Pottery

CKnoxPitcherThumbCKnoxPitcher
Pitcher by Christy Knox
IrinaOkulaSaggarBowlThumbIrinaOkulaSaggarBowl
Saggar Bowl by Irina Okula
SRussellRakuVaseThumbSRussellRakuVase
Raku Vase by Steve & Sue Russell
LDilmoreCasseroleThumbLDilmoreCasserole
Casserole by Lorraine Dilmore

CKeiserTileThumbCKeiserTile
Tile by Carol Keiser
NLindenfeldBowlsNLindenfeldBowls
Porcelain bowls by Naomi Lindenfeld
DLiptakOilBottleDLiptakOilBottle
Oil bottle by Devitt Liptak
SYoungLampThumbSYoungLamp
Lamp by Stephanie Young

RobinsonPotterySetThumbRobinsonPotterySet
Pottery by Cathy & Dave Robinson
EFullerWeddingBowlThumbEFullerWeddingBowl
Wedding Bowl by Elaine Fuller
STornowTileThumbSTornowTile
Tile by Sibylle Tornow
JDuchesneauSaggarVaseThumbJDuchesneauSaggarVase
Saggar Vase by Janet Duchesneau

SBrautigamJarThumbSBrautigamJar
Jar by Shana Brautigam
EdgecombPottersSetThumbEdgecombPottersSet
Bowl and Platter by Edgecomb Potters
SCornwellVineSetThumbSCornwellVineSet
Pottery by Sally Cornwell
TMintonServerTMintonServer
Server by Ty Minton

LFletcherYogaFrogThumbLFletcherYogaFrog
Yoga Frog Sculpture by Liz Fletcher
SCunliffeBowlThumbSCunliffeBowl
Bowl by Steve Cunliffe
SAlpaslanPotteryThumbSAlpaslanPottery
Pottery by Sibel Alpaslan
EGrenadierVaseThumbEGrenadierVase
Vase by Ellen Grenadier

Made from various types of clay, pottery can include pots, dishes and other work either decorative or functional. Potters, also referred to as ceramicists, use a wide spectrum of methods and materials to create a given piece. The process begins by either kneading or wedging the clay to remove trapped air bubbles and ensure even moisture content. Once the clay has been kneaded, it can be shaped either by hand or with a tool, such as a wheel. After the greenware piece dries partially to a leather-hardened state, it can be trimmed and if applicable, a handle attached. The piece is then left to dry completely to a bone hardened state where it is placed in a kiln and heated at high temperatures to permanently harden the piece. This first firing is referred to as a bisque or biscuit firing. A ceramic piece can be decorated before firing with colored slips or after firing with glazes. Glazes are applied to a bisque piece, fired again in a process called a glaze firing that further hardens the piece. Raku firing is a traditional Japanese low-firing process, in which a fired piece is removed from a hot kiln and allowed to cool in the open air. Western-style raku usually involves removing pottery from the kiln while red-hot and placing it into a container filled with combustible materials. Once the materials ignite, the containers are closed. This process produces a vast array of amazing color and surface effects on the clay body.
Exeter Fine Crafts • 61 Water Street, Exeter NH 03833 • (603) 778-8282 • info@exeterfinecrafts.com
Gallery Hours:
Mon, Tues, Wed, Fri, & Sat 10 - 5:30
Thursdays 10 - 7 • Sundays 12 - 4

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