of marbling began in the Mid-East almost 1,000 years ago and was practiced in Europe in the 1600’s. Marbling became an important part of bookbinding and continues to be used in the construction of fine handmade books.

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LSpillerRockVases

Lee Spiller

Lee Spiller has long been drawn to the rocky shores and beautiful islands of New England. Inspired to make his stone flower vases from the summer wildflowers that grew above the cobblestone beaches, Lee creates a variety of natural stone products from his vases and lamps, to his votives and business card holders. Carefully selecting his stones from remote beaches of the stormy North Atlantic that have been naturally shaped by countless years of tumbling in surf and rapids, Lee carefully cuts and drills each piece with modern diamond tools. He then seals each stone with a stone specific sealant that enhances their color and signs each piece. According to Lee, “each piece is made with a profound love and respect for nature.” Having worked naturally occurring stone into pleasing and useful objects since 1990, Lee’s work can be found in fine galleries and shops across the country. Lee is also a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

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JSzokeDriedFlowerArt

Joan Szoke

Noted for her unique botanical arts including pressed flower illustrations, pen and ink and watercolor nature prints, Joan Szoke of Remembered Gardens relies on her musical training for the composition of line, form, harmony and contrast in her work. Her beautiful flower pieces are delicately arranged into unique designs. Using only real flowers and plant materials in her art, Joan uses a wide range of flowers grown from seed. A juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Joan has not only taught workshops about the pressed flower technique, but also displays her work at galleried throughout the state.

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WhisperHillBathBodySoap

Whisper Hill Bath & Body

Randy and Jennie Cysyk of Whisper Hill Bath & Body create lotions, bath salts and soaps that are not only soothing for your skin, but create memorable experiences for your senses. Located in the charming village of Bridgewater, VT, the duo at Whisper Hill creates their bath and body products using natural ingredients including: olive oil, goat's milk, aloe vera, castor oil, shea butter and other nourishing components. Striving to produce products as free from synthetic ingredients as possible, all their soaps, bath salts and body scrubs are made with no chemical preservatives and most of their products are scented with natural essential oils. In addition to creating products more gentle and nourishing for the skin and body, Whisper Hill packages all their products in an eco-friendly way that is, “impacting the earth as minimally as possible, without sacrificing quality. In short we are committed to helping make the world a better place to live. Here's to your health, wellbeing and comfort!”

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Exeter Fine Crafts • 61 Water Street, Exeter NH 03833 • (603) 778-8282 • info@exeterfinecrafts.com
Gallery Hours:
Mon, Tues, Wed, Fri, & Sat 10 - 5:30
Thursdays 10 - 7 • Sundays 12 - 4

©Exeter Fine Crafts. Individual works © by the respective artists
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, including the right to reproduce this website or portions thereof in any form whatsoever.